Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    60

    Tamron Lens DX or FX format?

    Hi, Im Ken and I am new to photography. I recently bought a nikon d90 with the kit lens. I also just bought a Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 about 1 week ago. I was wondering if this lens will work with a FX camera? Why? because I think in the future (not anytime soon) I might want to upgrade to FX format.

    How come we cannot use a DX lens on a FX camera? I know that Nikon makes DX and FX lens. Can I use a FX lens for a DX camera? I want to be able to use the lens I buy for my D90 and my future full frame camera.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Small Town, Deep South
    Posts
    169
    Has everything to do with the size of the glass. FX sensors are larger than DX sensors (By 50%). DX made lenses are obviously built to a smaller sensor size, so they are smaller themselves, cheaper, less weight etc etc.

    By putting too small a glass on a FX sensor, you will create a ring around the sensor that no light is getting too, as their is no glass in front of it. Some FX camera's (Like the D3) have a "DX" mode, where they only use the DX size portion of the sensor to maintain compatibility. But at that point, you've lost most of the point of having a FX sensor.

    FX glass works on DX bodies just fine (and some argue, better... but i won't get into that) because their is plenty of glass in front of the sensor. Thus these lenses are heavier, larger, more expensive etc etc.


    Hope this helps!
    Nikon D90 : Nikkor 80-200mm f2.8 AF : Nikkor 18-55mm AF-S DX : Nikkor 50mm 1.8 AF : 2x SB900 : Nikkor 35mm 1.8 AF-S : Total Noob : Tips Appreciated! Flickr! Blog!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by N.C.F. View Post
    Has everything to do with the size of the glass. FX sensors are larger than DX sensors (By 50%). DX made lenses are obviously built to a smaller sensor size, so they are smaller themselves, cheaper, less weight etc etc.

    By putting too small a glass on a FX sensor, you will create a ring around the sensor that no light is getting too, as their is no glass in front of it. Some FX camera's (Like the D3) have a "DX" mode, where they only use the DX size portion of the sensor to maintain compatibility. But at that point, you've lost most of the point of having a FX sensor.

    FX glass works on DX bodies just fine (and some argue, better... but i won't get into that) because their is plenty of glass in front of the sensor. Thus these lenses are heavier, larger, more expensive etc etc.


    Hope this helps!
    yes, it helps. But how about the Tamron lens are thye built for the DX or FX sensore or both? For example, my next lens will be the 70-200mm f/2.8. I do not want to spend the money if I have to end up selling the lens to get another one when I do go FX format. I have also see online that people taken pic with the Tamron 70-200 f/2.8 lens on a D90 and D700.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Small Town, Deep South
    Posts
    169
    Quote Originally Posted by KenRC51 View Post
    yes, it helps. But how about the Tamron lens are thye built for the DX or FX sensore or both? For example, my next lens will be the 70-200mm f/2.8. I do not want to spend the money if I have to end up selling the lens to get another one when I do go FX format. I have also see online that people taken pic with the Tamron 70-200 f/2.8 lens on a D90 and D700.
    Tamron differentiates it's lenses by Di, or Digitally Integrated, and Di-II for Digital SLR's Only.

    To make things simple for you. Di = FX & DX along with film, Di-II = only DX and other crop sensors.
    In this case, your 17-50 is DX only, but the 70-200 is for both DX and FX.
    Nikon D90 : Nikkor 80-200mm f2.8 AF : Nikkor 18-55mm AF-S DX : Nikkor 50mm 1.8 AF : 2x SB900 : Nikkor 35mm 1.8 AF-S : Total Noob : Tips Appreciated! Flickr! Blog!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by N.C.F. View Post
    Tamron differentiates it's lenses by Di, or Digitally Integrated, and Di-II for Digital SLR's Only.

    To make things simple for you. Di = FX & DX along with film, Di-II = only DX and other crop sensors.
    In this case, your 17-50 is DX only, but the 70-200 is for both DX and FX.
    wow, thank you very much. This really clears things up. Man I was hoping that the 17-50 would work for my future FX camera. Since the 70-200 works for DX and FX I feel alot better if I do buy it. Any suggestions on the Tamron 70-200 f/2.8? You thinks its a good lens? Do I really need the VC (vibration control)? I really like the NIkon lens but its cost too much. Since I am just shooting as a hobby I thinik think it is necessary to spent $1700 on a lens that is not going to make me money.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    483
    Quote Originally Posted by KenRC51 View Post
    wow, thank you very much. This really clears things up. Man I was hoping that the 17-50 would work for my future FX camera. Since the 70-200 works for DX and FX I feel alot better if I do buy it. Any suggestions on the Tamron 70-200 f/2.8? You thinks its a good lens? Do I really need the VC (vibration control)? I really like the NIkon lens but its cost too much. Since I am just shooting as a hobby I thinik think it is necessary to spent $1700 on a lens that is not going to make me money.
    Well when you get the FX camera, just trade in your Tamron 17-50 f2.8 to the Tamron 28-75 f2.8 or anything similar in focal length (if you have extra cash, go for the Nikon 24-70 f2.8). The ones you have now are great to start with.
    Nikon D700 | Nikon D90 | 14-24mm 2.8 | 24-70mm 2.8 | 35mm 1.8 | 50mm 1.4 | 85mm 1.4 | 105mm 2.8 Micro | 70-300mm VR | SB-800s | Tiffen UV Filter, ND and Polarizer set

    "You see, Netherlands is this make-believe place where Peter Pan and Tinkerbell come from."
    Joey Tribbiani


    Visit My Flickin' Flickr Shots | My Blog | My Porto-folio (requires Flash)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    6,931
    Quote Originally Posted by KenRC51 View Post
    I really like the NIkon lens but its cost too much. Since I am just shooting as a hobby I thinik think it is necessary to spent $1700 on a lens that is not going to make me money.
    Sorry but to use modern parlance there seems to be a disconnect here.
    Everybody else I have ever heard talk about going to FX is doing it for one reason - image quality.
    You can't have image quality with budget lenses it just does not happen despite what we all wish so the concept of skimping on the glass then adding an FX body doesn't work for me.
    The route that most serious people take is to over time acquire the best glass they can as a long term investment. Great glass is great glass but bodies come and go.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by K1W1 View Post
    Sorry but to use modern parlance there seems to be a disconnect here.
    Everybody else I have ever heard talk about going to FX is doing it for one reason - image quality.
    You can't have image quality with budget lenses it just does not happen despite what we all wish so the concept of skimping on the glass then adding an FX body doesn't work for me.
    The route that most serious people take is to over time acquire the best glass they can as a long term investment. Great glass is great glass but bodies come and go.
    K1W1, what you are saying is totally true. I am not a fan for buying generic product in anything I have owned. Like I said earlier I do not take photos for a living there where I really need the best quality lens and images. The price of the Nikon lens does not compensated for the image quality IMO. IMO, the picture quality from my new 17-50mm seems fine to me. But I will probably consider the Nikon 24-70 f/2.8 since I know I will be using those zoom range more often then the 70-200.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Bay Area, California
    Posts
    1,546
    I would only worry about switching to FX when and if you decide to make photography more than a hobby. You've got a good deal of camera in your hands right now and I cant imagine it not being able to deliver for you anytime soon. If you think your going to get serious anytime down the line then your wasting your money with budget lenses.. Spend the money on good glass now or spend it later.. Either way its going to be spent so why not now? Why not get the best out of your D90 while you are using it?
    Nikon D90, D40 Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 | Sigma 50-150mm f/2.8 | Nikkor 35mm f/1.8
    Vertical Grip, SB-600, SB-24, Sunpak 433D, Metz 40AF-4N, Alienbees CyberSync Triggers

    R3G Media | Flickr

    "You're pulling some awesome action shots with a cam and lens that are supposed to be rubbish ! " - Rooz

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by r3g View Post
    I would only worry about switching to FX when and if you decide to make photography more than a hobby. You've got a good deal of camera in your hands right now and I cant imagine it not being able to deliver for you anytime soon. If you think your going to get serious anytime down the line then your wasting your money with budget lenses.. Spend the money on good glass now or spend it later.. Either way its going to be spent so why not now? Why not get the best out of your D90 while you are using it?
    True, but how often do lens get updated? I know I probably will got go FX for at least 2-3 years. Im concern that if I do get the nikon 70-200 f/2.8, it will get update before I go FX or even shortly after. Then I really would of regret buying the lens. If a lens like the nikon 70-200 gets updated, what would you think they would change or add spec wise?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •