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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    How's the AF speed?
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
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    10,424
    shithouse.
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    2,204
    hmmm it doesn't have an AF limiter, how strange. But I forgot that AF is pretty limited when it comes to macros although sometimes useful.
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    9,560
    I have a technique I have perfected that allows me to use the AF function in combination with Manual Focus. It takes some getting used to, but this is one of the fastest near 200mm PRIME for that kind of money. So, whatever.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    788
    Quote Originally Posted by Rooz View Post
    shithouse.
    I think thats where we will keep hitting the Tamron/Sigma vs. OEM lens issues, esp. on telephoto. Many of the third party glass has incredible IQ, and in many cases the lighter weight is an advantage. But you get what you pay for, albeit with decreasing yield on investment. For CaNikon IS is rare in 3rd party lenses, and in most cases with all manufacturers the autofocus and build quality are inferior on the third party lenses.

    As Don often mentions, that double or triple in price might make it worthwhile for the advanced amateur to look towards third party glass though. In MANY cases IQ is the real issue, autofocus speed, durability, and even IS may not be super important for many cases.

    I'm really interested in your response to the new Sony macro dr4gon. I think we have pretty well decided that the Tamron stuff is great around here, but that says a lot for the Sony 100mm to be such a big difference over the Tamron 90mm.
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    Quote Originally Posted by laydros View Post
    I think thats where we will keep hitting the Tamron/Sigma vs. OEM lens issues, esp. on telephoto. Many of the third party glass has incredible IQ, and in many cases the lighter weight is an advantage. But you get what you pay for, albeit with decreasing yield on investment. For CaNikon IS is rare in 3rd party lenses, and in most cases with all manufacturers the autofocus and build quality are inferior on the third party lenses.

    As Don often mentions, that double or triple in price might make it worthwhile for the advanced amateur to look towards third party glass though. In MANY cases IQ is the real issue, autofocus speed, durability, and even IS may not be super important for many cases.

    I'm really interested in your response to the new Sony macro dr4gon. I think we have pretty well decided that the Tamron stuff is great around here, but that says a lot for the Sony 100mm to be such a big difference over the Tamron 90mm.
    I feel that it is a big difference and well worth it. Just something to consider IMO.

    Here's my review:

    sharpness: 5
    color: 5
    build: 5
    distortion: 5
    flare control: 5


    compared to:
    Tamron 90mm Di SP 1:1 Macro

    positive:
    Fast AF, especially with limit
    Superb sharpness
    Nice MFD

    negative:
    Expensive (but what good glass isn't?)


    This is my new favorite lens. I absolutely love this lens. After getting the 90mm Tamron, I just wasn't too pleased with the lens and was left wanting something better. Well I have found it! The Sony 100mm is well worth the price premium over the Tamron. It is sharper, much faster to focus (on my A300), and has a greater MFD which allows you to back away from the subject while still maintaining the same 1:1 magnification. It is just so incredibly sharp!

    The colors are classic and nice Minolta colors since this was originally a Minolta lens. It feels like a very solid lens, not too heavy, just the right weight. No distortions (it's a 100mm macro lens on an APS-C, duh). I have not had any flare, but this isn't the type of lens you would be shooting landscapes with, although doable. And it does have a nice big hood if you are that worried.

    If you are on the verge of buying the Tamron 90mm, I would hold out for this. It is expensive, but not overpriced IMO. Get one macro lens and get the best!

    I didn't think I could get good macros (when using the Tamron) but this sure has changed all that. It's sharpness and longer MFD are perfect. Now I'm looking at combining a Sony 50mm F/1.4 in front of this to achieve 2:1 magnification . I'm hooked on macros now!
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    2,132
    Quote Originally Posted by Rooz View Post
    shithouse.
    Which is why I didn't buy it...sharp as heck but if it misses AF half the time, and takes too long when it does get it right, my subject has moved. And since a 70-200 lens is most often used for moving objects, that cripples its own purpose.
    Nikon D300 | Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 | Nikkor AF-S 70-300mm VR | Nikkor AF 35mm f/2 D | SB-600 | Lowepro Voyager C | Lowepro Slingshot 300 AW

    For Sale:
    Nikkor AF 35mm f/2 D - Like New (FX compatible)

    Wish List
    Nikkor AF-S 17-55 f/2.8
    Nikkor AF-S 70-200 f/4 VRII
    Tokina AF 11-16 f/2.8
    SB-900 (2)
    Umbrellas
    New Tripod

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    And that's the rub, is it not.
    Most common complaint about this lens is AF problems and "hunting" in low light situations. IQ and sharpness rate well
    Which is why I discounted it in favour of a Sony 70-300G.
    You pay more for f2.8 and then can't use it.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,161
    Ahh, good to see some advice, info. and opinions moving around, mention a lens or two, a brand or two and the responses start to roll, like a forum is supposed to. lots of good information to think over guys, thanks much.
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
    Tokina AF 28-70mm F/3.5-4.5
    Tokina AF AT-X 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6
    http://flickr.com/

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Cool Speed-to-focus ... a high cost commodity?

    You know, you guys tend to forget that manual focus was pretty popular ... not that long ago. Minolta was the powerhouse manufacturer that developed AF for the masses, in the Maxxum series of SLRs.

    Still, for years afterwards, most professional photographers relied on their manual focus cameras to do all the work. Their advantage was specialized "focusing grids" that allowed the photographer to get a crisp image. If you look through today's DSLR viewfinder ... you will notice a complete lack of the aforementioned focusing grid. It interferes with the modern AF sensors, but leaves you rather defenseless when you need to actually go to manual focus, for whatever reason.

    Anyway, speed to focus is relatively a product of the lens drive (either internal to the lens or driven from the camera body) and AF system in use. On the α700 and α900, the TAMRON SP AF 70-200mm f/2.8 Di LD

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    40.6 OZ - M.F.D. = 37.4 in

    actually does better than it does on other camera systems. It uses the cameras lens motor drive and while it is not as quick as the "double-the-cost" SONY AF 70-200mm f/2.8 G SSM,

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    47 OZ - M.F.D. = 48 in

    the TAMRON is significantly lighter and gets a closer shot, by almost a foot. Just depends on what you are shooting, I suspect. If you need "sports" response, the SONY is probably the better bet ... but if you just need a decent 70-200 ... the images will be nearly the same.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 08-04-2009 at 06:06 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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