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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Great site it has a lot of information. I am going to read through it again.

    Thanks

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,757
    Quote Originally Posted by jekostas View Post
    that's great, but the ball on that tripod is either a 484 or a 482 (or something similar) with an rc2 system strapped on to it, not a 488.
    484-482 are useless for dslr

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Quote Originally Posted by SONYNUT View Post
    484-482 are useless for dslr

    Thanks I will make a note of that.

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,087
    Quote Originally Posted by sparkie1263 View Post
    Thanks I will make a note of that.

    Frank
    Alright, considering you're looking for information on choosing a tripod, perhaps I should expand just a bit.

    1. Take your cameras. Put your heaviest set up (biggest body, glass, flash) on the tripod, and see how well it handles. Not only how well does the tripod tighten up, but how easy is the head to loosen and move with your heaviest setup on it. Some lower-end heads will either seize up completely or you have to tighten the knobs down so much it's impossible to deal with in the field. Tension adjustment knobs are very nice - when you unlock the main holding knob on a ball head, it keeps just enough tension on the body and lens to prevent it from flopping over, so your tripod doesn't suddenly end up on the ground with some very expensive glass ruined.

    2. Forget the weight ratings on tripod and head combinations. A good rule of thumb I heard was expect 1/3-1/2 of the manufacturer's stated weight rating as useful, because manufacturers generally only test for direct load bearing (ie. weight over the centre of rotation on the tripod). This is mostly useless as 99% of the time you're going to have weight hanging off to one side because of a lens, and torsional and direct load bearing are very, very different beasts. Stick your camera on top. Flip it into the vertical slot on a ball head and see how stable the legs are with the camera weight off of the centre of gravity.

    3. The "leg braces/no leg braces" thing is hardly set in stone. Normally people who travel with tripods don't like leg braces as it makes the legs harder to set up and get the tripod level on uneven ground. This is hardly universal, however, as I use a 25-year old set of Cullmann 2503 legs that have braces and are pretty simple to deal with on uneven ground. Be aware that you generally can't set the legs for low-angle shooting with braces, though. If you expect to be shooting outdoors you DO need foot spikes of some type, though.

    4. Try and look for arca-swiss type clamps. Manfrotto is nearly ubiquitous in the lower-end of the market in terms of ball heads and camera clamping systems with the RC0 and RC2 systems, but to be perfectly honest, they're not that good. These plates rely on friction to prevent rotation in the plate for cameras and lenses and that will only go so far. Every high-end (or even semi high-end) ball head manufacturer with the exception of Novoflex uses an Arca-Swiss type connector, and you can get camera plates custom-machined for you camera that have an anti-twist flange to prevent the camera from rotating. These plates are 99% cross compatible with higher-end Giottos ballheads, as well as Benro, Benbo, Wimberely, Really Right Stuff, Arca-Swiss, Markins, Photo Clam, Feisol, Nodal Ninja, and a few others that I can't think of off the top of my head.

    And, of course, the big one is "buy quality once". Don't cheap out or you're going to have to replace your setup rather quickly, and you run the risk of breakage on a vacation, etc, when it's important. This doesn't mean you have to run out and get a set of $900 Gitzo Explorer legs straight out, but don't go super cheap either. Giottos, Manfrotto, Benro, Feisol and Velbon all make extremely highly regarded setups in the 200-300 range that as long as you don't put the heaviest equipment on it, should last you for years.

    Hope that helps

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Thanks again for all the information.

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

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