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Thread: Red Tail Hawk

  1. #21
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    Actually when it comes to portraits and people, the JPEGs don't come out that great, especially if you have forgotten and had your saturation and contrast turned up in the CS settings. As I and Elisha have pointed out the Sony JPEGs some times don't do a great job and you can't rely on them, so you're right RAW+JPEG is a feasible solution.
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  2. #22
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    Normally, JPEG settings do not apply to RAW files. They are simply recorded from the sensor, bypassing any JPEG processing whatsoever.
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    Normally, JPEG settings do not apply to RAW files. They are simply recorded from the sensor, bypassing any JPEG processing whatsoever.
    They don't. The only thing that affects RAW files (at least on Olympus cameras, I don't know about Sony) is any kind of dynamic range optimization that you have turned on for the shot.

    Quote Originally Posted by dr4gon View Post
    Actually when it comes to portraits and people, the JPEGs don't come out that great, especially if you have forgotten and had your saturation and contrast turned up in the CS settings. As I and Elisha have pointed out the Sony JPEGs some times don't do a great job and you can't rely on them, so you're right RAW+JPEG is a feasible solution.
    Well then that's user error, not a problem with the JPEG processing in-camera.
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  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jekostas View Post

    Well then that's user error, not a problem with the JPEG processing in-camera.
    we're talking about processing here. not camera settings or composition.
    when you add contrast, vibrance, saturation, or WB adjustment on the jpeg file, it most times messes up skin tones in portraits.
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  5. #25
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    A bit off topic question here, I am thinking of going to JPEG + RAW I have copies of both PS elements 6 and AR lightroom 2, as most of you know most of my stuff is attempts at sports shooting in changing to crappy lighting, any opinions as to which PP would be a better fit for me? I had thought about playimg with both to see which I liked but it seems a bit overwhelming.
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  6. #26
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    Try both, but I think RAW should should you just fine. If you like what you've been using, just keep at it.
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  7. #27
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    Sean, shoot cRAW+jpeg. no need to shoot regular RAW. I tried both and i can't notice the difference between RAW and cRAW.
    I shoot all cRAW only now.

    I use Lightroom for 80% of what i do and CS4 for the rest.
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkie1263 View Post
    No I didn't shoot it in RAW. I think I am going to shoot everything in RAW.How do you save the image as a DNG file. I use Adobe RAW through Bridge.

    Thanks
    Frank
    Frank, when you open a RAW file in Photoshop you first get a dialog box with Save Image button in the lower-left corner.
    Click the button and there are options to save in PSD, TIFF, JPEG, or DNG format.
    If you are opening several files, they are placed in a queue to be processed and saved. This is useful if you are processing several files in the Camera Raw dialog box and saving them in the same format.

    In Lightroom, when you "Import" from the Camera there is a choice of converting to DNG as they are transferred. The only small issue is that you can't choose to move them so have to carry out a separate delete.

  9. #29
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    Sean, one benefit of shooting in RAW (or cRAW) is that you have less to think about when out and about taking pictures. Don't worry about DRO or creative styles, don't worry about altering contrast, saturation, sharpness, brightness, you can even forget about White Balance. All these things can be adjusted later so you can just get on with taking pictures and concentrating on the basics of composition, exposure, DOF and motion.

    Sony cRAW is a lossy form of compression. If it weren't there'd be no need to offer it as an option to RAW.
    In the final analysis however, you'll be hard pressed to see any difference between the two. I think it comes down to zone processing and decent choices about about which bits of data are useless. Of course, this won't satisfy the purist. I just wish the Manufactures would all adopt DNG as a standard for in camera compression. This would ensure better (longer) support for your RAW files.

    If you intend to convert and save your images in the DNG format, as many do, one unusual result of using Sony cRAW is that the DNG format often results in a larger file size than does the RAW conversion. So off camera storage may influence your choice between RAW and cRAW.

    I'm not sure why anyone would choose to shoot (c)RAW+JPEG. But I'm sure someone will have an opinion on the benefits.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peekayoh View Post
    Sony cRAW is a lossy form of compression. If it weren't there'd be no need to offer it as an option to RAW.
    In the final analysis however, you'll be hard pressed to see any difference between the two. I think it comes down to zone processing and decent choices about about which bits of data are useless. Of course, this won't satisfy the purist.
    Agreed. There's got to be a difference in there somewhere!
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