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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4

    Using A350 for macro

    Hello,

    Newbie question. I am looking for a macro lens and found "tamron af 90mm f2.8 di macro". My question is: will this lens auto focus or is it only manual focus?

    Also, which is a better macro, the above tamron or sigma 17-70?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    The TAMRON is a real MACRO ... the 17-70mm f/2.8-4 is a "zoom" that can get close. Big difference. Slap them both on and see ...
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4
    Thanks, can tamron be auto focus?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    the Tamron 90mm DI Macro is an auto focus lens.
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4
    Thanks.
    My other newbie question (if you folks don't mind). Could you recommened good quality 'universal' (all around) lense for my A350? The one that came with the kit (18-70) is not very good and does not zoom much.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    The Sony or Tamron 18-250mm would be the one you want. The Sony being a slightly faster lens but optically both are identical.
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Thumbs up A "must have" lens

    Yeah ... pound for pound, the 18-250 is the best around. With all the lenses I have, it stays with me as the "Grab & Go" I figure that should say a lot about my confidence in using that particular lens.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4
    Thanks for all the advise.
    As for macro, will a 50mm be better? I really need to get extremely close up. I primarily photograph tiny watch movements, parts. What would be the best option for this? And could you recommend the actual models as I am new to 'high end' photography and still learning the lingo

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    Well ... macro lenses come in a couple of types. Ones that change physical dimension as they focus ... which can scare the heck out of the things being focused upon ... and those macros that are (IF), which means they do NOT change length when focusing.

    Personally, I prefer the latter.

    The TAMRON SP AF 180mm f/3.5 Di LD MACRO is just such a lens. It provides extreme close ups of your subject while remaining several inches away. Nothing gets "scared" or "skittish" and you get a nice looking shot.

    If you are not concerned about the living and just was a close-up for extreme detail ... you can either opt for a TAMRON SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di MACRO or a SONY AF 100mm f/2.8 MACRO. Both are excellent at what they do, but the SONY does it a little faster .. with a notably higher cost.

    I would recommend a comparison test and pick the one that suits you.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Quote Originally Posted by dwheelie View Post
    Thanks for all the advise.
    As for macro, will a 50mm be better? I really need to get extremely close up. I primarily photograph tiny watch movements, parts. What would be the best option for this? And could you recommend the actual models as I am new to 'high end' photography and still learning the lingo
    Any of the Macros mentioned will give you a 1:1 image; the longer lens allows you to position the end of the lens further away from the subject which is useful with a live subject and may facilitate a better angle for the light.

    You didn't say how much cash you're willing to part with. I've nothing against the lenses mentioned other than the 'several hundred quid' price.

    I took this pic with my 30year old Minolta MD Macro 50mm; I think these are available (with MD to Alpha adapter) for around $50.
    OK the lens is manual focus but I never found AF to be useful with a Macro lens; I tried one but got rid of it in favour of the old one. The new ones may be better but I wouldn't know

    You could also try a reversing ring ($10) if you have a suitable lens.

    Name:  Knurled Thumbwheel.jpg
Views: 61
Size:  300.3 KB
    ISO200, 1/160th, F3.5

    As you can see, depth of field is an issue with Macro I needed f3.5 so I could handhold this shot but you're going to need f8/f11 for your watch parts so you will need to invest in a decent tripod and maybe a flash.

    How much you spend on equipment is down to you and depends on how much of this work you will be doing and its value to you.

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