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View Poll Results: What was your slowest, handheld, successful looking SSS-shot?

Voters
7. You may not vote on this poll
  • 1/40

    2 28.57%
  • 1/30

    0 0%
  • 1/25

    1 14.29%
  • 1/20

    0 0%
  • 1/15

    2 28.57%
  • 1/13

    0 0%
  • 1/10

    0 0%
  • 1/8

    0 0%
  • 1/5

    1 14.29%
  • Slower & I will decribe the experience in the thread

    1 14.29%
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Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Question What is your SLOWEST SSS-shot, that worked?

    One of the things that seems to be hotly debated is how helpful Super SteadyShot has been with your particular SONY DSLR. In fact, it can be the breaking point between going with a SONY DSLR and ... something else.

    Normally, any handheld image shot below 1/60 with a 50mm lens, on a non-stablized camera or lens is subject to noticeable camera shake. Once stability is added, the chances are that without changing any of the other exposure settings, you can drop that speed to roughly 1/15 second.

    Arguably, there are some who cannot and some that can go all the way to 1/5 second. Honestly, this is a the ragged edge of Image Stability and almost defeats the purpose. Its intent is to alleviate the need for tripod support for routine, well lit images. Shooting images in low light is challenging, even with a tripod.

    With all that being said, this poll is to determine "How slow you have gone, indoors, under normal lighting (w/o a flash) and still gotten a sharp image for your SONY DSLR." You should be able to review your saved shots and determine the settings from the associated EXIF Data accompanying the shot. To read EXIF data with Explorer, on your PC, simply locate the file, right click on it, select "Properties" and the "Summary" tab in the "Properties" window.

    Just be honest with your response, as we are not setting any records here, just an operational expectation from "the group."

    Thank you for your participation
    Last edited by DonSchap; 03-09-2009 at 11:27 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
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    1,903
    by worked, do you mean acceptable for a 8x10 or tack sharp at 100% crop?
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554
    Yes ... not to be cute, but a usable frame. Great question for clarification. If you choose, you can explain what it was you were going for when it worked out for you. You might even post the shot.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,760
    i sware sometimes it makes things worse..its like haveing you film bouncing around while you are trying to take a picture..

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554
    You need to watch the scale ... because if you just throw up the camera and shoot, SSS does not kick in properly. It requires you stabilize yourself and then allow the camera to keep up.

    I have no idea how you shoot, but that's my experience with it.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
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    10,421
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    One of the things that seems to be hotly debated is how helpful Super SteadyShot has been with your particular SONY DSLR. In fact, it can be the breaking point between going with a SONY DSLR and ... something else.

    Normally, any handheld image shot below 1/60 with a 50mm lens, on a non-stablized camera or lens is subject to noticeable camera shake. Once stability is added, the chances are that without changing any of the other exposure settings, you can drop that speed to roughly 1/15 second.

    Arguably, there are some who cannot and some that can go all the way to 1/5 second. Honestly, this is a the ragged edge of Image Stability and almost defeats the purpose. Its intent is to alleviate the need for tripod support for routine, well lit images. Shooting images in low light is challenging, even with a tripod.
    ***sigh***

    there has NEVER been a debate on how helpful SSS is. everyone agrees that any form of image stabilisation is a good thing. the debate, if you could call it that, is how helpful the actual shutter speed is in most real life situations. ie: what are you taking photos of where 1/5s actually gets you a shot worth a damn ?

    so, while another poll may be entertaining to you, i'm more interested to see the shots themselves. trinket shots dont impress me.
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Des Plaines, IL
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    You know, DCRP really does need to organize a regional shoot, where the various groups get together and do a photographic safari. That would be a true test of one system versus another, having the same scene or situation to image.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,421
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    That would be a true test of one system versus another, having the same scene or situation to image.
    no, it would be a true test of one person versus another. the most important tool in photography is whats behind the camera, not whats inside it.
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    9,554
    I believe in the 3-m's of success ... Man, Moment and Machine. You put all three together and you can make some magic ... so do it to it and allow SONY's SSS ... to be the mortar for the bricks.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    SSS is useful, but like Rooz says, it is only good for stationary objects.
    i've had several shots at 1/5th @ ISO 1600 that look good enough for an 8x10 but at the same time i wish i could get cleaner ISO 3200 or higher shots to gain faster shutter speed as well.
    in my case, hand shake is not the problem. it is more so trying to freeze the motion.

    obviously i can't have both based on the current systems out there presently, so i'll take SSS only for now since i've already invested in Sony.
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

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