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  1. #81
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    176
    ty all, i was very excited to get the image i thought it was dead on as well. the iphoto i have has sharpening i guess i was being to extreme with it ill give it a whirl in a little bit and post. and peekayoh you can always have a go with my images, i like to see what people do with them, especially when Don throws in the twighlight zone or something goofy like that. my images are not sacred, as you can see i am eager to learn all aspects of this and the only way i can do that is to post, see what you guys say or do to the images , understand te corrections and try to do them myself. this is why i was so excited when i posted the first image i got good advice on what to do and i went bach and corrected the shot. i learned more and more about this camera this last trip i am grateful. as you can see when you tell me something i do my darndest to try and correct the mistakes. like i posted before im actually starting to nderstand this stuff.
    Sony A350
    Sony 18-250mm Lens
    Sony 50mm f1.4
    F42AM flash

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,559

    Lightbulb Bracketing for proper Exposure

    'Millz', like 'Rooz' said, this is mostly "after effects" to doll it up, but your main exposure was effectively "right on." Anyone can post-process any which way they want to, as you have correctly pointed out, but not everyone can get the main subject correctly in the exposure. YOU DID! Nice job.

    The one thing you may want to consider is doing the standard bracketing of shots ... exposing higher and lower by +/-0.7EV for all your "tricky" future images. That allows you to have another pair of shots to work with, should different areas of the image be troublesome in the overall exposure.

    I and many others have found bracketing to be a terrific way to positively control your shot selections and the DSLRs are geared up to do it. They make it a confirmed practice in school and often ask to see all your shots, using this method.

    Argument-wise: When people shoot a standard 36-shot roll of film, that means you can get 12 "bracketed" (One at -1EV, one at EV, and the last at +1EV) exposures out of each roll. That can be pretty limiting. You also usually have to keep a manual log of your settings, to kind of follow it. "EXIF data" now basically takes care of that "settings log" for you. Bracketing was the film-shooters "second chance" at getting the exposure correct, because he/she didn't actually know what they had "in the can." It was pretty much a secret until it was developed.

    Happily, with your DSLR and a standard 4GB CF card ... you can get at least hundred "bracketed" shots, so there is really no reason NOT to make bracketing a "good practice", unless you simply cannot get the shot due to movement of the subject. In this particular case, the subject did not move ... so bracket and then post-process the shot at home to get exactly what you want out of it.

    As nice as the LCD is to have, now, on your camera, it is till a questionable tool for evaluation of exposure. More often than not, it is hard to tell how well an exposure is going to look, when you are in the field. The sun and other light sources (or lack there of) can play hell with eyeballing your camera's LCD ... and what may have looked "okay" actually looks like crap when you get back home for editing and review. A wise photographer would use his LCD for framing and establishing the rough exposure, not betting the ranch on a single shot. You are not taking candids, in the truest sense, you are creating photographic art. How about we get all the assets on your side, instead of gambling when you do not have to.

    Admittedly, you will wind up with three times the images, but you will also have a dandy chance of getting it to look "spot on" when you are finished. Let's face it, once you are back home ... there isn't much chance of getting that particular shot, again (Unless you are a repeat visitor ). It's quite liberating to be able to sort through a number of expsoures and find the perfect one, than it is trying to butcher, craft and resurrect ONE messed-up exposure into something "usable."

    Anyway ... that's this photographer's take on it. Ignore as you feel necessary, but by all means, if you do not understand any of this reasoning, just ASK!

    BTW: One other thing bracketing does not change the Aperture or ISO settings to adjust the exposure, ONLY the SHUTTER-SPEED. "AUTO" changes all three settings when using the "EV +/-" setting offset, and that can lead to problems with "bokeh", Depth of Field, and noise. So, in effect, each manual AUTO EV change could be different for three reasons, not just one ... and that's usually not a positive aspect to controlled changes.

    In other words, DO NOT BRACKET by adjusting the EV +/- setting, because, technically, you are not bracketing. Only use the "DRIVE" menu setting (continuous or single shot bracketing).

    Also, do not forget your camera is set for "bracketing" and is expecting three shots each time you photograph a subject, otherwise you could wind up with a strange series of single images, that followed the bracketing rules of exposure (-1EV ,EV, +1EV), but didn't have the other two accompanying exposures. They modified the next two single shots.

    In other words: Every subject image in SETS OF THREE (3).
    Last edited by DonSchap; 02-10-2009 at 10:29 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Very detailed explanation Don. I think you made alot of good points. If you shoot in raw do
    you still have the same adjustment over the exposure?

    Thanks
    Frank

    PS Always a lesson to be learned here.
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Frank, I'm still experimenting with shooting RAW and with the adjustments in Lightroom.
    My take so far, for what it's worth, is that there is a very good chance of "rescueing" a poorly exposed image shot in RAW compared to a JPEG. I've deliberately tried it to see.
    Having said that there's no substitute for getting it right in the first place and "bracketting" is a tried and tested method. However, if you're running short on memory, RAW images will probably save the day.

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,559
    If you are running short of memory (which is one the few things you can control entirely) you really need to carry a spare card or two, especially on a trip or vacation. I have a 32 GB card in my camera to reduce the need for multiple cards (although I have several sizes of additional cards), but it is certainly cheap enough to carry several 4 GB or 8 GB modules.

    Please do not use the "running short" excuse to do something unwise.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    176
    So your saying set it to multiple shots like the 3 button i have. snap the button it takes three shot and each one changes a setting or do i have to do something????
    Sony A350
    Sony 18-250mm Lens
    Sony 50mm f1.4
    F42AM flash

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    I think you need to take three images in a row. That is how it works on the A100.

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,559

    Cool put on those reading glasses ...

    Open your A300/A350 User Manual to pages 98-100 and follow the steps on how to set up bracketing to work for you.

    Let me know if you do not have a manual or are having issues understanding how to use this function.

    Just in case you do not have them handy, read on brave adventurer.

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    Last edited by DonSchap; 02-10-2009 at 04:52 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    176
    hey Don, Is there anything about photography you dont no. I mean come on I ask how to do bracket, you not only tell me but you post the damn pages to the manual. I mean does it get any better than this. not trying to suck up here but do you realize how lucky people are that you are lurking on these forums ready to answers all questions. No offense to anyone else but jeez.

    I want to thank you all very much for helping me with my vacation photos it means alot to me to have these memories and to have them in as good of quality as i do. without each one on here it couldnt have been done, I never would have learned these techniques this quick.

    Thank you Thank you Thank you
    Sony A350
    Sony 18-250mm Lens
    Sony 50mm f1.4
    F42AM flash

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,559
    Actually, there are some people on the forums that do not appreciate instant answers or do not like that someone is actively sharing "the secrets." Once the cats out of the bag, they often chime in, to "help out." It is such a change, I am suspicious when it occurs.

    It's kind of like during the Dark Ages and Spanish Inquisition ... if you don't accept what the manufacturers or experts say .. you are some kind of heretic and need to be tortured and stoned from existence. It is an annoying "fan-boy" mentality that has to be constantly challenged and rooted out for the agonizing stupidity it represents.

    Anyway ... some people also do not appreciate the abrupt answers I generate and get easily offended when their answers are challenged, even with specific fact to back up my responses. It's goofy, I know, but all too common. I have learned, over time, to just blast through this nonsense and provide the facts straight from the gun, when I can. That is precisely why there are copies of the "real" instructions for you and others to read and learn from. No guessing, just plain old everyday, in your face, fact. Yes, the manufacturer explains their operation. All I have been trying to do is focus that information, so it is not so overwhelming and make it a little easier to understand.

    Is it working? I believe it is ... considering the work that several photographers have been able to create ... without "formal" training. I call mine, ad hoc training ... on a need to know basis. I hope it helps ... and it seems to be.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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