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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Guelph, Ontario
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    at F22 it should be dark if you are using the same shutter speed as if it were at F4. but in your case the iris is staying open so the amount of light remains the same as if it were F4 although your camera thinks it is set to F22 thus over-exposing the image!

    Hold just your lens and push the spring actuator at the rear of the lens close to the rear element while looking trough the lens from the front or the back and you will notice the iris stay either just open or close!
    it should open or close based on the position of the actuator.
    the camera interacts with that spring lever but since the iris actuator is not controlling the iris blades, nothing will happen!
    Last edited by Elisha; 05-10-2009 at 09:17 AM.
    Canon EOS 7D

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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Des Plaines, IL
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    If his aperture is stuck (this is from experience) ... even though it says f/22 on the indicator ... the image would be exposed identically as it would be at full aperture (f/4) ... in other words there should be no change between the images. You should see no change in image exposure between an "indicated f/4" image or the "indicated f/22" image

    I think where this is getting screwed up is if you are using the "A" mode on the camera. Use the "M" mode and FIX all settings ... THEN do the test, only changing the Aperture setting.

    As you go from f/4 to f/22

    Light -> dark

    I apologize for the confusion, as I tend to forget some people employ the camera's automatic computational settings over the manual method. When you are troubleshooting ... that can be trouble. Stick with the Manual Mode .. and you will quickly and miore than likely get to the heart of the problem.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-10-2009 at 09:51 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #13
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    Dec 2006
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    Guelph, Ontario
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    i had a totally different experience on my Beercan Don.
    at F8 it was overexposed by about +2 and at F16 it was washed out.
    anyway it was an easy fix on the Beercan but based on the diagram for the 35-70....it looks like a lot more work!

    here's one from my Beercan before i fixed it:



    Focal Length: 210.0mm
    Exposure Time: 0.011 s (1/90)
    Aperture: f/9.5
    ISO Equiv.: 400
    Last edited by Elisha; 05-10-2009 at 09:51 AM.
    Canon EOS 7D

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  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    Keeping it tight

    I have to agree, the 35-70mm is an amazing compact zoom (basically, the same size as a 50mm f/1.4 PRIME). The beauty of this lens, on the Minolta Maxxum 9000 is that it actually fit beautifully into the preformed, rather snug-fit cow-hide leather case that Miniolta have made for its cameras. I have two of these beauty cases ... and it always amazed me that a telephoto lens was unveiled when I unsnapped and pulled the cover off. Man, those days are gone, eh? I mean real leather ... good lord, the eco-warriors would have your hide!

    It should be remembered, though, that it was different time. People did not carry "sling bags" or "backpacks" with them. Slinging a camera on your shoulder was the extent of it for both the photojournalist and the consumer shooter. Even a flash was an 'extra.' Having a shiny, leather case with the golden Minolta logo on the front of it was classy-looking.

    Name:  maxxum-case.jpg
Views: 239
Size:  194.4 KB

    Not some beat-up, nasty snag-covered neoprene "bag".

    I kind of wish SONY would update this lens ... and add the digital coatings and some tighter focus tolerances ... but, then it would probably cost $3K, based on the recent SONY pricing. The closest and smallest lens that roughly fits into this description would be the SONY 24-105mm f/3.5-4.5. It is still a full-frame lens and offers quite a bit of range. If I didn't necessarily care for what f/2.8 aperture provides, that lens would be my choice.

    You know what they say, "Be careful what you wish for ..."
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-10-2009 at 11:19 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    76
    I used the "M mode" and all the photos are the same. i used the same shutter speed of 1/60 sec and changed the aperture from 4 to 22 and there was no difference.
    I saw on the lens that the aperture is working using the actuator but it returns too slow.
    I think I will return the lens

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    Red face Rougher roads ...

    That is probably your best bet, because repair could be difficult on these older lenses.

    It will probably cost you at least $60 to have the lens evaluated and sadly, SONY has NO PARTS SUPPORT for much of the legacy glass. Apparently that was sold off to others or simply scrapped during the arranged buy-out in 2005-2006.

    I know it's a little pricey, but take a look at that SONY AF 24-105mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. It really may be a good alternative and worth the cost. It's currently on BACK ORDER on the SONY website, it is available in the USED dept of the B&H Video website for $339
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-10-2009 at 05:19 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    788
    Yes, what happens is the aperture blades get oily, and they don't snap down. The larger aperture number (f/22) actually represents a smaller aperture hole. The camera focuses at the widest (f/4) aperture, then releases the aperture arm down to the smaller aperture. If the blades don't snap down almost instantly, then you are shooting at a wider aperture than the camera has metered for.

    The 35-70 is a great lens, very sharp and fast for the size and price it can be found for. Also fills the 50/55-70 gap between crop zoom lenses and telephotos starting at 70mm. However, as Don said, it shows its age. I dealt with a lot of lens flare, and the small minimum focusing distance was tough to work with sometimes.

    I like those Minolta leather bags. I bought a lowepro that was designed for a batterygrip-less body and a standard size lens to serve a similar purpose. But you are completely right that the newer bags just aren't as classy. I find most photo bags to be downright dorky looking to be honest.
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    788
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    That is probably your best bet, because repair could be difficult on these older lenses.

    It will probably cost you at least $60 tp have the lens evaluated and sadly, SONY has NO PARTS SUPPORT for much of the legacy glass. Apparently that was sold off to others or simply scrapped during the arranged buy-out in 2005-2006.
    I did get this problem fixed on my Minolta 50/1.7 for only $40, and by someone who had been trained by Minolta some years prior. But I doubt you will be so lucky. www.peacecamera.com did it for me. Part of the reason I switched to Canon was so I could shop there, because I liked the place so much.
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
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    Question Why switch ... when there's a good fight to be had?

    Jason, I was seriously thinking of pitching all my SONY/Minolta stuff so I could shop with them, too. Then I woke up ... and yes, it was just a nightmare. Whew! We all have our reasons ...

    To be honest, unless they fronted me an EOS 1Ds Mk III and the EF 85mm f/1.2L II lens on it ... I wouldn't bother changing. Just too deep and I hate the no IS for PRIMES-idea more than you can imagine.

    LOL ... good luck
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-10-2009 at 05:29 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    788
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    Jason, I was seriously thinking of pitching all my SONY/Minolta stuff so I could shop with them, too. Then I woke up ... and yes, it was just a nightmare. Whew! We all have our reasons ...

    To be honest, unless they fronted me an EOS 1Ds Mk III and the EF 85mm f/1.2L II lens on it ... I wouldn't bother changing. Just too deep and I hate the no IS for PRIMES-idea more than you can imagine.

    LOL ... good luck
    Haha, I know, I know.

    There were a number of reasons, and they just all added up. The ability to walk in, talk to the guys in a shop, put a lens on to decided. The high ISO on the 40D (which was one of my main reasons at first, and now I think I would have been happy with the A700), the glass availability is still a big deal. And I simply felt like the 40D fit in my hand better than the A700. I held them side by side, and I just liked the 40D better. However, the Sony battery grip is way more functional, which might tip the ergonomics and button layout scales a bit.

    I'm yet to miss IS very much. There have been way more times I have been happy to use ISO 800 with no fear than times I wished I had IS.

    Given I had a baby and finished school while working full time, so I haven't shot a ton.
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

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