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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Des Plaines, IL
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    9,557
    Look, friend ... I can hold my finger down on the shutter release just as well as anyone else can. Hey, I've got pictures, too!

    I don't remember this being a contest to see who can wear out their camera, first ... but then again, maybe it should be! I need a good reason to trade mine in, because unlike you ... I cannot find one!

    Stick that in your lens case and pack it. LOL

    BTW: I don't shoot just dragon claws ... I have dozens of ugly toenail shots, too!
    Last edited by DonSchap; 01-12-2009 at 10:20 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
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    10,424
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    I don't remember this being a contest to see who can wear out their camera, first.
    neither did i, thats why it wasnt ME that mentioned it Mr Schap.
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    9,557
    You know ... I may just come down that way and see what all you are shooting. I have a lot of icicles and wet stuff to keep Hoover Dam going for a while, this week. Not a whole lot of fun ... and I tend to get a lil' Grumpy.

    Let me see how the schedule looks ... and I'll keep ya informed of the "Trip to the Land Down-under" Then, Roo-man ... you can show me how to shoot!
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,161
    So I think we all head down to Rooz's place and work this whole thing out, 2 - 3 weeks should just about do it, You got floor space for about 6 of us? I can't do half, maybe even 80 % of the stuff you guys are doing here, but I keep putting up sports shots, they don't lend themselves to artistic PP anyway!
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
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  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
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    as long as one of you can do landscapes then its fine by me ! i need some serious help.
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    I'd love to come visit mate! lol.... make it space for 7 (unless that was including the Sony regs )
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,557

    Lightbulb Escape to the land ...

    Speaking of landscapes ...

    Here are a few quick tips that are not essential to every landscape picture you take, but bearing them in mind and applying them judiciously will improve your picture-taking:

    • A foreground object will help to frame the scene and add a look of three-dimensionality.
    • Frame the scene so that it contains a center of interest - an object that draws the viewer's eye into the picture.
    • Placing the center of interest off-center, in accordance with the Rule of Thirds, will create a harmonious composition.
    • Placing the horizon a third-of-the-way-down from the top or bottom of the frame is usually much better than having it in the middle of the scene.
    • Scale can often be important to the understanding of a landscape, and can be achieved by including an object of a known size in the scene. People, animals or other recognizable objects that would naturally belong in the scene are suitable for showing scale.
    • The quality of lighting is perhaps the most influential attribute of a successful landscape. Waiting for interesting lighting that is moody, dramatic or diffused usually pays off in a memorable photograph.
    • Ensure that your camera's flash is turned off when shooting landscapes, unless you require it to brighten a foreground object. Flash in a dusty, misty or foggy scene may cause flare by reflecting off the droplets of moisture or dust particles.
    • Use a tripod to ensure sharpness, especially in low-light conditions.
    • In very low light, be sure to select a high digital camera's ISO setting that will permit proper exposure and good depth of field.
    • Watch for unsightly or unnatural elements such as overhead wires, hydrants, poles and garbage cans, especially in the foreground. If you cannot easily move them, reposition yourself to a camera angle that eliminates them from the frame. Or … reposition yourself several times and recombine in a panorama format, cropping out the offending items, before recombining the images.
    • Don't let the weather stop you from capturing an attractive landscape. Rain can add a degree of softness and peacefulness to a scene. On an overcast day, be sure your scene has an area of color in it to counteract the overall dull lighting.
    • Keep the rules of composition in mind when framing a scene. Lines, in particular, can be a strong factor in making an interesting landscape.
    • Landscape photography is often more horizontal than it is vertical, presenting the opportunity to shoot a panorama. Remember to use “Exposure Lock.” If you are faced with a wide vista … this is your moment.
    • When the wind is blowing or water is moving - waves, waterfalls, a tumbling brook - capturing that movement by using a slow shutter speed to create blur can add great interest to a landscape. When selecting a slow shutter speed, be sure you retain proper exposure by also appropriately adjusting your lens' aperture. Do this in Shutter Priority (S-mode).

    Most of all ... keep in mind, you are looking for a "natural" look to it ... minimizing the effects of man. Man is not the subject ... but, a "lack of man's touch" kind of is. Nature, at its best.

    Meanwhile, hijack is over ... back to "motorcycle photography ... at night!"
    Last edited by DonSchap; 01-12-2009 at 09:13 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    130
    Yeah this got out of hand real quickly.
    Nikon D40x
    - Nikkor ED 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 II

    Give me feedback on Flickr

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,424
    thanks Don, its not the technical side thats the problem. the issue is the "eye" for the shot. some people have it, some don't. unfortuantely, i'm part of the latter. lol
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Cerritos, CA
    Posts
    66

    Howdy Matt.

    Reading over the thread, I agree, it did get a bit outta hand here. No prob though, let's try to get back on track.

    As stated previously in the thread, the pics just need a little PP care. Yes, the lighting is flat, but I think you did a great job with what you had to work with. Fundamentals are sound (rule of thirds in #1, #3, somewhat in #2 and ground view perspective in #4), and I can see that you thought of composition in each photo.

    Here are my critiques:

    #1: This one is cool, with the lens flare and all, with the exception of the largest faint orb just above the handlebars. I'm not a stickler about perfectly aligned horizons like a lot of people are, but I can't help but notice that everything is leaning to the left; it doesn't help that there are so many vertical poles in the shot.

    #2: This is my favorite and has the most potential in this set of 4. (Mind you, I check your Flickr and there are a LOT of good shots in this set that you didn't post here.) I'm not going to shy away from editing your picture. I think that with the flat tones and the color of the bike, it'd work awesome as a black and white. And as such, a boost in contrast is definitely in order. Also, I'd crop it a bit differently to make the bike more "in your face", and also because the concrete pillar base at bottom left is unneeded.



    Now that, in my humble opinion, now looks like a badass bike.

    #3: I think you have much better shots from this shoot than this one. Besides the slight flare you're getting from the parking lot light, the bike just isn't in focus at all.

    #4: This one I can see you were definitely placing emphasis on composition, which is good. To me, it's just that the background is too busy or simply just too in focus. I can practically count the seats in the bleachers whereas there's some softness in the bike's structure. Just a thought.

    Also, and this is totally not your fault: from a guy who participated in many a car-show back in high school, your buddy really needs to buff & shine his gixxer. Geezus.

    Great stuff Matt, and I think your night shots will catch up to your fabulous daylight shots asap.
    Last edited by unclebrudy; 01-13-2009 at 12:01 AM.
    grip: KM Maxxum 5D | Minolta 50mm f1.4 neck: Sony A200 | Minolta 70-210mm f4
    backup: Fuji s6000fd | pocket: Fuji F20SE
    sentimental: Sony DSC-S85
    wife: Canon s800IS | 9yo daughter: Canon s410

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