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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    80
    Good point on the "film cost" Don. I did use the exposure bracketing on a lot of the shots. It did help in a lot of the pictures, and I did bump my ISO to 200.

    I'm not exactly sure what the D-R is or how to use it, anyone care to explain. Remember, simple terms, no photographer lingo (Don).

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    or you can always do an exposure lock on the sky and fill flash if need be!
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Question DRO ... what does it do for you?

    Well ... DRO is "Dynamic Range Optimizing." Basically, it allows the camera to optimize the exposure on the sensor and render the shadow areas lighter and the highlight areas darker ... making for a, hopefully, more "balanced" looking exposure, where you can see a lot more detail all over. It is a function that you would use in difficult lighting situations, such as a sunny day when you have a bright sky and you're shooting people in the shade.

    The dynamic range of human sight is amazing; you can easily see both in the shadows as well as the intensely bright sky, and all looks like a perfect mix. However, the camera's dynamic range is far more limited in its ability to do this. The camera can meter either for the sky, or the shadows, but its not wide enough to do BOTH. In a way, the sensor does not have as wide a contrast range as your eye. However, the DRO feature of your camera (particularly on the α700) allows the camera to more easily capture those dark and bright tones. And yours is slightly adjustable, so you can experiment. Just be careful shooting closeups of people with the DRO in "Advanced", as skin tones will look more washed out than normal.

    Remember: The DRO function only works in JPEG capture (where the camera does 50% of the processing of the image before you ever see it). RAW will ignore the DRO setting completely, as RAW is a "non-processed" file format and these adjustments have to be done in post-processing.

    As previously stated, the α700 does a much better job with this, of course, because the A100 was simply a "prototype" camera when released, with this effectively new feature still being developed (pardon the pun). And don't get me me wrong about the α100 ... it was what it was ... a temporary bridge camera from Minolta 5D to the SONY α700.

    The α700 was the finalized version of that design, with ALL the bells and whistles. The DRO setting, alone, has seven settings to use.

    As for D-R in your camera (α100), the best way to see its effect is to simply:
    1. Turn the function knob (left one) to "D-R"
    2. Set D-R to "Off"
    3. Take a "well lit" (direct sunshine should be a good choice) shot of something
    4. Press the Fn button again and select D-R to "Standard"
    5. Take the same shot, at the same settings
    6. Press the Fn button again and select D-R to "Advanced"
    7. Take the same shot, at the same settings
    8. Review the three images ... and look for the detail in the highlights and the shadows.


    With any luck, you should notice an improvement of the overall shot. It is a judgmental feature, because you know what you are trying to achieve. You need some extreme lighting to make use of it. The implementation in the α100 is rather crude ... and nowhere near the ability of the α700. The α700 does this to a much deeper level and it can be impressive. I just figure since you are experimenting, this might be a place you could explore for some additional camera response.

    How's that for an explanation?
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-05-2009 at 11:06 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    80
    Thanks for the input Don! I always love learning new stuff. It's amazing what I have gradually picked up here and there since I have owned my camera...
    I don't know if anyone else is this way but, when I look at other people's vacation pics I am like "thats good" (with a slightly sarcastic voice). I know my pictures are FAR from professional however, I feel like they are better than average though.
    Thanks again for the input!!!

    Chris

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    Well, Chris, there's no reason not to try and get the camera to do the work for you, if possible. Knowing and recognizing the issues you have at hand ... and knowing your tools, make for a better and more satisfying result, in my opinion. Once you have this knowledge, your "work flow" for each image becomes much more routine and a lot less overhead.

    I really enjoyed the SONY α100 (July 2006) before I got the α700 (Sept 2007), more than a full year later. I used it directly against the much more refined Canon EOS 20D (Oct 2005) ... and with the internal α100's stability ... there were shots I just could NOT take with the EOS 20D, handheld.

    I urge you to give D-R a chance ... and see what it can do. It actually may offer no improvement to the image, but nothing ventured ...
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-05-2009 at 10:54 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    80
    I finally got around to touching up the pic (rope in background). I thought I would post it to see if anyone likes the picture any better now. Let me know.


    Also, on the wireless shutter release be sure to buy extra batteries for the transmitter and receiver, mine went dead fairly quick....





  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    You definitely got some "color" with this one, Chris. Might try to tone down the saturation just a smidge.

    "No rope" is definitely the way to go.

    Sorry to hear about that wireless release ... and its susceptible power supply. Cripes ... that's not so good. Sounds kind of like the Pocketwizard IIs (wireless remote flash triggers) ... they're on 24/7 ... unless you throw the power switches to "OFF". At least their LEDs flash to let you know they are both "ON" and talking to one another.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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