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View Poll Results: Should ISO be “automatically” calculated in the MANUAL Mode? (SONY does not)

Voters
14. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I believe it should be a menu option

    5 35.71%
  • No, MANUAL Mode means “manual”

    7 50.00%
  • Undecided

    0 0%
  • This aspect bothers me so much that I am going to another manufacturer.

    2 14.29%
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Results 41 to 50 of 66

Thread: Iso - auto

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post

    Try as you will ... I am sticking with SONY, until they quit making it.
    I have no problem with that, as I stated above, I could care less what you shoot with. I don't want you to change systems, shoot with Sony, I don't care. In fact I want you to shoot with a Sony. Shoot away, post your shots, be proud, just realize EVERY system has it's drawbacks, and every system has it's positives. Lambasting someone's system, or choices made within a given system is no way to make friends. Skewing facts, leaving out details, posting shots that prove my points, is no way to promote your system. You've created the spotlight shining on your glass house, you'll have to live in it.

    All systems are just as capable of taking photos that are just as good as the photos taken with the Sony system. We all have to work within the constraints of the system we have chosen. I have a Canon, why? because I bought an AE-1 in 1981, and when I looked for a digital camera, Canon was leader. Nikon makes the best body now, Canon has had numerous blunders in recent releases, and Sony is proving to be as expensive if not more expensive than either Canon or Nikon. What's the point? Each system is great, takes great photographs, and carries equal weight. Despite what you think your system is not superior, and Tamron glass is certainly not superior.
    A good photograph is knowing where to stand.
    Ansel Adams

    Rule books are paper, they will not cushion a sudden meeting of stone and metal.
    Ernest K. Gann-Fate is the Hunter.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    And I admit, Jim, you were oh-so-right about the contest. Shooting at 1/15th of a second was far too easy. I am willing to up the ante ... just to be a good sport. I admit it was a lot more fun with someone less controlled with their breathing and hold. I am sure the youngin's are getting a kick out of watching two battleaxe's go after it.
    You've already proven that 1/10 is too slow even for a stabilized body. So now what?
    A good photograph is knowing where to stand.
    Ansel Adams

    Rule books are paper, they will not cushion a sudden meeting of stone and metal.
    Ernest K. Gann-Fate is the Hunter.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    BTW: In other words, this was no oversight, as you seem to want to describe it. What part of deceitful is that? Heck ... I'll show you the page upon which it is written.
    i believe you. its poorly implemented.
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  4. #44
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    Feb 2006
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    9,560

    Stable relations ...

    Quote Originally Posted by TenD View Post
    You've already proven that 1/10 is too slow even for a stabilized body. So now what?
    Look, even stabilization depends on distance ... focal length and just plain physical conditioning. Every shot can be a winner or a loser, depending on these factors, so I accept that you need to be a little tighter on your skills at low light and slow shutter, given identical ISO. You may just hit 5 out of 10 times. That's not important. What is important is that you enjoy your camera system, for whatever it provides you. I, too, have had my system for a long, long time. I know it can deliver the goods. I am comfortable using the 25 year old Minolta AF 50mm f/1.4 lens. It is one of the lenses that clearly and sharply made the trip to the twenty-first century, along with the Minolta 28mm f/2.8 and the Minolta 24mm f/2.8. The 35-70mm f/4 ... not so much. There was no 85mm f/1.4 or 135mm f/1.8 when I first got the Minolta Maxxum. In fact, the screw drive is so torqued up on the newer digital camera bodies, it quickly overpowers many of the older third party film-lenses. They simply were not designed to handle that snappy of a focus. An improvement? Sure ... newer lenses rip from one focal extreme to the other. Most Minolta lenses can handle it. Some others, turned into so many shredded parts.

    Concerning the ISO- AUTO ... just so we are clear on this: If you leave your A700 camera in ISO-AUTO, in one of the other modes (P, A, S) and switch the Mode Dial to "M" (Manual), the ISO defaults to 200. If you want something else, you will need to adjust it MANUALLY.

    See how I cleverly tucked that inside? I am such a radical force on this web page. I actually want people to shoot better. Shameful, I know.

    BTW: SONY-shooters ... the "Camera-shake warning" indicator does not appear when you are in "S" or "M" modes. In other words, you are on your own ... the camera will not warn you of a questionable anti-shake shot in these modes, based on its input from the settings you or the camera has automatically chosen. It will still compensate for stability, but you need to watch the "SSS scale", in the viewfinder, closely. When it minimizes ... gently press the shutter release.

    For more on this, please read the orange covered, "Read This First", step 5, for the A700 ...
    pages 45-46 in the Instructional Manual for the A300/A350 and
    page 46 of the Instruction Manual for the A900.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 03-09-2009 at 01:16 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr® & Sdi

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    Look, even stabilization depends on distance ... focal length and just plain physical conditioning. Every shot can be a winner or a loser, depending on these factors, so I accept that you need to be a little tighter on your skills at low light and slow shutter, given identical ISO. You may just hit 5 out of 10 times. That's not important. What is important is that you enjoy your camera system, for whatever it provides you.
    Yes. I wholeheartedly agree. You have to have the skills in the first place. IS, SSS, etc. just make the game a little easier. SSS makes it easier to get the photo, but shouldn't be relied on to get the photo. It's the icing on the cake, but not a be all end all. Everyone should practice holding their camera steady as they possibly can, whether or not they have SSS, IS, OS, etc. It's wonderful technology and definitely helpful, but it also has huge limitations and shouldn't be relied on.
    A good photograph is knowing where to stand.
    Ansel Adams

    Rule books are paper, they will not cushion a sudden meeting of stone and metal.
    Ernest K. Gann-Fate is the Hunter.

  6. #46
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    Oct 2008
    Location
    Indiana, USA
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    52
    Makes no difference to me I never use auto iso anyway.
    Sony α900
    Zeiss 16-35mm f/2.8, Zeiss 24-70mm f/2.8, Sony 70-200 F/2.8 G, Sony 100mm F/2.8 Macro

  7. #47
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    Jun 2008
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    LOL, I thought this thread was just about done when I left last night (page 2), guess I was wrong.....
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  8. #48
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    Oct 2008
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    I don't have time to read through all of this right now, but here's my $0.02. There are 3 things that control exposure, shutter, aperture, and exposure. ISO isn't really a "creative" control (except for grain) so there is no reason for an ISO priority mode. Therefore the existing PASM are good, but there should be a menu selection to either set the ISO you want, or set the range of ISOs that you want for any of the manual modes. I love the idea of locking in the shutter and aperture you want on M, and then letting the ISO adjust (in those less than full stop increments available on the A700 and other mid-range cameras) for the light.
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

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  9. #49
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    Going above ISO-800, on some models is a little ... derogatory to the image. I'm not sure I want the camera making that call auto-magically. It would be interesting to get the engineering side of the decision. Even in the A900, this is not an option (See page 55 of Instruction Manual)
    Last edited by DonSchap; 03-09-2009 at 10:49 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr® & Sdi

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    Going above ISO-800, on some models is a little ... derogatory to the image. I'm not sure I want the camera making that call auto-magically. It would be interesting to get the engineering side of the decision. Even in the A900, this is not an option (See page 55 of Instruction Manual)
    Which is why you set a RANGE that you are willing for it to work in. Like I said in the POTD thread earlier, I think some mid-range cameras will let you set this. So if I determine I am in a fairly dark place with mixed lighting, like the set I did at dinner with friends a couple of weeks ago, I set the range for 400-1600. I set my aperture for 3.5 to get a decent DOF, and shutter to 1/60 to cut motion blur down, then let the camera handle the ISO. I would rather a shot be underexposed than get the noise of ISO 3200, so when my subject is poorly lit, it will go no higher than 1600, but when I point it at another person, who happens to be facing a light source, it will drop it to ISO 400 and capture a pretty noise-free image.

    I guess the really important thing is a max, more than a minimum.
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

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