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  1. #41
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    Red face Geez, it's never done

    Quote Originally Posted by laydros View Post
    I was referring to a part that is similar to that slave trigger, but has a standard hot-shoe on the bottom. That allows a Minolta flash to plug into a standard hot-shoe. I only found one on ebay, and it looked chinzey.

    I'm familiar with the Minolta camera to hot-shoe adapter. Minolta even made an OEM one for a while, so I expect they are made fairly well.

    Edit: Right after I hit post I got an email that this was relisted: Hot Shoe Adapter for Sony & Minolta Flash

    Well, Gadget Infinity covers the one you describe, also ... I did not include it ... but, hey, here it is: SKU number DICFLAADA1200 which is equivalent to Minolta's original FS-1200.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 03-12-2009 at 06:00 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by laydros View Post
    The 42's head not swiveling is a bummer, and the lack of manual controls on the 36. But the real issue is the proprietary hot shoe. With a pocket wizard, or the cheap ebay triggers you are using the hot shoe or pc cable. I think the 56 and 58 at least have pc sockets, but you have to use an adapter for the others.

    From what little I have read, it appears that Minolta has the best wireless system, which is nice, but there are times that you are outside in the sun, or around a corner or something when the Minolta wireless system will not work.

    The hot shoe is BETTER than the standard hot shoe, but its non-standard. In a better universe the others would have adapted Minolta's superior hot shoe. Its easier to work with, and less likey to get loose. The standard hot shoe is several decades old. But they didn't, so any umbrella stands or wireless systems or other stuff are made for the standard hot shoe.

    I did find adapters from Minolta flash to standard shoe on ebay, but thats another point of failure....
    The HVL-F42AM has a swivel head.
    It also comes with a mini stand which mounts directly (use the threaded socket) to an Umbrella mount like this one ...
    http://www.adorama.com/LTUSH.html#ReviewHeader ... just take off the removable shoe.

  3. #43
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    Lightbulb Here's an idea of sorts ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Peekayoh View Post
    The HVL-F42AM has a swivel head.
    It also comes with a mini stand which mounts directly (use the threaded socket) to an Umbrella mount
    You know, if you get a tripod-footed monopod ... it makes a dandy portable stand to the flash.

    Attachment 44842
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rooz View Post
    for every brand, for people that have either ALREADY bought a camera or are looking for one, the least experienced buyers do NOT realise that IS does not freeze motion so does NOT produce the best shots in low light. that isnt cos they're stupid, its just cos they dont think about it. they just think "image stabilised" then they get blurry pics and wonder wtf is going on.

    hell, we have experienced phtoographers here that still oversell IS. if Don was a salesmen in a store, he would be selling the IS to newbies and they would ALL be getting fooled into the advantages of IS. and none of it relates to longer focal length shutter speeds, all of the IS rhetoric is based around low light, slow shutter speeds.

    whether anyone here chooses to deny it or not, entry level dslrs are purchased mostly be the least experienced people and these are the people who are most influenced by marketing, like MP's and anti shake.

    that is not an absolute statement, cos i'm sure there are cashed up amateur hacks that buy D3's but GENERALLY the marketing segement for the entry level is for people new to photography and these are the people most likely to be duped at worst...and misled at worst.
    Rooz mate, you really got to give up on this one. I've never seen Sony claim the SSS to be anything other than "Anti Shake" and if a Salesperson gets a sale by claiming it will stop motion blur then it's a fraudulent sale. On the other hand, "Anti Shake" is a legitimate USP for the Salesperson. Someone looking for a DSLR probably has a P&S and already knows the basics, if not, they've got a lot to learn and not just the difference between camera shake and motion blur.

    Using the potential ignorance of a punter to support your flawed argument about the uselessness (not) of SSS is a non-starter.

  5. #45
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    Oct 2008
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    Raleigh, NC, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    You know, if you get a tripod-footed monopod ... it makes a dandy portable stand to the flash.

    Attachment 44842
    I like that dual use Don. I currently have a cheapy tiny tripod that certainly couldn't support my slr to use for off camera flash, but I need to find a couple more stands.

    Sorry about being wrong on the 42, I thought it tilted up and down, but the head didn't swivel left and right. Does it have manual controls though?
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

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  6. #46
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    Dec 2006
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    Guelph, Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by laydros View Post
    Sorry about being wrong on the 42, I thought it tilted up and down, but the head didn't swivel left and right. Does it have manual controls though?

    as far as i know it does. only the 36 is limited in features.
    Canon EOS 7D

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    FLUIDR

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    You know, if you get a tripod-footed monopod ... it makes a dandy portable stand to the flash.

    Attachment 44842
    Yeah, and when someone sneezes, you've got a busted flash.

  8. #48
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    Lightbulb A weighty issue

    Quote Originally Posted by Peekayoh View Post
    Yeah, and when someone sneezes, you've got a busted flash.
    Lighting is one of the biggest potential problems you can have in photography. "Subjects" invariably seem to find a way to locate the cables and ... timber! The beauty of this particular idea is that there are NO cables (AC or sync). Throw a decent-sized sand bag on the stand's feet and it is almost invulnerable to tipping. Personally, I find that quite helpful using the electronic flashes in SLAVE mode.

    Just don't forget the sand bag! I keep two canvas-covered ones in the back of the truck. No point lugging them back and forth from the house.

    The best part of this idea is that the monopod can be extended from three-feet up to nearly six-feet, getting that flash right where you want it.

    I also have mounted a RC2 plate in the tripod screw-post hole at bottom of the flash foot.

    That way, the flash foot locks into all my tripods, the monopod or anything else using the RC2 quick-release system.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 03-13-2009 at 09:39 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #49
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    The HVL-F42AM has full manual control with 6-step power settings (1/1-1/32) and Auto and manual zoom control.
    It also comes with a mini stand which will screw directly into an Umbrella mount.

    Don, I've nowt agin a bit of ingenuity and I agree, in a home studio setup, a couple of sandbags will no doubt stabilise the monopod. Chances are you won't be in your home studio and and a couple of sandbags can be a bit of a drag; also those monopod feet are quite flimsy and may not take kindly to the weight.

    A purpose made stand gives the required stability and a height of 90"-155". If you're on location, maybe using manual flash, you need to be able to easily reposition the stand to correct or change the lighting, the last thing you want is to be juggling sandbags, not for the sake of $35 anyway ... http://www.adorama.com/Search-Result...it%20COR%20750

  10. #50
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    I rarely take my lighting stands into the field. God knows I have plenty. They are truly weighty and I always have the Manfrotto 682 monopod. As a convenience issue, it is the way I go. I assure you that those "little legs" are more than study enough to support the monopod and the 15 oz flash attached to it.

    Do you honestly lug lighting stands strapped to your backpack? Man, that has got to be a gut-buster and the last thing I want is that kind extra weight, when I am tromping around. I admit the sand bags are used when the shooting is a little less mobile. And if things really settle down for a shoot, yes, out come the lighting stands and the heavy duty flash systems.

    Attachment 44850
    You can see the sand bag holding down this background-strobe stand


    Flexibility, in my estimation, is key to it all. We are a little off track with this, from SONY's original 12% DSLR marketshare and this is pretty generic lighting stuff. SO, perhaps we should either start another thread to hash it out or just drop it.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 03-13-2009 at 11:14 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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