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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    1,760

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,557
    Actually, "Eye-One" & "i1" ares both correct. Personally, it would be a lot easier, I suspect, if they would just choose one over the other, but what the heck? I suspect GretagMacBeth does this for international identification. "Eye-One" is pronounced that way, in English, but in German ... nope. Anyway, the "Eye-One" is a modular system set up with not only a spectrometer for the LCD/Monitor calibration, but also a tablet from analyzing the "standard" color print-out for correction, also.

    You can select a quick, automated routine ... or go with a rather lengthy, in-depth calibration ... which takes into consideration a lot more manual monitor adjustment ... where it interactively asks you to adjust the monitor rather than just taking what the monitor already has. So instead of just changing the "profile" to adjust the computer's response, it has you adjust the monitor ... scans it again, and then puts and more refined profile into the computer ... offering ever deeper color control.

    Once you go through this, you begin to understand how much each separate piece affects the next in the chain to the printer. The closer you can get them, the less adjustment you will have to make in the future.

    Some papers (specialized neat stuff) have a very tight window for optimum print, which offers better color response to your gamut. Let's say you want that brighter green ... but the calibration just cannot quite give it to you, because the monitor adjustment is too course, from the automated calibration. So, you go through the "refined" manual calibration, working with the program to "tighten up" the monitor's settings. Then, your printer's response suddenly fits in the window where you can finally get that color that was eluding you.

    Where this all really gets tight is with corporate logo colors and such, where a specific company has their logo in an exact shade of "green", let's say. I mean exact. No more yellow or blue ... it has to be spot on. Why? Because it is THEIR color. They paid for the right to own it. Every official logo has to be THAT color ... not a shade or variant of it. So ... as you can imagine, their computer monitors have be ready to display THAT color, exactly, in order for them to know how a brochure or other image will layout against it.

    Anyway ... that is the kind of the 'control' that manual adjustment has over just doing an automated run through. Basically, once you have the LCD pretty close under the manual method, you can pretty much kick back to the automated measurement for the routine "weekly" calibration and do the manual at the end of the month, just to keep it fit and trim.

    Remember, if you move the monitor to another computer ... yep, do it all over again, because that computer's video card may (and probably will) respond differently to it.

    Good luck and keep it tight.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 01-23-2009 at 06:43 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Brisbane, CA
    Posts
    3,591
    Thanks Don
    Lukas

    Camera: Anonymous
    I could tell you but I wouldn't want you to get all pissy if it's the wrong brand

    Flickr

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,557
    Has anyone gotten their Color Management tool, yet? Is it ... too much to ask?

    (shrug)
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    I've done online tests for gamma, brightness, a bit of color (not sure how accurate it can be), but I'm happy with it for now .... not yet worried enough to checks it out with a reader. A local place around here does rent out a gadget to calibrate monitors though.
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,557
    Well, the sooner people get their monitors "ALIGNED & CALIBRATED", the easier these discussions are going to be concerning White Balance. I am already beginning to see fruit bearing from my warning ... so get a "huey" or quit asking. It's worth it.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    i will need a whole new monitor for this.
    my current CRT is pretty dark at it's brightest setting. probably due to age.
    but my Macbook is calibrated for Adobe RGB.
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,557
    Monitors have never been cheaper. Cripes, I shudder to think the cost of all the monitors I have gone through over the past ten years. Anyway ... I hate spending other people's money. Hell, I hate spending my own! But, there are some levels we all need to achieve to properly exchange images. Call it the "cost of education & commerce."

    I didn't make the rules ... just dealing with it. You might try editing on someone else's newer system, too. The idea is reach a level of comparable image ... that way we all see the identical (or even close) level of color, tint, and brightness.

    Anyway, I'm sure you realize what the desired outcome is. If you are going to publish your images ... you need to make sure they are correct, otherwise what other people are seeing is not what you are and your "corrections" become erroneous.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    8
    I recently picked up one of the LaCie 730 LDC monitors which came with a colormeter and calibration software and printer profiler. I think its one of the best investments I have made in a long_long time. Photos out of the Sony 700&900 (and one other camera) are an absolute "spot on match with prints." Conversions from RGB to CMYK for pro lab prints from CS4 has never been so accurate for me. Today I truly understand. Color management is so important and so few understand this.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    any recommendation on what brand and model of LCD monitors in the 22" size?
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

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