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Thread: Double exposure

  1. #1
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    Question Double exposure

    In Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson, he discusses Double Exposure and how certain DSLR's will allow you to double expose an image.

    I've read through my A900 manual, and I can't find any setting that allows for the taking of a double exposure. Does anyone know if it is possible with any of the Alphas??? If so, how do you set it up???

    I'm curious to know if it can be done in camera vs. post production via PS.
    Darin Wessel
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    Zooms: Tamron SP AF70-200mm f2.8 Di LD Macro; Sigma 28-90mm D macro, Konica-Minolta 18-70 f3.5-5.6
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    Minolta RC-1000 remote commander

    Film:
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    YashikaMat 6x6 TLR (other accessories)
    Minolta Maxxum 7000 w/ Minolta 35-80mm f/4-5.6 & Minolta 2800 flash
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  2. #2
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    I think he means bracketing? You can set the A900/A700 to bracket +/- 1 or 2 EV
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    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  3. #3
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    i thought double exposure means 2 different exposes on the same frame so the image is somewhat merged?
    Canon EOS 7D

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    FLUIDR

  4. #4
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    Post.........it.s way better to control anyway

  5. #5
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    Cool Click Click ... ain't gonna happen

    Double exposure was a film idea ... usually to demonstrate movement of some kind, or other special effects. As the 'NUT mentions, post-processing offers tremendous control in developing that double-exposed look. Photoshop tools allow for erasing, cloning and transparency layer adjust. You just cannot get that out of a double-exposure. You are usually stuck with what you have. More often than not ... due to the rather strict and unforgiving timing and lighting considerations of the shutter, it just looks like a mistake.

    What you are fighting with is the program of the camera, wanting to rapidly clear that data-buffer and "crap out" an image, so that the next one is lean and ready to go. The CCD/CMOS does NOT expose like film, in that regard. It is a 'calculated' exposure based on metering and timing ... and not taking into account the unknown qualities of a 'future shot.' The last thing SONY would probably want is a camera that purposely makes "a mistake."

    Welcome to digital imaging.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  6. #6
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    Post-production it is!!!

    This is not bracketing. The technique is to take two shots, 1-stop underexposed on the same film or digital exposure such that they overlap.

    I knew you could do it with film ... usually a mistake of not fully advancing the film, with some cameras allowing you to purposefully set a double exposure. I was curious when Peterson mentioned that some digitals allow you to do this (Understanding Exposure at p. 140).
    Darin Wessel
    α 900
    Zooms: Tamron SP AF70-200mm f2.8 Di LD Macro; Sigma 28-90mm D macro, Konica-Minolta 18-70 f3.5-5.6
    Primes: Minolta 28mm f2.8; Sony 50mm f1.4
    Minolta RC-1000 remote commander

    Film:
    Calumet Cambo CC400 4x5 View Camera
    YashikaMat 6x6 TLR (other accessories)
    Minolta Maxxum 7000 w/ Minolta 35-80mm f/4-5.6 & Minolta 2800 flash
    Minolta Maxxum 5000i & Vivitar 728 AFM flash
    What's next???

  7. #7
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    and sometime whole roll not on purpose..&&^%#%&(()&^%$@@

  8. #8
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    I think some of the Nikons do double (or more) exposures.
    You could do it with flash on the Bulb shutter setting.

  9. #9
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    Lightbulb Some off-the-wall thinking

    Well, I have done a strobe-effect to get a double exposure.

    Name:  spooky-dog-shot.jpg
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    Canon EOS 20D w/ TAMRON SP AF 11-18mm Di-II LD & EF 580
    16mm - f/8 - 1/30 sec - ISO-200 - Manual - strobed flash 2x


    It was just a test shot, but I think you get the idea.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 07-04-2009 at 08:22 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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