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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Improving technique with your new SONY DSLR

    I am starting this thread to kind of eliminate trying to compete with the other manufacturer's forums in offering suggestions for use of the SONY DSLRS, so do not assume you cannot do this with any other camera.

    Since the track season and other outdoor sports are beginning up, again, I figure I wanted to cover the technique of panning.

    Generally speaking, here are five simple tips for PANNING
    1. Panning requires a steady hand (or mobile tripod head) and a relatively slow shutter speed. You also may want to shut off "SSS" (Super SteadyShot) for this one.

      The actual shutter speed depends on the speed of the subject but generally it will be 1/200th or slower. 1/200th if your subject is really flying along, like a speeding car on a race track, and maybe as slow as 1/40th of a second if your subject is a runner on a track. It also works best if the subject crosses in front of you on a horizontal motion. Another trick in panning is to position yourself where the background is cluttered. A plain background doesn't produce the motion effect as much as a cluttered background.
    2. Keep in mind that the faster your shutter speed is the easier it will be to keep your subject crisp.

      Especially as you’re learning the art of panning, don’t slow your shutter down too much. Just keep it slow enough to begin to show some motion. As your confidence increases and you’ve got the hang of things, go ahead and slow your shutter more and more to show even further pronounced motion and thus separation of your speeding subject from the background.
    3. Make sure your subject remains in the same portion of the frame during the entire exposure: this will ensure a crisp, sharp subject.
    4. Remember that the faster your subject is moving the more difficult it will be to pan.

      This point goes right along with number 3. It’s harder to keep your subject in the same portion of the frame if it’s moving faster than you are able to. So again, start with something a little slower and then progress from there.
    5. Have fun with this technique. Stick to it and improve it with time. It can make for some very dynamic-looking images that will be your first prizes of this "moving" season.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  2. #2
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    thanks for the tip Don. I have always wanted to try panning.
    Can this be done without a tripod?
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elisha82 View Post
    Can this be done without a tripod?
    Sure ... in fact, more often than not. The secret is in "maintaining" the same plane as the subject you are panning on. Remember to finish through the shot ... waiting a moment or two after you hear the shutter close before relaxing your stance and follow-through while training on the subject.

    Another secret, if your subject should happen to be close enough, is to use a rear-sync flash*. That can really nail your subject crisply, without seriously affecting the background.

    * Do not forget to set the flash mode back to "Fill" flash or whatever your default is, when you are finished.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 03-18-2009 at 08:19 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #4
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    Dec 2007
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    2,562
    Here is a shot I took at the race track that I tried to pan. Good mini tutorial Don.
    Frank

    Sony A77
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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  5. #5
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    Dec 2006
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    thats a great shot frank. my panning skills suck.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Thanks Rooz
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  7. #7
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    Cool Lest we forget ...

    Quote Originally Posted by sparkie1263 View Post
    Here is a shot I took at the race track that I tried to pan. Good mini tutorial Don.
    A terrific shot to demonstrate. Thanks, Frank, as I just would like people to get the most out of their DSLRs and not forget some basic techniques that can provide rather remarkable results.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  8. #8
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    Guelph, Ontario
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    what was the shutter speed on that Frank?
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Sorry I should have posted it.

    Frank

    Camera Make: SONY
    Camera Model: DSLR-A100
    Image Date: 2008:08:23 02:06:59
    Flash Used: No
    Focal Length: 70.0mm (35mm equivalent: 105mm)
    Exposure Time: 0.0031 s (1/320)
    Aperture: f/8.0
    ISO equiv: 200
    Exposure Bias: 0.30
    White Balance: Auto
    Metering Mode: Center Weight
    Exposure: aperture priority (semi-auto)
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    It's an OK pic, Frank but needed a tad more exposure and is not quite there for the panning technique so ably described by Don. Like Don said, you need to slow the shutter.
    Your shot doesn't quite freeze the action whereas 1/500 at f5.6 might.
    It doesn't blur the background enough to give the impression of speed. 1/125th at f16 would create the background blur and introduce more into the legs and hooves. ISO100 1/125th at f8 if your lens has diffraction problems at f16.

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