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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    412

    Big difference between Nikon type D and G lenses?

    Hi,

    I am looking for a new lens for my camera. I've seen that Nikon makes type "D" and type "G" lenes, and the only difference I can find is that type "D" have an aperture ring on the lens while the type "G" does not. Is this a desireable feature considering that aperture can be controlled from the camera body? Any input is appreciated, Thanks!!!


    Andrew S.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    152
    If your camera can control aperture then the manual aperture ring an a D type lens is totally useless. It isn't used at all.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by sherlock
    Hi,

    I am looking for a new lens for my camera. I've seen that Nikon makes type "D" and type "G" lenes, and the only difference I can find is that type "D" have an aperture ring on the lens while the type "G" does not. Is this a desireable feature considering that aperture can be controlled from the camera body? Any input is appreciated, Thanks!!!


    Andrew S.
    G series is Nikon's newly designed lens. The D series is the older line, which Nikon want to have backward compatibility, that means some older camera, including FM2 can use these lens; it's also a feature for some "neoclassical" users, who want to shoot in manual mode and change the aperture throught the aperture ring just like the "good old days". (it's also applicable to digital camera, like D2X or D70, but remember you can only use the "M" mode) If you do not the habit, just buy the G series, it's just the same; and you get one benefit: no need to worry about forget to lock the aperture ring to the orange mark.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
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    7,147
    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel Lo
    G series is Nikon's newly designed lens. The D series is the older line, which Nikon want to have backward compatibility, that means some older camera, including FM2 can use these lens; it's also a feature for some "neoclassical" users, who want to shoot in manual mode and change the aperture throught the aperture ring just like the "good old days". (it's also applicable to digital camera, like D2X or D70, but remember you can only use the "M" mode) If you do not the habit, just buy the G series, it's just the same; and you get one benefit: no need to worry about forget to lock the aperture ring to the orange mark.
    Bah! Every time I hear about Nikon lenses, I hear of intercompatibility issues. Sure, I know some elderly Nikkor lenses won't fit on some of the later AI cameras that didn't have the flip-down AI indexer. But Nikon seems to be building incompatibility into their system deliberately. If Pentax can make a DSLR that takes older screw-mount and K-Mount lenses then so too can Nikon.

    10 years ago, Canon decided to start a completely new lens system with their EOS AF cameras. That was awful at the time, for Canon MF owners but seems to have allowed Canon to make some very nice lenses. All of Canon's EOS lenses are compatible with their DSLRs.

    Nikon, it seems to me, is making a diabolical mess of things. I can't tell which lenses will fit which cameras any more. As I've said before, there's no way in Hell that I'd ever buy a Nikon DSLR since they seem to want to force me to abandon my perfectly good Nikon lenses in order to replace them with unwanted Nikon digital lenses.

    I look at Canon with interest and the budding Olympus system with even more interest.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Monterey Bay
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    6,007
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys
    Bah! Every time I hear about Nikon lenses, I hear of intercompatibility issues. Sure, I know some elderly Nikkor lenses won't fit on some of the later AI cameras that didn't have the flip-down AI indexer. But Nikon seems to be building incompatibility into their system deliberately. If Pentax can make a DSLR that takes older screw-mount and K-Mount lenses then so too can Nikon.

    10 years ago, Canon decided to start a completely new lens system with their EOS AF cameras. That was awful at the time, for Canon MF owners but seems to have allowed Canon to make some very nice lenses. All of Canon's EOS lenses are compatible with their DSLRs.

    Nikon, it seems to me, is making a diabolical mess of things. I can't tell which lenses will fit which cameras any more. As I've said before, there's no way in Hell that I'd ever buy a Nikon DSLR since they seem to want to force me to abandon my perfectly good Nikon lenses in order to replace them with unwanted Nikon digital lenses.

    I look at Canon with interest and the budding Olympus system with even more interest.
    Seems we've been down this road before. I don't think that AF Nikkor lenses made in the past 10 years have any compatibility issues either.
    Last edited by D70FAN; 02-03-2005 at 10:24 AM.
    D7000, D70, CP990, CP900, FE.
    50mm f/1.8, Sigma 18-125, Sigma 24-70 f/2.8, Nikon 18-105 VR, Nikon 55-200 VR, Nikon 43-86 f/3.5 AiS, Vivitar 28-90 F/2.8-3.5 Macro, Vivitar 75-205 F/3.8-4.8, SB800.
    Ha! See, I can change...


    http://d70fan.smugmug.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,225
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys
    Bah! Every time I hear about Nikon lenses, I hear of intercompatibility issues. Sure, I know some elderly Nikkor lenses won't fit on some of the later AI cameras that didn't have the flip-down AI indexer. But Nikon seems to be building incompatibility into their system deliberately. If Pentax can make a DSLR that takes older screw-mount and K-Mount lenses then so too can Nikon.

    10 years ago, Canon decided to start a completely new lens system with their EOS AF cameras. That was awful at the time, for Canon MF owners but seems to have allowed Canon to make some very nice lenses. All of Canon's EOS lenses are compatible with their DSLRs.

    Nikon, it seems to me, is making a diabolical mess of things. I can't tell which lenses will fit which cameras any more. As I've said before, there's no way in Hell that I'd ever buy a Nikon DSLR since they seem to want to force me to abandon my perfectly good Nikon lenses in order to replace them with unwanted Nikon digital lenses.

    I look at Canon with interest and the budding Olympus system with even more interest.
    Oh, for Pete's sake!!! I have a Canon A-1. It takes FD lenses. Then there's MF lenses which I couldn't use. Then there's the EOS line. Before FD, I'm sure there was something else. But those I've mentioned are only from the late 70's on. Three completely different systems! If I've read correctly, I can use Nikon lenses from as early as 1964 on my D70. I can't always use the full technology of my camera with each lens, but I can use the glass. True, there are a few lenses in one particular series that I cannot use. Film and future full frame DSLRs will not be able to use DX lenses. But these are MINOR aberrations compared to the way Canon changes mounts. I suspect when Andre Agassi stops playing tennis, Canon will come out with a new designer line.

    Cheers,
    Eric

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys
    Bah! Every time I hear about Nikon lenses, I hear of intercompatibility issues. Sure, I know some elderly Nikkor lenses won't fit on some of the later AI cameras that didn't have the flip-down AI indexer. But Nikon seems to be building incompatibility into their system deliberately. If Pentax can make a DSLR that takes older screw-mount and K-Mount lenses then so too can Nikon.

    10 years ago, Canon decided to start a completely new lens system with their EOS AF cameras. That was awful at the time, for Canon MF owners but seems to have allowed Canon to make some very nice lenses. All of Canon's EOS lenses are compatible with their DSLRs.

    Nikon, it seems to me, is making a diabolical mess of things. I can't tell which lenses will fit which cameras any more. As I've said before, there's no way in Hell that I'd ever buy a Nikon DSLR since they seem to want to force me to abandon my perfectly good Nikon lenses in order to replace them with unwanted Nikon digital lenses.

    I look at Canon with interest and the budding Olympus system with even more interest.
    Hey, it not the case. For Nikon, new model can always take old Lens, not the vice-versa except DX series, which is for DSLR only (Kodak's DSC14n cannot use the DX Lens for it's full frame size CCD, but it is not made by Nikon!) My D100 can accept the Lens that I bought in 1977!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
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    7,147
    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel Lo
    Hey, it not the case. For Nikon, new model can always take old Lens, not the vice-versa except DX series, which is for DSLR only (Kodak's DSC14n cannot use the DX Lens for it's full frame size CCD, but it is not made by Nikon!) My D100 can accept the Lens that I bought in 1977!

    Yes. It'll accept the lens. But it won't work with it. You have to guess the exosure or use a separate exposure meter - so you're pretty much using a Nikkormat F with Nikkor Q lenses but it's a darned lot more expensive.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hong Kong
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    107
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys
    Yes. It'll accept the lens. But it won't work with it. You have to guess the exosure or use a separate exposure meter - so you're pretty much using a Nikkormat F with Nikkor Q lenses but it's a darned lot more expensive.

    I'm talking about new camera using old Lens, NOT old camera using new Lens! And I can use the new D AF lens with my antique F3 with manual focus, but the exposure meter works fine! If I only have a Nikkomat, I will only buy second hand old Lens, absolutely not so stupid to buy the new AF Lens for the Nikkomat.
    I agree that there is still having some limitation, but, who else can do the things better? Canon, Pentax, Olympus, Minolta, Leica or Contax? Can a Canon T90 use EF?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel Lo
    I'm talking about new camera using old Lens, NOT old camera using new Lens! And I can use the new D AF lens with my antique F3 with manual focus, but the exposure meter works fine! If I only have a Nikkomat, I will only buy second hand old Lens, absolutely not so stupid to buy the new AF Lens for the Nikkomat.
    I agree that there is still having some limitation, but, who else can do the things better? Canon, Pentax, Olympus, Minolta, Leica or Contax? Can a Canon T90 use EF?
    Ah, there's been a misunderstanding.

    I was repeating what Nikon stated in an email to me. The new digital cameras will not work with MF lenses. Sure - they'll fit onto the body but they won't work with it. Focussing has to be done by guesstimation as there's absolutely no focussing aid. Exposure has to be guesstimated or calculated via a separate light meter. The only mode available is manual and there is no automatic metering available.

    As I said, you have an expensive D70 / D100 and when you have a MF Nikon lens on it, it works just the same as a Nikkormat F would with a Nikkor Q lens - except that the Nikkormat F was better in that it had a split screen to help with focussing.

    Thus, Nikon lens intercompatibility is a cynical ploy to screw more money from hard-pressed punters. since Nikon's played that dirty trick, I'm certainly not buying Nikon ever again. I don't hold a company that thumbs its nose at its customers in such a way in anything other than contempt.

    Back in the 1980s when home computers came out, the various companies produced newer and upgraded models every year. Then people found that none of the software they had bought for the previous model would work on them and that they'd have to buy new software. That was pretty much when the home computer revolution died out. People just weren't going to be conned into buying a new computer when they had to buy new software for it. Many people have PCs now and the software they use gets transferred carefully to the next PC, when they upgrade. I've used Word97 on Windows 95/98/XP and NT - transferring each time. Of course, as Word97 doesn't want to work too well under XP, have I bought Word XP? Certainly not! I went for Open Office, which is better and also free.

    Nikon will rapidly lose its market share by playing the dangerous and cynical ploy of mocking its customers. Nikon has certainly got one ex-customer here who won't be niKONned.

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