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Thread: Dropped camera

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    369

    Dropped camera

    My camera was attached to the tripod, resting in a corner against the wall. The tripod began to slide along the wall and eventually fell down and hit the camera on a concrete floor. I didn't actually see the impact and witness what part of the camera hit the ground, but now I notice that the viewfinder looks darker when taking night shots and now I sometimes cannot focus when taking night shots because the camera cannot bring enough light in? What did I do!
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    nikon d40 | nikkor 55-200mm vr | nikkor 18-55mm | nikkor 70-300mm vr | SB 400 | My Flickr Animal Portraits Group! Join if you enjoy animals.

  2. #2
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    Dec 2007
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    Ok I think I answered my own question. It was the lens. There was something loose on the inside and I couldn't use the focus ring completely, so I moved the focus ring around a few times and the lens was apparently jammed, so I guess that explains the unable to focus part. Thanks anyway.
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    nikon d40 | nikkor 55-200mm vr | nikkor 18-55mm | nikkor 70-300mm vr | SB 400 | My Flickr Animal Portraits Group! Join if you enjoy animals.

  3. #3
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    Hopefully it was the kit lens. No more leaning the tripod against the wall with the camera mounted!
    Lukas

    Camera: Anonymous
    I could tell you but I wouldn't want you to get all pissy if it's the wrong brand

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  4. #4
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    Feb 2006
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    This is from a guy who already had a camera crash and burn by just falling out of his hands inexplicably. I literally saw what I would have considered impossible all this to say bad things can happen at any moment with camera gear LBGChris. We need to be vigilant and mindful of that fact. I try to make sure these days no matter what I'm doing with my gear it is kept secured. Hope it's a simple and cheap fix.
    I thought about who I am... and realized I was an
    unformed, unreconciled imagery, without "GOD"


    NikonD?
    and some other Nikon stuff

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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    570
    Dropping cameras sucks :<, dropped my old old canon p&s when i was like 13 or smthing. basicly broke the whole thing, lens flash screen etc(stone floor>canon). 4 weeks later i got the same camera with all new parts from guarantee, no idea why they didnt just send a new cam.

    Hope u get the lens fixed.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/14807929@N05/

    D40+Sigma 17-70-2.8-4.5 DC MACRO

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by LBGChris View Post
    My camera was attached to the tripod, resting in a corner against the wall.

    So, you set it up for a drop test...

    The tripod began to slide along the wall and eventually fell down and hit the camera on a concrete floor.

    On concrete...that's a bold move...

    I didn't actually see the impact and witness what part of the camera hit the ground, but now I notice that the viewfinder looks darker when taking night shots and now I sometimes cannot focus when taking night shots because the camera cannot bring enough light in? What did I do!
    Test worked. Result of test: Cameras don't respond well to being dropped on concrete. Be sure to report these results to Nikon so they can add them to the Support FAQ. That way, the rest of us will be sure to avoid the possibility of dropping our cameras on concrete floors.

    BTW: You can also notify the manufacturer of your tripod. Let them know that the tripod doesn't work real well when the legs are not splayed apart and set on a relatively level surface. They will want to know this important information.

    Nikkor 18-105 VR to replace broken 18-55: $325
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    Eric Lund
    Nikon D200
    Nikkors: 17-55mm f2.8, 18-200mm f3.5-f4.5 VR, 70-300mm f4.5-5.6 VR, 35mm f2, 50mm f1.8, 55mm f2.8 AI-S micro, 105mm f2.8 VR micro
    Other Lenses: Tokina 12-24 f4, Tamron 75-300mm f4-5.6 LD macro
    Stuff: Nikon SB800, Nikon MBD200, Gitzo 1327 Tripod w/RRS BH-55LR Ballhead, Sekonic L-358 meter

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    369
    hahaha thanks eric...

    yeah um... lesson learned my friends. lesson learned.

    i think i escaped the situation relatively unharmed.
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    nikon d40 | nikkor 55-200mm vr | nikkor 18-55mm | nikkor 70-300mm vr | SB 400 | My Flickr Animal Portraits Group! Join if you enjoy animals.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
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    My "basketball/camera bounce" effort was with a Pentax and Zoom lens about 10 years ago. We went to take some photos of our Son receiving a school award and I found out the hard way that the natural enemy of the Zoom lens is the camera strap. Got my leg caught in the strap as I hopped over a chair and pulled the whole camera from my grasp. Camera hit the floor and the lens broke into about 5 pieces. Never did get to take the shot of our Son receiving his award
    Canon 5D MKlll & Canon 50D
    Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L USM | Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM | Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM | Canon 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro | Canon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM | Canon 50mm f/1.8 | Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4.5 | Canon 430EX Flash | Lowepro Mini Trekker AW | Lowepro Toploader 65 AW | Lowepro Slingshot 200AW | Kata 3n1-10

    Panasonic Lumix FZ200
    Panasonic Lumix TZ7 (aka ZS3)
    Panasonic Lumix FT3 (aka TS3)

    Ali Baba.....the Thief of Bad Gags

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
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    I had several near misses with wayward camera straps. The only time I put a strap on my camera is if I know I'll be wearing it around my neck for a full day. I usually just carry the camera in my hand(s).

    One of the easiest ways to see if your camera bounces is to let a camera strap hang off the edge of a surface that you have put the camera on. Murphy's Law is certain to ensure that at some point the camera will not remain on said surface.
    Eric Lund
    Nikon D200
    Nikkors: 17-55mm f2.8, 18-200mm f3.5-f4.5 VR, 70-300mm f4.5-5.6 VR, 35mm f2, 50mm f1.8, 55mm f2.8 AI-S micro, 105mm f2.8 VR micro
    Other Lenses: Tokina 12-24 f4, Tamron 75-300mm f4-5.6 LD macro
    Stuff: Nikon SB800, Nikon MBD200, Gitzo 1327 Tripod w/RRS BH-55LR Ballhead, Sekonic L-358 meter

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    On Ssil2000's advice I paid for insurance on my camera as an extra on my home insurance policy. Wherever the camera is and whatever happens to it it's covered with a small excess and surprisingly small premium.
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

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