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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    I wasn't asking you to sell yours I was just inquiring about where you can get one. Geez Louise LOL

    Frank


    I found this but I cannot believe the price.

    http://www.amazon.com/Konica-Minolta...2890033&sr=1-6
    Last edited by sparkie1263; 09-13-2009 at 06:03 PM.
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554

    Talking Get 'em when they are NOT hot!

    Frank, it was Elisha looking to make a "quick strike."

    Suddenly, I am feeling pretty good about my buying the KM 17-35 lens "on a hunch", when I was prepping for the A900, last year. That and the 28-75mm f/2.8

    Anyway ... having a load of lenses ... is cool.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 09-13-2009 at 07:31 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr® & Sdi

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    Anyway ... having a load of lenses ... is cool.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rooz View Post
    correction...GOOD lens' are the way to go.
    What he said.
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    6
    Hello, I'm new to photography. This is my latest hobby as of August 24th (i bought the camera as a birthday present for myself ^_^) and I've been looking for a Sony forum to help me learn more and this happened to be one of the first results in Google

    "I believe Don should purchase the SONY AF 70-400mm f/4-5.6 G SSM lens to replace his Tokina AT-X 840 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6 and TAMRON SP AF 200-500mm f/5-6.3 Di LD lens for the follow reason: because the Sony lens looks beautiful, what more reason do you need!? And it's also better to recycle!"

    Sorry i couldn't give anything more insightful but i don't have enough camera knowledge to be useful yet. Figured this was worth a shot :P

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,758
    oh just send me the thing already...lol

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    18

    Don should purchase the SONY

    "I believe Don should purchase the SONY AF 70-400mm f/4-5.6 G SSM lens to replace his Tokina AT-X 840 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6 and TAMRON SP AF 200-500mm f/5-6.3 Di LD lens for the follow reason:

    Don’s NEW Sony 70-400mm f/4-5.6 SSM G is one of the latest lenses in Sony's quest to catch up with the big boys (Canon and Nikon that is).Cause if you cant run with the big boys stay on the porch…isn’t that what they say ? The Sony lens belongs to the G ("Gold") lineup - Sony's designated professional-grade lenses. The price tag is accordingly high at around 1400-1500€/US$ - this is about in line with its Canon/Nikon counterparts. The 70-400mm G is a full format lens but naturally it works perfectly on Sony Alpha APS-C DSLRs with a field-of-view equivalent to 105-600mm. Typical applications include sports and wildlife photography. In the beginning there were some controversial discussions in the community about the silver finish of the lens and it's still pretty much a consensus that white or black would have been more appropriate for a professional grade lens. Sony felt probably the need "to be different" here. Anyway, technically this is rather irrelevant and the finish ensures that the lens does not heat up when shooting under strong sunlight.
    The build quality of the lens is truly superb - the lens body is mainly made of metal and high quality plastic parts assembled with very tight tolerances. The focus and zoom control rings operate very smooth. It is a bit unusual that the zoom ring is located in front of the focus ring (at the front of the lens) but you shouldn't have any problems to get used to this. Typical for all lenses in this class the lens extends when zooming towards the long end of the range. The front element does not rotate thanks to the internal focusing (IF) system. The lens does not feature any seals which is somewhat unfortunate regarding the (professional) target audience and relative to its comparatively high price tag. The lens is supplied with a deep, petal-shaped lens hood.
    An interesting aspect of the lens is the SSM - the SuperSonic AF Motor which is similar to Canon's USM or Nikon's SWM. The variant used in the 70-400mm G is reasonably fast (reads: not blazingly fast) and near silent. We did see some focus accuracy problems in the field when shooting at f/8 but we can't rule out that this was more a camera problem. Sony did also incorporate a dedicated focus-stop button as well as a focus limiter. It makes sense to take advantage of the latter in order to avoid excessive hunting because the focus path of the lens is rather long.
    Specifications
    Optical construction 18 elements in 12 groups inc. 2x ED elements
    Number of aperture blades 9 (rounded)
    min. focus distance 1.5m (max. magnification ratio ~1:4)
    Dimensions 94.5x196mm
    Weight 1490g
    Filter size 77mm (non-rotating)
    Hood petal-shaped, snap-on, supplied
    Other features DMF, focus stop button, focus limiter
    Distortions
    The Sony 70-400mm G has no problems with respect to optical distortions whatsoever. There's only a very slight degree of barrel distortion at 70mm and very slight pincushion distortions at longer focal lengths. This is absolutely nothing to worry about in field conditions.
    Move the mouse cursor over the focal length text marks below to observe the respective distortions
    70mm
    200mm
    300mm
    400mm


    The chart above has a real-world size of about 120x80cm.
    Vignetting
    Thanks to the full format design the amount of vignetting (on APS-C DSLRs) is not field-relevant with a max. edge darkening of around 0.3EV at 70mm @ f/4 and 400mm @ f/5.6.


    The Sony 70-400mm

    MTF (resolution)
    The Sony 70-400mm G produced very good resolution figures in the MTF lab. The performance is best at 70mm with a generally excellent quality across the image field. There's a slight decrease in performance towards 200mm and a little more so at 300mm and 400mm respectively. Unsurprisingly the quality is "worst" at 400mm @ f/5.6 (also with slightly reduced contrast) but we're still talking about very good resolution figures here. Stopping down improves the border quality till reaching its maximum at f/8. The amount of field curvature is negligible.
    Below is a simplified summary of the formal findings. The chart shows in line widths per picture height (LW/PH) which can be taken as a quantity for sharpness. The chart is limited to the visually relevant LW/PH range of [850, 2350]. If you want to know more about the MTF50 figures you may check out the corresponding Imatest Explanations.

    Chromatic Aberrations (CAs)
    Lateral chromatic aberrations (color shadows at harsh contrast transitions) are generally well controlled especially in the mid to lower section of the zoom range. The problem is a bit more obvious at 400mm with an average CA width of around 1px at the image borders which is still very moderate in absolute terms.

    Needless to say but you can correct or at least reduce lateral CAs during post-processing e.g. via Photoshop.
    Bokeh (out-of-focus blur)
    So far things looked very positive indeed. However, the lens has one glitch - the bokeh. To be precise the bokeh at the long of the zoom range (> 250mm). We didn't test this issue formally but it became quite apparent during our field tests. Here're two examples (100% crops) at 400mm @ f/5.6:


    I reckon that some of you may be a little shocked by this but to be honest this is not unusual. The Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 USM L IS and the Sigma AF 50-500mm f/4-6.3 EX HSM suffer from similar issues although maybe not this extreme (the highlights). The quality of the bokeh is still a weak spot of long tele zoom lenses compared to primes. As already hinted above the situation is also somewhat better at shorter focal lengths.




    TAKINA -AT-X 840 AF

    Description
    In 1996 Tokina created a new class of telephoto lens when it introduced the original AT-X 840 AF. This was the smallest zoom lens available that had a bright f/5.6 aperture at 400mm. Now Tokina has recreated the lens for the digital age.

    Still the smallest SLR lens available that zooms to 400mm, the AT-X 840 AF D has a smooth and quick internal focusing system that means the all-metal inner barrel that houses the heaviest glass elements does not have to rotate when the lens focuses, making it much faster than the previous models.

    Optically, the AT-X840 AF D has new multi-coatings applied to the elements that are formulated to compensate of the highly reflective CCD and CMOS sensors in today’s Digital SLR cameras. The new multi-coating greatly reduces the chance of internal flare or ghost reflections.

    A built-in low-profile tripod collar makes for a well-balanced camera/lens combination when using a tripod or monopod. For best results, Tokina always recommends using a tripod or monopod with telephoto lenses.

    Another feature that makes the AT-X 840 AF D an excellent traveling companion is the zoom lock switch. The zoom can be locked at 80mm to so there is not chance of “zoom creep” when the camera and lens are being carried over the shoulder.

    Tokina kept ease of use in mind with the new AT-X 840 AF D, the new BH-725 lens hood with the a PL Assist spring loaded thumb wheel allows a circular polarizer or special effects filter to be rotated while the lens hood is in place. No more removing the hood to change the position of the filter.


    Specifications
    Mount availability: Canon EOS, Nikon-D,

    Focal length: 80 to 400mm

    Maximum aperture: f/4.5-5.6

    Minimum aperture: f/32

    Optical construction: 16 elements in 10 groups

    SD glass: One elements

    Coatings: Multi-layer

    Angle of view: 29° 50’ to 6°13’

    Minimum focus distance: 2.5m (8.2 ft.)

    Reproduction ratio: 1: 5.4

    Zooming system: Rotary type

    Number of diaphragm blades: 8

    Filter size: 72mm

    Maximum outer diameter: 77.2mm (3.0in.)

    Dimensions: 3.1 in. (79mm) X 136.5 mm (5.4in.)

    Weight: 1020 g (35.9 oz..)

    Lens Hood BH-725


    Still the smallest SLR lens available that zooms to 400mm, the AT-X 840 AF D has a smooth and quick internal focusing system that means the all-metal inner barrel that houses the heaviest glass elements does not have to rotate when the lens focuses, making it much faster than the previous models. Optically, the AT-X840 AF D has new multi-coatings applied to the elements that are formulated to compensate of the highly reflective CCD and CMOS sensors in today’s Digital SLR cameras. The new multi-coating greatly reduces the chance of internal flare or ghost reflections. A built-in low-profile tripod collar makes for a well-balanced camera/lens combination when using a tripod or monopod. The AT-X 840 AF D an excellent travelingThe AT-X 840 AF D an excellent traveling companion is the zoom lock switch. The zoom can be locked at 80mm to so there is not chance of “zoom creep�? when the camera and lens are being carried over the shoulder. No more removing the hood to change the position of the filter.
    Tokina AF80-400mm f/4.5-5.6 AT-X D Specification
    Available mount(s) Canon EF, Nikon F
    Application(s) Portrait, Landscape, Wildlife
    Category(s) Tele zoom
    Multiplier 1×
    Stabilizer no
    Focal length 80 - 400 mm (5× zoom)
    Lens construction 16 elements in 10 groups
    Angle of view 35mm: 29.16-16.26°
    digital: N/A
    Number of blades 8
    Maximum aperture wide: f/4.5 tele: f/5.6
    Minimum aperture wide: f/32 tele: N/A
    Minimum focusing distance 250 cm
    Magnification 0.19×
    Filter size 72 mm
    Size ∅ 79 × 136.5 mm
    Weight 1020 g
    Notes
    AF speed N/A
    AF sound

    Internal focusing yes
    Internal zoom no
    Fix front lens N/A
    Mount type metal
    Weather sealed N/A
    Drop in filter no
    Ultrasonic AF no
    APS-C sized circle no
    Low dispersion lens element yes
    Hard case N/A
    Soft case N/A
    Lens hood BH-725
    printable lens hood

    Tripod adapter N/A



    Product Overview
    This is a zoom lens from Tamron that lets you bring your far away subjects up close while compressing the distance between the main subject and the background for professional-looking results. Even while covering up to a 500mm that enables you to take ultra telephoto shots of subjects further than the eye can see, its design is extremely lightweight and compact. When
    mounted on an APS-C size digital SLR camera, it provides a focal length equivalent to a 760mm for super ultra telephoto imaging.


    Depth of Field Tool
    This tool shows the correlation between depth of field and focusing distance as well as the aperture and focal length.
    Specifications
    Model A08
    Lens Construction (Groups/Elements) 10/13
    Angle of View 12°-5°
    Diaphragm Blade Number 9
    Minimum Aperture F/32
    Minimum Focus Distance 2.5m (98.4") (entire zoom range)
    Macro Magnification Ratio 1:5.0
    Filter Diameter ø86
    Weight 1237g (43.6oz)
    Diameter x Length ø3.7 x 8.9in.
    (ø93.5 x 227.0mm)
    Accessory Lens hood, Detachable Filter Effect Control
    Mount Canon - Available
    Nikon - Available
    Sony - Available

    BIG ZOOMS
    lighter, sharper and more affordable than ever before.Zoom lenses are often more affordable than fast-aperture telephoto lenses because their maximum apertures are
    smaller and/or variable. Since most landscape photographs are created with a moderate to small aperture, however, this isn’t the big disadvantage that it
    might first appear to be. The light reaching the viewfinder may be dimmer when
    shooting under low-light conditions, but if you’re shooting digitally, you can easily
    evaluate your framing and composition by reviewing your image on the
    camera’s LCD.I recommend using a tripod when shooting with a long zoom lens. Not only does the tripod assure me that there won’t be any camera movement, but it also gives me the freedom to carefully fine-tune my compositions. With the camera on a stable platform, I can study the image in the viewfinder, carefully
    checking the edges and corners of the frame for visual distractions. Things like
    bright highlights on foliage, out-of-focus tree limbs or small pieces of litter have a way of creeping into a photo. Working from a tripod helps us avoid those
    little surprises.I’ve been working with the Tamron SP AF200-500mm ƒ/5-6.3 Di LD (IF)zoom lens since it was first introduced.Not that long ago, a lens this long would have been a heavy, clumsy monster, a hardship to carry—the kind of glass you only pull out of the case on special occasions, and only when you’re close to
    the car. But the Tamron 200-500mm is actually light enough to leave on my
    camera as I hike trails, and the integrated tripod mount gives it a solid, balanced
    feel. It makes shooting with an ultra-telephoto a pleasure, rather than a physical and logistical challenge. As a result, I’ve been doing more and more ultra-telephoto landscapes lately, and I’ve found that it opens some intriguing possibilities.The next time you’re out shooting,try creating a landscape with a telephoto zoom. Experiment with the way it can change your perspective or isolate small portions of a distant scene. By narrowingyour angle of view, you may find
    new ways to expand your vision.

    For the average day to day use of a lens I feel any of these would do…but for Don to keep up his spirits and continue to grow learn and experience new horizons these are my findings, information, reviews and comparison for why Don should purchase the SONY AF 70-400mm f/4-5.6 G SSM lens to replace his Tokina AT-X 840 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6 and TAMRON SP AF 200-500mm f/5-6.3 Di LD lens, Thank you I hope this was information and useful for many.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    Code:
    Quote Originally Posted by cascadingshadows View Post
    "I believe Don should purchase the SONY AF 70-400mm f/4-5.6 G SSM lens to replace his Tokina AT-X 840 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6 and TAMRON SP AF 200-500mm f/5-6.3 Di LD lens for the follow reason: Don’s NEW Sony 70-400mm f/4-5.6 SSM G is one of the latest lenses in Sony's quest to catch up with the big boys (Canon and Nikon that is).Cause if you cant run with the big boys stay on the porch…isn’t that what they say ? The Sony lens belongs to the G ("Gold") lineup - Sony's designated professional-grade lenses. The price tag is accordingly high at around 1400-1500€/US$ - this is about in line with its Canon/Nikon counterparts. The 70-400mm G is a full format lens but naturally it works perfectly on Sony Alpha APS-C DSLRs with a field-of-view equivalent to 105-600mm. Typical applications include sports and wildlife photography. In the beginning there were some controversial discussions in the community about the silver finish of the lens and it's still pretty much a consensus that white or black would have been more appropriate for a professional grade lens. Sony felt probably the need "to be different" here. Anyway, technically this is rather irrelevant and the finish ensures that the lens does not heat up when shooting under strong sunlight. The build quality of the lens is truly superb - the lens body is mainly made of metal and high quality plastic parts assembled with very tight tolerances. The focus and zoom control rings operate very smooth. It is a bit unusual that the zoom ring is located in front of the focus ring (at the front of the lens) but you shouldn't have any problems to get used to this. Typical for all lenses in this class the lens extends when zooming towards the long end of the range. The front element does not rotate thanks to the internal focusing (IF) system. The lens does not feature any seals which is somewhat unfortunate regarding the (professional) target audience and relative to its comparatively high price tag. The lens is supplied with a deep, petal-shaped lens hood. An interesting aspect of the lens is the SSM - the SuperSonic AF Motor which is similar to Canon's USM or Nikon's SWM. The variant used in the 70-400mm G is reasonably fast (reads: not blazingly fast) and near silent. We did see some focus accuracy problems in the field when shooting at f/8 but we can't rule out that this was more a camera problem. Sony did also incorporate a dedicated focus-stop button as well as a focus limiter. It makes sense to take advantage of the latter in order to avoid excessive hunting because the focus path of the lens is rather long. Specifications Optical construction 18 elements in 12 groups inc. 2x ED elements Number of aperture blades 9 (rounded) min. focus distance 1.5m (max. magnification ratio ~1:4) Dimensions 94.5x196mm Weight 1490g Filter size 77mm (non-rotating) Hood petal-shaped, snap-on, supplied Other features DMF, focus stop button, focus limiter Distortions The Sony 70-400mm G has no problems with respect to optical distortions whatsoever. There's only a very slight degree of barrel distortion at 70mm and very slight pincushion distortions at longer focal lengths. This is absolutely nothing to worry about in field conditions. Move the mouse cursor over the focal length text marks below to observe the respective distortions 70mm 200mm 300mm 400mm The chart above has a real-world size of about 120x80cm. Vignetting Thanks to the full format design the amount of vignetting (on APS-C DSLRs) is not field-relevant with a max. edge darkening of around 0.3EV at 70mm @ f/4 and 400mm @ f/5.6. The Sony 70-400mm MTF (resolution) The Sony 70-400mm G produced very good resolution figures in the MTF lab. The performance is best at 70mm with a generally excellent quality across the image field. There's a slight decrease in performance towards 200mm and a little more so at 300mm and 400mm respectively. Unsurprisingly the quality is "worst" at 400mm @ f/5.6 (also with slightly reduced contrast) but we're still talking about very good resolution figures here. Stopping down improves the border quality till reaching its maximum at f/8. The amount of field curvature is negligible. Below is a simplified summary of the formal findings. The chart shows in line widths per picture height (LW/PH) which can be taken as a quantity for sharpness. The chart is limited to the visually relevant LW/PH range of [850, 2350]. If you want to know more about the MTF50 figures you may check out the corresponding Imatest Explanations. Chromatic Aberrations (CAs) Lateral chromatic aberrations (color shadows at harsh contrast transitions) are generally well controlled especially in the mid to lower section of the zoom range. The problem is a bit more obvious at 400mm with an average CA width of around 1px at the image borders which is still very moderate in absolute terms. Needless to say but you can correct or at least reduce lateral CAs during post-processing e.g. via Photoshop. Bokeh (out-of-focus blur) So far things looked very positive indeed. However, the lens has one glitch - the bokeh. To be precise the bokeh at the long of the zoom range (> 250mm). We didn't test this issue formally but it became quite apparent during our field tests. Here're two examples (100% crops) at 400mm @ f/5.6: I reckon that some of you may be a little shocked by this but to be honest this is not unusual. The Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 USM L IS and the Sigma AF 50-500mm f/4-6.3 EX HSM suffer from similar issues although maybe not this extreme (the highlights). The quality of the bokeh is still a weak spot of long tele zoom lenses compared to primes. As already hinted above the situation is also somewhat better at shorter focal lengths. TAKINA -AT-X 840 AF Description In 1996 Tokina created a new class of telephoto lens when it introduced the original AT-X 840 AF. This was the smallest zoom lens available that had a bright f/5.6 aperture at 400mm. Now Tokina has recreated the lens for the digital age. Still the smallest SLR lens available that zooms to 400mm, the AT-X 840 AF D has a smooth and quick internal focusing system that means the all-metal inner barrel that houses the heaviest glass elements does not have to rotate when the lens focuses, making it much faster than the previous models. Optically, the AT-X840 AF D has new multi-coatings applied to the elements that are formulated to compensate of the highly reflective CCD and CMOS sensors in today’s Digital SLR cameras. The new multi-coating greatly reduces the chance of internal flare or ghost reflections. A built-in low-profile tripod collar makes for a well-balanced camera/lens combination when using a tripod or monopod. For best results, Tokina always recommends using a tripod or monopod with telephoto lenses. Another feature that makes the AT-X 840 AF D an excellent traveling companion is the zoom lock switch. The zoom can be locked at 80mm to so there is not chance of “zoom creep” when the camera and lens are being carried over the shoulder. Tokina kept ease of use in mind with the new AT-X 840 AF D, the new BH-725 lens hood with the a PL Assist spring loaded thumb wheel allows a circular polarizer or special effects filter to be rotated while the lens hood is in place. No more removing the hood to change the position of the filter. Specifications Mount availability: Canon EOS, Nikon-D, Focal length: 80 to 400mm Maximum aperture: f/4.5-5.6 Minimum aperture: f/32 Optical construction: 16 elements in 10 groups SD glass: One elements Coatings: Multi-layer Angle of view: 29° 50’ to 6°13’ Minimum focus distance: 2.5m (8.2 ft.) Reproduction ratio: 1: 5.4 Zooming system: Rotary type Number of diaphragm blades: 8 Filter size: 72mm Maximum outer diameter: 77.2mm (3.0in.) Dimensions: 3.1 in. (79mm) X 136.5 mm (5.4in.) Weight: 1020 g (35.9 oz..) Lens Hood BH-725 Still the smallest SLR lens available that zooms to 400mm, the AT-X 840 AF D has a smooth and quick internal focusing system that means the all-metal inner barrel that houses the heaviest glass elements does not have to rotate when the lens focuses, making it much faster than the previous models. Optically, the AT-X840 AF D has new multi-coatings applied to the elements that are formulated to compensate of the highly reflective CCD and CMOS sensors in today’s Digital SLR cameras. The new multi-coating greatly reduces the chance of internal flare or ghost reflections. A built-in low-profile tripod collar makes for a well-balanced camera/lens combination when using a tripod or monopod. The AT-X 840 AF D an excellent travelingThe AT-X 840 AF D an excellent traveling companion is the zoom lock switch. The zoom can be locked at 80mm to so there is not chance of “zoom creep�? when the camera and lens are being carried over the shoulder. No more removing the hood to change the position of the filter. Tokina AF80-400mm f/4.5-5.6 AT-X D Specification Available mount(s) Canon EF, Nikon F Application(s) Portrait, Landscape, Wildlife Category(s) Tele zoom Multiplier 1× Stabilizer no Focal length 80 - 400 mm (5× zoom) Lens construction 16 elements in 10 groups Angle of view 35mm: 29.16-16.26° digital: N/A Number of blades 8 Maximum aperture wide: f/4.5 tele: f/5.6 Minimum aperture wide: f/32 tele: N/A Minimum focusing distance 250 cm Magnification 0.19× Filter size 72 mm Size ∅ 79 × 136.5 mm Weight 1020 g Notes AF speed N/A AF sound Internal focusing yes Internal zoom no Fix front lens N/A Mount type metal Weather sealed N/A Drop in filter no Ultrasonic AF no APS-C sized circle no Low dispersion lens element yes Hard case N/A Soft case N/A Lens hood BH-725 printable lens hood Tripod adapter N/A Product Overview This is a zoom lens from Tamron that lets you bring your far away subjects up close while compressing the distance between the main subject and the background for professional-looking results. Even while covering up to a 500mm that enables you to take ultra telephoto shots of subjects further than the eye can see, its design is extremely lightweight and compact. When mounted on an APS-C size digital SLR camera, it provides a focal length equivalent to a 760mm for super ultra telephoto imaging. Depth of Field Tool This tool shows the correlation between depth of field and focusing distance as well as the aperture and focal length. Specifications Model A08 Lens Construction (Groups/Elements) 10/13 Angle of View 12°-5° Diaphragm Blade Number 9 Minimum Aperture F/32 Minimum Focus Distance 2.5m (98.4") (entire zoom range) Macro Magnification Ratio 1:5.0 Filter Diameter ø86 Weight 1237g (43.6oz) Diameter x Length ø3.7 x 8.9in. (ø93.5 x 227.0mm) Accessory Lens hood, Detachable Filter Effect Control Mount Canon - Available Nikon - Available Sony - Available BIG ZOOMS lighter, sharper and more affordable than ever before.Zoom lenses are often more affordable than fast-aperture telephoto lenses because their maximum apertures are smaller and/or variable. Since most landscape photographs are created with a moderate to small aperture, however, this isn’t the big disadvantage that it might first appear to be. The light reaching the viewfinder may be dimmer when shooting under low-light conditions, but if you’re shooting digitally, you can easily evaluate your framing and composition by reviewing your image on the camera’s LCD.I recommend using a tripod when shooting with a long zoom lens. Not only does the tripod assure me that there won’t be any camera movement, but it also gives me the freedom to carefully fine-tune my compositions. With the camera on a stable platform, I can study the image in the viewfinder, carefully checking the edges and corners of the frame for visual distractions. Things like bright highlights on foliage, out-of-focus tree limbs or small pieces of litter have a way of creeping into a photo. Working from a tripod helps us avoid those little surprises.I’ve been working with the Tamron SP AF200-500mm ƒ/5-6.3 Di LD (IF)zoom lens since it was first introduced.Not that long ago, a lens this long would have been a heavy, clumsy monster, a hardship to carry—the kind of glass you only pull out of the case on special occasions, and only when you’re close to the car. But the Tamron 200-500mm is actually light enough to leave on my camera as I hike trails, and the integrated tripod mount gives it a solid, balanced feel. It makes shooting with an ultra-telephoto a pleasure, rather than a physical and logistical challenge. As a result, I’ve been doing more and more ultra-telephoto landscapes lately, and I’ve found that it opens some intriguing possibilities.The next time you’re out shooting,try creating a landscape with a telephoto zoom. Experiment with the way it can change your perspective or isolate small portions of a distant scene. By narrowingyour angle of view, you may find new ways to expand your vision. For the average day to day use of a lens I feel any of these would do…but for Don to keep up his spirits and continue to grow learn and experience new horizons these are my findings, information, reviews and comparison for why Don should purchase the SONY AF 70-400mm f/4-5.6 G SSM lens to replace his Tokina AT-X 840 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6 and TAMRON SP AF 200-500mm f/5-6.3 Di LD lens, Thank you I hope this was information and useful for many. :D
    You ripped half of that from Photozone.de.....
    Last edited by dr4gon; 09-16-2009 at 04:58 AM.
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,087
    Quote Originally Posted by dr4gon View Post
    You ripped half of that from Photozone.de.....
    And you quoted it all...
    E-510
    E-1
    Zuiko 14-54 F2.8-3.5 MkI
    Zuiko 70-300 F4.0-5.6
    Konica Hexanon 52mm F1.8
    Cullmann 2503
    Benro KS-0

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    Quote Originally Posted by jekostas View Post
    And you quoted it all...
    There, I put it in a box!
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554

    Thumbs up Most excellent ...

    Well, I have to tell you, guys ... that was precisely what I had requested for the contest ... and I am not going fault the attempt. There is a tremendous amount of detail and information comparing the three lenses ....and I feel we all can take a lesson from the thoroughness involved in creating that post.

    Fifteen more days to go ... good luck and Keep those "entries" coming.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr® & Sdi

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