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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
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    Minolta 50mm F1.7 RS Wedding shots.....

    This entire album was shot with the 50mm.

    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?ai...d&id=518211742

    i was unable to use any other lens cause my g'damn flash decided to die the night before the wedding.

    i used the available ambient light as well as the light from the video guy. did not use built in flash for any of the shots.

    this is also a pic from the 50mm: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...8&id=518211742


    no PP done on any of the pics other than cropping and light USM.
    all the pics are still on my Macbook and have yet to be transferred to my PC. i will eventually run them trough Lightroom as well.

    i'm pleased with the outcome however.
    Last edited by Elisha; 12-31-2008 at 01:46 PM.
    Canon EOS 7D

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Nice series of images.
    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    A good job fighting through problems and still recovering reasonable results. It's unfortunate that the flash was lost prior to the shoot. It is always wise to have a backup for such important, once in a lifetime occasions, be it the camera body, the flash or even a lens of two. It may not be at the same level as the main equipment, but at least it is something to fall back on.

    Some folks use a P&S type of camera, in their bag ... but that really is a poor replacement for a good DSLR. Personal comparisons have revealed if you want DSLR results ... get a DSLR.

    As far as the flash goes, I do believe you were advised to purchase either the HVL-F56AM, HVL-F42AM or HVL-F36AM for use with your camera. The '36 is the cheapest ($199) ... and probably a bit more reliable than that SIGMA you latched on to. You may want to rethink that decision, in light (no pun intended ... not really) of this experience.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 12-31-2008 at 02:43 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    i believe my Sigma may have been drop kicked by one of the kids the night before. either way it is being repaired under warranty now. the infrared AF, LCD and zoom motor work fine. only lost the flash bulb.
    could have happened to any brand of flash.

    the Sigma did an excellent job although it was not my first choice.
    here's an album which i used it in:
    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?ai...5&id=518211742
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    You are getting good results in your efforts, but your crops are a little too tight at the top. It may be a personal preference, but I would leave a bit more room up there otherwise it makes people look a little "cramped?"
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    that's not enough?
    i'll have to leave more space next time. maybe more on the sides too so the top does not stand out too much.
    Canon EOS 7D

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    That was really cruel luck after all that preparation and top marks for stickin in there.
    Not sure I agree with Don's comment about the framing. Maybe in a few cases but not as a generalisation.
    It does show up the problem of shallow DOF when shooting wide open, maybe you could have tried a little fill flash with the built in unit but I'm not sure how much control you have with your camera.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
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    on the other hand, i didn't have to carry my other lenses around or my camera bag for that matter :-)
    Canon EOS 7D

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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    9,560

    Cool Sitting on the cropper ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Peekayoh View Post
    Not sure I agree with Don's comment about the framing. Maybe in a few cases but not as a generalisation.
    Your are correct, Peek ... cropping is tough. I tend to look at cropping an image on the basis of the image you are trying to convey. In other words, how many pictures can you get from one ... and then settling on the "best" one of that series.

    The fact is, as you reduce the amount of image you use ... you reduce the number of pixels and overall size you can expand the image to. You know that sensor size comes with a price. If you are shooting the 24.6MP A900 ... you have paid top dollar for the amount of image you have. Your cropping is going to be the most effective, leaving you the greatest number of pixels for the remaining image than from any other SONY camera.

    If you shoot with a 12MP sensor camera ... you have less to lop off and still get a decent overall amount.

    10.2MP ... even less. So, consider your crops carefully, when you go to print an 8x10 or larger. You are affecting your image quality.

    Your artistry is key for cropping, but some rules are pretty generic:

    * DO NOT CROP ON A JOINT. This really makes the shot look troubling, because the viewer does no know how long the arm or leg is ... and, well ... that kind of curiosity is distracting to the image. The safest bet is usually below the joint, for proportionality.
    * Allow for some head room ... so the person does not look "cramped." When you shoot, don't crowd in on the person ... but consider a larger scene, then crop in gently, if you have to. Not everything is a convenient 3x4 or 5x7.
    * Crop to allow equidistant space on the left and right of the main subject.
    * Crop out "half-people." No one usually looks good halfway into a shot.
    * Remember the Rule of Thirds, as you crop, to get a better "story-telling" effect. Make the shot "flow", if you can.

    Anyway ... these are some of the guidelines, not really rules to a good crop. Once again, it is YOUR presentation. If it looks bad to you ... it probably does to someone else. A bad crop can ruin the best of images and a good one can take an ordinary shot and make it look poignant and fantastic. Try to keep it simple ... and looking like a complete image ... not just a part of another one.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    thanks for the tips.

    here's a preview from the Pro Photographer that covered the reception the second day in the grooms hometown: http://blog.wowphoto.my/2008/12/19/mark-jessica/
    he had 2x D300s strapped, one on each shoulder.
    there was also another guy with a D300 i think taking pics of just the guests and the other happenings.

    the first day of the wedding and my hometown reception was covered by me, a friend of the groom with a D90 and a guy my dad paid with who used a D80.
    Canon EOS 7D

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