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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    130
    Yeah, I'm already addicted.

    How does the beercan compare to the Tamron?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    That I couldn't tell you. Try this site for reviews.http://www.dyxum.com/dforum/default.asp I think this is the site that has all the lens reviews.
    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Quote Originally Posted by GotToyota? View Post
    I take pictures of pretty much everything, but I'd really like a telephoto lens with macro capability.

    http://www.adorama.com/US%20%20%20%20318388.html

    Is that a beercan? .............
    Not a Beercan.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    788
    I just picked up the beercan, and I also have the new kit telephoto, the Sony 75-300. From a little bit of messing around, I feel like the beercan is a bit sharper and has the "Minolta colors." It's also built like a tank. I haven't done any real testing, so it could all be in my head.

    However its very heavy, and big enough it's not going to fit in many bags. It dictated my bag choice in fact, because it would only fit in one of the few I was looking at.

    I think the Tamron 70-300 and the Sony 75-300 are pretty similar, except the Tamron is a bit sharper, and a hair faster on the short end.

    To be honest, I think some of these older lenses (beercan in particular) have become a bit legendary. The coatings on newer lenses provide better flare control, and they are often smaller and lighter. I love the beercan because I like to shoot a lot of portrait type stuff in that focal range, but the 75-300 is probably as good or better all around.

    If you find a beercan for cheap, pick it up. I got mine because it was in a local shop where I could mount it and check it out, for only $100. But judging on my fairly positive experience with the 75-300, and people say the Tamron is better, I would reccomend a Tamron 70-300 with it's 6 year warranty and better range for your telephoto. You can find the Tamron new with full warranty around $150, and the beercan is typically going to go for close to $200 with no warranty on ebay.

    However, it might be worth picking up the Minolta 35-70 f/4 for cheap (~$30) off ebay to get a pretty good idea for the feel, sharpness, color, and speed of the beercan, to get a good idea.
    Last edited by laydros; 12-28-2008 at 09:17 AM.
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    130
    BTW, I had a question about post processing. I have Photoshop CS2 and Lightroom 2.2, where are some good guides that will help me tweak my post processing abilities? I can already alter the levels and such (I normally do auto levels, then change the brightness slightly).

    And I've seen camera profiles mentioned, how do you change those? I've seen someone say how to do it, but I tried it with my point-and-shoot and it didn't seem to work.

    -Matt

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    My hat is off to you "old glass" new guys. Having shot both types of lenses ... you know here my head is at. I'm just waiting for my wallet to catch up.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    788
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    My hat is off to you "old glass" new guys. Having shot both types of lenses ... you know here my head is at. I'm just waiting for my wallet to catch up.
    Not sure if you are referring to what I said, or the other people here that like older glass.

    For me, with a baby coming, still finishing school, and new to this, the old glass has been a real help. But it's not without its downfalls, like the ghosting I seem to get. I'm yet to really notice any issues with CA in my photos with the older stuff, but I haven't done a lot of looking for it.

    I think the beercan is a keeper, and beyond that I hope to pick up a couple of the primes Sony hasn't carried over into the newer lineup. The 35-70 f/4 has been cool for some inside portrait shots, the focal length is great for that, and its a bit faster in that range than my 18-70. But the range is too small for a walkaround, which is why I'm looking for that now. I just wish the Tamron 17-50 was a little longer or the 28-75 was a little shorter. 24-70 seems ideal.

    Anyone have any thoughts on if Sony is planning to bring back some of the primes that we don't have. It's kinda weird to only to have access to (IIRC) 20, 28, expensive 35, 50, expensive 85 in the normal range. Seems like they could bring back the 50 1.7, the 24 2.8 and maybe cheaper, smaller apertures around 35 and 85?
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    The older PRIMEs are great lenses. I keep a few around, all of the time. Easily "pocketable" and whatnot, but what is tremendously annoying is the grade change in the zoom lenses. SONY does not appear to be caving in to grades in the PRIMEs. They are all top drawer.

    Look, unless you are selling your images for business, you can get by with just about anything on the front of your camera. The only one grading your shots is YOU! Who knew?

    As time moves forward, this level of ... well, let's call it "satisfaction", for argument's sake ... starts to fade away and you begin to desire for a sharper, more error-free photography. That's when it begins to cost you money. As long as your satisfaction is placated with what you have ... nothing should change. No further costs will be involved. When the paradigm shifts ... the eyes open ... and the focus tightens ... and, of course, the wallet thins.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 12-28-2008 at 12:59 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    788
    By grade change are you referring to the image quality overall, or more like the quality change throughout the zooms focal lengths?
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    No ... I am referring to the different grade zooms of the same focal length that are out there. You buy a SONY 75-300mm for $150 ... and then a TAMRON 70-300mm for same amount and then one more (G SSM) for $700. There is no explanation for the price shift and, of course, with one of them you wind up with questionable glass and having to determine why.

    With the 50mm f/.7 ... there is a matching 50mm f/1.4. Are they all that different? Why did SONY stop producing the most popular lens ever made for Minolta? They only make the 50mm f/1.4 ... and priced a little high.

    Why did they stop making the 35mm f/2? An affordable and more usable NORMAL lens for the APS-C camera. They only make the 35mm f/1.4 G ... serious money.

    The problem is most people will buy the cheaper lens, thinking they can get by ... and then complain with the results. Other glass ... was good and you cannot get it any more. So ... that's kind of frustrating to explain to most people who have never had the experience.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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