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Thread: F200exr

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    F200exr

    Anyone excited about this?

    I just have one question in mind. It says, full-manual, but I don't see any Shutter priority in the details. Can anyone clarify if Shutter is in fact included in this new killer toy by Fujifilm?

  2. #2
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    Jul 2005
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    Don't trust Fuji M mode. On mine it simply is P mode on some other cameras. I am as baffled if S priority mode is included and after checking Fuji website I'm no clearer to the truth either.
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  3. #3
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    This Japanese site has sample F200 photos:

    http://translate.google.com/translat...ml&sl=ja&tl=en

    A lot of barrel distortion on the wide angle shot of bricks. Otherwise they look good to me.

  4. #4
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    Dec 2007
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    Melbourne Australia
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    814

    FULL manual but NO shutter priority???

    I'm confused too LOL.

    I was interested to read about the new EXR sensor array HERE. Seems to make a lot of sense to me (theoretically), but like all these "great" new ideas, I guess time will tell?

    Cheers

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Look at the mode dial. If there's no A/S setting, it doesn't have Aperture or Shutter Priority. "M" has always been Program mode. Fuji are sleazy in that regard. I also don't see why the the "low noise priority EXR" has to be a SHOOTING MODE. It should be a processing function independent of the exposure mode chosen. In other words, I should get that EXR quality in Av, Tv, M, or any other idiot mode on the camera. I shouldn't have to switch to EXR and give up some control to get it. It also shouldn't cut my resolution in half.

    I'll wait for the F300EXR. Hopefully they'll smarten up by then.
    Last edited by cdifoto; 02-06-2009 at 04:54 AM.
    Ouch.

  6. #6
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    Jun 2007
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    Munich, Germany
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    Another look at the mode dial (and at the already-published user's manual) show that, this time, Mode P is really named Mode P, and Mode M is a real Mode M. In addition, there is a mode A (mode P can be switched between P and A using a menu entry).

    There is no mode S, but also no need for such a mode. The aperture has only two settings. Fixing the shutter speed and letting the camera choose one of only two aperture settings doesn't make much sense. Just use mode M, choose one of the only two apertures (usually open aperture, I reckon), choose your shutter speed, and there's all the mode S you'll ever need with this camera.

    By the way, some reviews on other sites suggest that the EXR really can deliver. Dynamic range seems to be bigger than with any other compact camera (including those with a SuperCCD SR), and HighISO performance looks a bit better than with F30 and F31fd.

    @Jeff: if you ever do a F200EXR review, please have a look at how it behaves in 'normal' modes (Auto, P, M) with picture size set to 6MP. It has already been verified that then setting DR to more than 100% will automatically switch the camera to EXR DR mode. Some people have also suggested that choosing DR=100% and a high ISO setting, e.g. 3200, will automatically switch the camera to EXR SN mode. Since the special EXR SN mode which can be chosen manually is limited to ISO1600, this would be an important issue. Please include 6MP ISO3200 pictures in your review, if you are doing one - no-one else has done that so far.

    Best Regards,
    malamut

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    62
    Quote Originally Posted by malamut View Post
    There is no mode S, but also no need for such a mode. The aperture has only two settings. Fixing the shutter speed and letting the camera choose one of only two aperture settings doesn't make much sense. Just use mode M, choose one of the only two apertures (usually open aperture, I reckon), choose your shutter speed, and there's all the mode S you'll ever need with this camera.

    Best Regards,
    malamut
    How can you say there is "no need" for a S mode?

    How can you deterministically and reliably freeze motion, whether at a kids' birthday, the zoo, or sporting event (we're not talking dslr + pro glass, just someone with a p&s at one of these venues)?

    How about flowers and foliage which inevitably bow to the wind?

    How about bugs in flight, birds in flight, kites, a toddler giving his mama a kiss?

    None of these is within reach of the F200's capability unless either the fixed iris or the ND filter + fixed iris provide the aperture needed at a given ISO (and focal length).

    It would be more accurate to say it wouldn't be "useful" - i.e., it would be terribly frustrating and of limited capability - to have only two shutter speed choices given a fixed ISO since the aperture can only be A or B at a given focal length.

    And yet... they include aperture priority. MG

    It's a poor implementation imho. If they kept the price "down" by not providing a traditional p&s aperture, they blew it...again...mho.

  8. #8
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    the shot to shot and AF times are a greater inhibitor to those action sequences you were talking about. looks pretty solid to me.
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    62
    Quote Originally Posted by Rooz View Post
    the shot to shot and AF times are a greater inhibitor to those action sequences you were talking about.
    The original question is regarding S mode on a p&s.

    The ability to acquire focus and shoot in a burst is of dubious use if the moving subject - whether it's a flight, a flinch or a flitter - is blurry.

    Subject blur ruins every shot for which it's not intended, and it's virtually always intended.

    S mode is the solution to the problem, but shot-to-shot times and AF target acquisition are important. All the systems need to work well together, but they are not the greatest inhibitor given AF lock, and they are not expected on a p&s.

    Many of the shot types I mention are typical p&s subject matter, both regularly and occasionally and S mode (plus AF lock) will facilitate sharp captures.

    Nothing kills a photo like blurriness (or blown highlights), so I'll take one sharp image over any number of blurry ones where focus was nevertheless achieved and shot-to-shot times yielded many pics.

    With S mode, I can anticipate a shot, lock focus and get the one shot, sharp, w/o fast shot-to-shot or AF times. I can also mitigate camera shake such as taking a shot from a boat or idling vehicle, in addition to utilizing OIS (as in "belts and suspenders"). Shutter lag is a big deal and contributes to shot-to-shot times, but it can be dealt with given AF and AE lock.

    For birds in flight and more challenging shots, shot-to-shot and AF times can be critical, so serious birders will choose another solution, but the occasional "birder" is best served by S mode on their p&s. Bugs don't solely alight on a flower and leave, they flit from flower to flower, sometimes hovering and returning to the same one. So AF time isn't critical, it can be locked.

    There are so many other moving subjects on a daily basis, at venues, events, celebrations and around the house that w/o a solid S mode one is relegated to the usual p&s hit-and-miss motion blur.

    Certain grab shots just won't come out. I can be on one swing while my son is on another and still take a sharp pic though both of us are moving.

    I don't know any p&s users who don't want sharp subjects, but not all of them want to lug a bridge or dslr cam w/ outstanding shot-to-shot and AF times.

    It would be interesting to know how many p&s cams there are with those two features that don't have S mode.

    Of the three features - S mode, *fast* AF times and *fast* shot-to-shot times - you'd be more likely to find a p&s with S mode, which is why this p&s a fair target for scrutiny re S mode.

  10. #10
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    Jul 2005
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    Shutter Priority mode isn't the only answer to avoiding blur.

    There are other ways. Like an ISO high and an aperture wide to guarantee that the shutter speed you want is the minimum. Or all Manual if your camera supports it.

    Serious birders and action photographers aren't going to be using a pocketable P&S, or even a superzoom bridge camera for that matter. They're going to be using a digital SLR and the big daddy optics.

    I'd even venture to say that most folks carrying a pocket size P&S at social functions aren't even moving away from Auto. They probably don't even know what those other symbols mean.
    Last edited by cdifoto; 03-21-2009 at 09:09 AM.
    Ouch.

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