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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    80

    Question Suggestions Please...

    My wife and I are going to the beach this weekend for a short vacation (before the new baby gets here in about 6 months). We plan on going to the beach to take some self-portraits. I am wondering if anyone has any suggestions to "sand-proofing" my camera. Also, are DSLR's more/less prone to sand intrusion. Since there are fewer openings than a film SLR (film door) I would assume it would be a little less likely to have a problem. But, I do not want to take a chance. I plan on going straight to the beach with the camera, tri-pod and handy wireless release and shooting the pics, then returning back to the room. I don't want to carry the camera bag and risk sitting it down and picking up 3 gallons of sand. Those of you who have been to the beach know what I am talking about.

    Again, any suggestions would be much appreciated.


    Thanks,
    Chris

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    As long as you aren't changing lenses, I think you sohuld be just fine. I would suggest probably sticking with the kit lens (would be easiest). The G however, might make for some nicer portraits, isolate your subject, and result in a sharper image. The kit lens though would allow you to go wide and come in tight so you can see the beach. After all, you might as well capture the surroundings to make it unique. Good luck!
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    P&S ... and hand it off the the wife when you get back. DSLRs and sand ... mutually exclusive, in my estimation.

    The only sand I want to see is "optical quality sand" as it is being made into a lens ...
    Last edited by DonSchap; 04-28-2009 at 08:24 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    I bring my camera to the beach all the time as long as it is not windy. I don't change lenses. Go early in the morning or late in the afternoon for the best light. Post some images.

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    92
    If you want to take a better lense make sure you have a filter on it. That way you protect the lense glass from any blowing sand and as they said don't change lenses.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,760
    Leave it home and bring a w150 or something...

    UNLESS YOU ARE PLANING ON PRINTING OUT HUGE PICTURES WHAT IS THE POINT OF RISKING IT

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    yeah I don't think you'll have any major problems unless your setting down your camera in the sand.... duh.

    Just leave a filter and lens on it and you should be fine, put the camera in a bag when you're not using it.
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

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