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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Wild, Wonderful, Wyoming
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    You asked for it, you got it. You basically said it couldn't be done, imagine what could be done with a tripod or a flash like we all have for years?

    It's all a matter of technique, I learned proper technique as a young pup with a film camera with no grip that was roughly half the size of most DSLRs now a days. No crutch needed, appreciated yes, but this certainly can be done. It just requires some pre planning and good technique.
    A good photograph is knowing where to stand.
    Ansel Adams

    Rule books are paper, they will not cushion a sudden meeting of stone and metal.
    Ernest K. Gann-Fate is the Hunter.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    9,560
    Okay ... as with anything, Ernest ... practice, practice, practice ... but for those without any film experience, it can be hard. The appeal of the SONY is to effectively reduce the poor imaging you get with non-IS cameras. Until SONY came along and pressed the issue, Nikon and especially Canon had no problem "rippng off" their user base for IS-equipped lensing. Now, the prices are back down to Earth, but there was a time there (2005-2007) where you folks were getting nicked pretty darn good for image $tability.

    Thank God for SONY's pressure, eh? If you want to know how much you can thank them, reach right into your wallet ... count the sheckles you have left ... and there is your an$wer.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
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    1,161
    If I may redirect this thread for a moment, I am always willing to learn, and proper technique is very important. So I ask lots of questions from lots of people. TenD do you have any advice for developing a proper grip, holding steady, keeping the damn horizon level, hand position etc. Thanks
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
    Tokina AF 28-70mm F/3.5-4.5
    Tokina AF AT-X 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6
    http://flickr.com/

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Wild, Wonderful, Wyoming
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    In the case of the above shot, I braced on one knee, held the body and shutter with my right hand and supported the lens and body with my left hand with my left arm against my upper body as much as possible. The eyepiece and body was braced against my eye socket and face.

    Then like Don said, I breathe smoothly and right as I started an exhale I very lightly, smoothly, squeeze the shutter. No pushing, no stabbing, just a smooth slow squeeze until the shutter releases. I get some total duds at a slow shutter speed like this, usually it's from lack of this technique. With the high ISO performance of my bodies I rarely have to shoot at a speed near this slow.

    I practice the shutter press on every photo I take. I watch for camera shake as I am pressing the shutter and find the way to press it without moving the body. Smooth slow light squeeze. I don't have a gun, but I understand, when shooting, pulling the trigger is a similar feeling.

    The old fashioned way to get sharp slow shutter speed shots is to put your camera on a tripod and use a remote release or a timer. All of the slow shutter speed techniques, or image stabilization won't hold a candle to a tripod. If you have the time, set your tripod up, you'll get the shot. The tripod will help you stop and think about what you are doing and how you are going to do it.

    IS is a great addition to all of our arsenals, but like many things it's a compromise designed for a situation. IS will do nothing for us if our subject is moving, our subject will still be blurry at slow shutter speeds. Until 2 years ago I didn't have any IS lenses in my bag. Now I have two, and it's a great thing in the right context.
    Last edited by TenD; 02-08-2009 at 08:03 PM.
    A good photograph is knowing where to stand.
    Ansel Adams

    Rule books are paper, they will not cushion a sudden meeting of stone and metal.
    Ernest K. Gann-Fate is the Hunter.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,161
    Thanks, I do shoot and yes the idea is to squeeze the trigger not pull it. the down side is that the vast majority of my shooting involves rapid target assessment and multiple shot engagement, not the best practice when applied to the shutter LOL I need to slow down and 'focus' myself as i shoot with the camera.
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
    Tokina AF 28-70mm F/3.5-4.5
    Tokina AF AT-X 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6
    http://flickr.com/

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Do the other brand cameras have something in the viewfinder to show if you are holding steady. Once I frame the shot and focus I look at the SSS meter and wait to press the shutter button.

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Wild, Wonderful, Wyoming
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkie1263 View Post
    Do the other brand cameras have something in the viewfinder to show if you are holding steady. Once I frame the shot and focus I look at the SSS meter and wait to press the shutter button.

    Frank
    Nothing like that in a Canon camera, however the effect of an IS lens shows in the viewfinder, you can see the image become stable. From what I have read on the Sony scale, it shows the effectiveness of the SSS, when the image becomes stable the scale lessens. So I am not sure if this is an indication if you are stable, but rather an indication if the shot, through SSS is stable.
    A good photograph is knowing where to stand.
    Ansel Adams

    Rule books are paper, they will not cushion a sudden meeting of stone and metal.
    Ernest K. Gann-Fate is the Hunter.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
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    2,152
    Quote Originally Posted by TenD View Post
    ....... So I am not sure if this is an indication if you are stable, but rather an indication if the shot, through SSS is stable.
    I'd say the answer is "both".
    The manual doesn't give a detailed explanation but
    I believe the scale (1-5) gives an indication of how hard the IS is likely to work in order stabilise the image.
    I say "likely" because, so far as I know, the SSS doesn't activate until the mirror flips up. Nether can it predict movement induced by the shutter press.
    The scale fluctuates as you look at it so that's an indication of how still (or not) the camera is being held and if the scale reads "5" it indicates that the IS is likely to be insufficient to stablise the shot.
    In any case, conventional good practice amply described by TenD should always be employed with SSS lending a helping hand along the way.

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