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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,760
    You have to use manual mode
    you have to use manual mode
    you have to use manual mode
    you have to use manual mode
    you have to use manual mode
    repeat after me
    you have to use manual mode
    you have to use manual mode
    you have to use manual mode
    you have to use manual mode
    you have to use manual mode

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    I haven't even made that jump yet. I use it with flash shots but haven't tried it much for other shots. I guess I am just lazy. I will try to use it more. I have been using Raw on some images.

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    16
    Awesome write up. I appreciate your time and effort! In a few years I'll be sure to return the favor.

    I haven't really thought too much about investing more money into faster glass. I need to do research for my camera and see which lens work on the A300. Then start monitoring the auctions. It's my understanding I can use Minolta lenses with my camera, but would all the capabilities be usable? For example, auto-focus, ect. Reason I ask is my wife likes to use my camera as a point and shoot.

    I wanted to crank up the shutter speed but when I did I suffered from loss of light even with the aperture wide open. I cranked up the ISO to 3200 and it was too noisy even as viewed on the LCD, I knew the noise was too much. To compound he problem even more, the lighting kept changing as the show went on, sometimes it was brighter and sometimes they would drop the lights and use a spot light. So I used auto speed... less things to worry about.

    I would really like to find a photography class we can take together so I can learn the full power of the camera.

    I thought about Manual mode, but it seems to only let me control the exposure... I haven't had time to to figure out how to set the other settings.

    Your shutter speed rule helped a lot! I am going to an air show this weekend and intend to take the 300 mm along. I am thinking (until I get the hang of manual mode) to use shutter speed priority and set at 2500.

    If I used manual mode for the air show, what other settings do I have to worry about? Aperture and ISO? It should be sunny so ISO (guess) would be ~ 600 to compensate the fast shutter and what about aperture? Wide open?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    My recommendation is to quickly find a fellow photographer in your area, because you do need a general appreciation for just photographic principles, which that person may some some better mastery of. I have posted many threads referring various Aperture/Shutter speed/ISO combinations. They are, relatively, all over this forum. It would take some time to resurrect them, but look for the four or five-star rated threads. Those threads tend to advance the forum. You may want to start by going to this post and using the links suggested there.

    SONY also has a "Learning Center" which you can join (no cost) and enter. It has tutorials which will directly apply to your camera and can be done at your leisure. What, you are not doing it, yet? Get a move on!

    Also, I recommend that you contact your local community college for a basic "digital photography" course. It would be the perfect intro in how to make use of your camera system.

    In the meantime, to get a jump start on your questions, purchase a copy of "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson

    Just grabbing your camera and charging into a situation, without an appreciation of how to use your "tool" leads to frustration and serious dissatisfaction with the device and your decision to do it. There are certain minimums you need to understand otherwise we all look like were elitists and other such nonsense. Believe me, we all want a "killer solution, all encompassing" to photographic challenges, at the lowest cost possible.

    I have offered you the idea of using the Minolta 50mm f/1.7 lens as a low-light solution. I am sure, most others will agree that this is it. At roughly $100, it covers the light issues, but cannot zoom (there is no conventional zoom available that has an aperture wider than f/2.8). Only prime lenses (fixed focal lengths) are designed with wider apertures.

    The Minolta 50mm f/1.7 lens is autofocus and completely controlled by the camera. You just mount it and select your settings.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-14-2009 at 09:52 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    16
    Found those on Ebay yesterday, there are quite a few of those out there. I think I will jump on one this weekend. That would be a good replacement for my 18-70 I got right now.

    Or do I get the telescopic or wide angle..... LOL!

    Thanks for the suggestions, much appreciated!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    If you have the bucks, the list of lenses that replace the "Kit Lens" are in the first thread posting (<- click on link) in the SONY DSLR Forum, under "Multiple Lens Approach, item number 1, 1a or 1b.

    You're welcome, just get some better glass and enjoy yourself.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-14-2009 at 02:58 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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