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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,161
    The Tamron 70-200 is seeing a huge amount of use and work, I would say 90% of the time it is on the 700, then the 17-50 followed by the 80-400, I really like the 80-400 and hope to use it more once the weather gets nice, it really is a bright light great outdoors lens!
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
    Tokina AF 28-70mm F/3.5-4.5
    Tokina AF AT-X 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6
    http://flickr.com/

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    @Don, yeah i realize the MFD on that lens it not so good for indoor use, but i really wanted a piece of the legend so i had to buy it :-)
    just like the beercan which i rarely use :-)
    but i'm sure i'll find new uses for them in spring!
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Well the only way I can fit everything in my bag is with the 70-300 on it. But I do use that for all me bird shots. I use the 50mm inside all the time. And use the lens I borrowed for all me landscape shots. So I guess all my lenses get used about the same.

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    Peter,

    I believe that the new AF 24-105mm f/4 G SSM is their compromise. It's MFD is a lot closer.
    Yes, but still a rumour though. It's going to have to be really something to persuade me away from my trusty old 28-135 (MFD or no MFD).

    Don't take my word for it, have a look here. I'll be interested to hear what you all think.

    http://artaphot.ch/index.php?option=...=134&Itemid=43

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    but does the MFD not decrease when in Macro mode? or is there a disadvantage shooting portraits in macro on the 28-135mm?
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,424
    35/2 mostly.
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Quote Originally Posted by Elisha82 View Post
    but does the MFD not decrease when in Macro mode? or is there a disadvantage shooting portraits in macro on the 28-135mm?
    Macro only works at the Wide end. Never found it that useful, definitely not for portraits. Step back and zoom to 60/70mm (aps-c).

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    It has an impressive performance in the light of day, there is no doubt ... as you examine these shots. Even Minolta felt it was a true winner ... but then again, most MFDs were around 5 feet back then. Anything close, zoom-wise, was remarkable. That is way primes were so popular. They offered great MFD and low light performance, for slower film speed.

    Peter, it looks to be a great lens for outdoor use.

    Personally, I like not having to back up over a couch to take a flash image. As always, it depends on what you are shooting. If you only grab the camera for outdoor stuff, your selection of lenses opens up enormously.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    85

    70-300

    70-300 because most of the time, I'm shooting sports, and I need the reach.

    A Tamron 28-300 f/3.5-6.3 is on my list once the budget will allow, and I'd expect it's versatility will make it the new go to lens. I expect it to be similar to the 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 Don uses for the same reason he uses it so much, except I know how much the 70-300 is at full reach, so I know I need to retain that. I don't use the short end that much, and when I do, my 28-80 usually comes out.

    Eventually, I'll catch a deal on a fast Minolta prime, or either the Tamron 17-50/2.8 or 28-75/2.8, but that range is not, at this time, what pays the bills.
    Last edited by Panda Bear; 01-26-2009 at 09:10 PM.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    Panda ... I think you may be a little disappointed with the 28-300mm.

    In my evaluations, between the 18-200, 28-300, 18-250 lenses, the 18-250 delivers the best all-around shots in this class, bar NONE! It simply shoots circles around the others.

    If a utility lens is what you want ... that is the one, otherwise your Image Quality will be rather "iffy" and, usually, in need of improvement. If you have the time ... take a CF card to the local lens store and shoot a side-by-side series, yourself, with each one. I guarantee that you will be a "believer" once you do.

    Please take a few minutes to review this test series (<-Click on this) ... to see why I say this.

    Good luck
    Last edited by DonSchap; 01-26-2009 at 09:11 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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