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View Poll Results: What kind of SONY/Minolta SLR/DSLR are you using?

Voters
35. You may not vote on this poll
  • A100

    6 17.14%
  • A200

    7 20.00%
  • A300

    6 17.14%
  • A350

    8 22.86%
  • A700

    7 20.00%
  • A900

    3 8.57%
  • Ax00 - New Model

    0 0%
  • Minolta 35mm-film SLR (please specify model in thread)

    3 8.57%
  • Minolta DSLR (please specify model in thread)

    0 0%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Results 31 to 40 of 63
  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,161
    LOL I get the reference Don
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
    Tokina AF 28-70mm F/3.5-4.5
    Tokina AF AT-X 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6
    http://flickr.com/

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    Honestly, for the most part, it has been a real pleasure shooting with the SONY system. I find myself relatively safe when I swing up the ol' rig and take the shot ... it looks relatively stable (if I am not too overly aggressive), well focused and offers excellent color (provided I do not use the "kit" lens.)

    The best part is having a "stabilized" TAMRON SP AF 200-500mm f/5-6.3 Di LD shot. That just wasn't possible with my last DSLR brand (name withheld to avoid ticking off the neighbors). Long lenses are a real pain at 1/250 sec or slower, and not having stability for it. It almost demands a tripod for a proper shot, handheld. I fought tooth and nail before the SONY Super SteadyShot to get one. Now ... I can! Even the SONY/Minolta Autofocus 500mm f/8 Reflex, as light as it is, can survive and provide excellent results at the slower speeds.

    I hope everyone else is enjoying SSS with their SONY DSLR. It may one of the best parts of owning one.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    76
    Hi guys, I am new here too.

    I am in Holland and it`s not easy making good pictures here. It`s most of the time gray and raining. We only got one season and it starts 1st January and ends 31rd December. I used to live in South Africa and I go there a lot on holliday and thats where I can make nice wild life photos

    Why Sony? If you open my front door then everything is Sony. Flat screen, surround, blue ray and a lot more. I like the SSS that`s why I got Sony and decided on the A300 because its about the same as the A350`only a lot cheaper.

    Apart from my gear (below) I got a wireless remote and a cheap tripot but it`s doing it`s job. The remote is very nice and a must.

    I am new with DSLR so there is a lot that I can learn here.

    Future gear will be a good flash and a good allround lens with macro so I can leave the kit lens at home. A700 will be on my wish list too after I win the jackpot. For now I am happy with my A300

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    602

    Talking

    Here we go Don and all of the other Sony users:

    The "D" in my login name is for Darin. My passion is photographing old courthouses and interesting architecture. Not always possible to get inside courthouses with a camera, and when you can it's not always possible or practical to set up a tripod. I had been using a Fujifilm Finepix S5200 5.1mp fixed lens camera. It generally took good quality pictures, but when it came to indoor shots ... blur blur blur ... or really soft images and a lot of noise. So, I wanted to move up to a digital SLR and specifically a full frame because I was tired of crop and trying to judge the image I was snapping with what I could ultimately print. And, since I had no lenses, I had no brand loyalty. So ...

    Why you are using a SONY versus another brand:

    I need image stabilization for a lot of the photos I take. I liked the image stabilization in the camera body and the flexibility it provides to buy non-IS lenses. I liked the idea of potentially picking up some of the Konica-Minolta lenses which my aunt (who worked in photo processing for about 20 years) raved about.

    Add what you are planning to add to your camera (in the near future):

    My first lens was the Tamron SP AF 70-200mm f/2.8 macro. I just got the Sony 50mm f1.4. I was looking at the Sigma 50mm f2.8 macro to give me the option of macro images but opted for the f1.4 for more speed.

    In the upcoming months, I'll be adding flash, battery grip and probably a lens in the wide-angle range and a 500mm+ reflex for the long distance shots.

    What you would like to get from your participation in the forum:

    I like the feed back on issues and quirks people are experiencing with Sony camera functions and lens choices. It's also great to see other people's photography and get new ideas on different ways to capture images.

    Maybe provide the best reason you plan on continuing with your SONY.

    I'm continuing to learn all the various functions the A900 offers. I'm continually amazed.

    Where you are located:

    Pasadena, CA.

    And, I hope we continue to get more participation from Sony owners.
    Darin Wessel
    α 900
    Zooms: Tamron SP AF70-200mm f2.8 Di LD Macro; Sigma 28-90mm D macro, Konica-Minolta 18-70 f3.5-5.6
    Primes: Minolta 28mm f2.8; Sony 50mm f1.4
    Minolta RC-1000 remote commander

    Film:
    Calumet Cambo CC400 4x5 View Camera
    YashikaMat 6x6 TLR (other accessories)
    Minolta Maxxum 7000 w/ Minolta 35-80mm f/4-5.6 & Minolta 2800 flash
    Minolta Maxxum 5000i & Vivitar 728 AFM flash
    What's next???

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    Darin,

    Judging from a few of your comments, I would say looking into a TAMRON SP AF 28-75mm f/2.8 XR Di LD Aspherical (IF) might be worthwhile. Not only is it sharp and relatively bright, for a Zoom lens, but it will not cost a lot. About $369 from B&H. It will offer a lot of flexibility for interior shots, that the fixed focal length 50mm f/1.4 is limited with.

    Since you already own the 70-200mm f/2.8, the 28-75mm f/2.8 also marries right up to it, nicely. A "matched set", to be sure. (Having and routinely using both, myself ) In fact, today, I am "three-lensing" my sling-bag and taking both the f/2.8s, the CZ 135mm f/1.8 and the HVL-F56AM flash to the Cub Scout Pinewood Derby District Finals. Maybe I can get some decent split-time shots, at the Finish Line.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 04-04-2009 at 10:36 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Whiteville, NC
    Posts
    8
    Newbie here folks,

    Just picked up an A350, after my trusty Canon PowerShot A80 bit the dust after nearly 6 years and 6 thousand photos, my wife and I decided that we should be taking better shots of our children. I've wanted to go DSLR for some time now, but now, forced by necessity, I had to go ahead with the purchase.

    So I picked up:

    Sony A350K, with 18-70 Kit Lens... ok so I know I will need to replace this.
    SanDisk Extreme III - 8 GB Compact Flash
    Ape Case - ACPRO1000 - DSLR bag.
    and a Tiffen 55mm UV filter. (Not really sure why I need this yet, but it seems as if nearly everyone has one, and it was only 6 bucks.)

    The case, card and filter should be here Monday.

    We decided on the Sony due to the articulating screen with live view. The old canon had the fully movable LCD and it was one of our priorities when selecting a new brand. I almost waited for the Olympus E-620, but with an upcoming family vacation, I had to bite the bullet. Funny thing is, I've taken 200 photos this week, and only used the live view like 10 times.

    So I need to learn the ropes really quickly, we leave in a week. We will be going to an Atlanta Braves night game, and the Atlanta aquarium. I was at the aquarium 2 years ago and the pics were dismal. Anyone have any good sites with a good run down, on all the settings this camera has? It already takes pics 5 times better than my old canon in auto mode, and I know it can do more.

    I'm not in a position to get a better lens just yet, but know I will need one in the future.

    Well, hello. Im sure I will soon irritate you all with questions. Thanks for a great resource for the new guy.

    Andy
    Last edited by overbyc1; 04-04-2009 at 03:43 PM.
    Sony α350
    Minolta 50mm 1.7
    18-70 Kit Lens

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    not sure how dark the aquarium would be, but don't expect miracle photos since the kit lens is not the brightest one out there. it does however have a very quick AF.
    set the camera to ISO800 and go from there.
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Lightbulb No light and movin'

    Welcome 'overbyc1' ... hope we can help you out.

    Shots through aquarium glass are ... hmmm, what's the word I want here ... oh yeah ... difficult.

    Why? Fingerprints, handptrints and filth! Kids love to touch and pound on the glass ... trying to coax the fish to come closer ... and make "fish eyes" at them. Remember, the most important accessory you can have is a wet rag and some glass cleaner. Do not use the flash ... reflection is terrible and you will probably scare the crap out of the fish. If you had a wireless or offset flash, you might stand a chance, but still, for the most part, forget it. You have what light they provide. Your eyes will automagically adjust ... your camera will not.

    Why are fingerprints a problem? Because, the camera will autofocus on them, due to the backlighting that makes them show up to the camera. You can manually focus on the fish, but the last time I checked, fish were in one place ... NOW ... and another place ... NOW! They move and your manual tracking will be difficult. Autofocus may offer a fighting chance, but it will still be difficult in this diminished lighting scenario you have chosen.

    You must use "predictive focus" which is basically assume the fish is going to be swimming near something in the tank. Pre-Focus on that "something", switch to MF and then just wait for mister fish to swim by it. When he does ... press the shutter release and you should have the shot.

    This is something you can quickly practice at home.
    1. Set your α350's to Manual Mode (M)
    2. Set the White Balance (WB) to Tungsten -2.
    3. Set the ISO = 800
    4. Set the Aperture as wide as your lens will allow.
    5. Place an object in the room, dim the room lights (no daylight) to one or two incandescent bulbs (about 60W each). and focus on it.
    6. Switch to Manual Focus (MF)
    7. Then have your photographic assistant, "lil' Johnnie", walk or run by it.
    8. Just as he gets close enough to your pre-focus point, press the shutter release. (If he walks, your shutter speed with need to be 1/125th sec. If he runs ... 1/500th sec.)


    What this will show you is the problem with low light and moving objects.

    Let us know how this works for ya ... real soon.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 04-04-2009 at 07:08 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Whiteville, NC
    Posts
    8
    Wow,

    Thanks for the advice, I'll be doing some testing tomorrow night, just as you have outlined. I'm a tad bit scared of the manual mode, but I suppose there is no time to learn like the present. I'll let you know how it goes.

    Thanks again.
    Sony α350
    Minolta 50mm 1.7
    18-70 Kit Lens

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    Manual is control over your camera. Embrace the change ... because it is precisely that that gives you "the power" to make this capture.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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