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View Poll Results: Pick the lense please

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  • Sony 50mm f/1.4 Lens

    2 50.00%
  • Minolta AF50mm f/1.4

    2 50.00%
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Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    I'm with e_dawg on this one. You should be able to pick up a 50mm f1.7 and a 50mm macro for the same (maybe less) price as the Sony f1.4.
    I just bought a second 50mm Macro, RS version to see if it was an improvement on the one I have but I think I prefer the older one. The focus limiter is an advantage but I don't really have a problem with focus speed on the older lens anyway. The colour rendition on the RS seems a bit warmer.
    I'll stick the RS on eBay next year.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    176
    so i guess im confused whats the big difference between these lenses. the macro f2.8 and the f1.4. the other question am i thinking right with fixed 50mm or should i be looking in a different direction. such as 35mm or some other lense. im looking for indoor portrait low light maybe. something that will take stunning photos.
    Sony A350
    Sony 18-250mm Lens
    Sony 50mm f1.4
    F42AM flash

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    788
    I haven't used any of these lenses, but if you think the 50mm is too long, and price isn't an issue, then the 35mm f/1.4 G is one of the highest rated lenses on Dyxum.

    Early on I was thinking about getting one of the 50mm for indoor shots of my on-the-way daughter, but it was pointed out to me that 50mm can be a little long indoors.
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Well the f1.4 simply has a large aperture which can gather more light so you can use it in low light conditions. Unfortunately sharpness suffers at f1.4 (see the review that rooz pointed you to) and you need to stop down to get sharper, so bang goes the advantage of the wider aperture.
    The 50mm macro on the other hand is still sharp at it's smaller f2.8 maximum aperture. It also has a "true" macro 1:1 performance for the little things in life.

    You need to decide what's important to you.

    On the subject of a portrait lens, conventional wisdom says 105mm is the best focal length, but anything from 75 to 135mm is OK. If you want a tight head shot, you have to do it from too close with a 50mm lens; when you're only a 18" or so away, noses grow and ears disappear. Even worse with a 35mm. Of course with the APS-C sensor, your 50mm lens becomes 75mm and is actually a pretty good choice for this application. The low price of a second hand 50mm f1.7 lens makes it a "must have" for the APS-C user.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    670
    If it's portraits you're interested in, the 50 mm lenses would be preferable for indoor portraits on APS-C (i.e., non-full frame dSLRs like the A100-700 Sonys).

    35 mm would be a better choice if you wanted a single prime lens that would be your all-purpose walkaround lens, as it is equivalent to a "normal" lens that has a similar field of view to human vision (i.e., neither magnified nor wide-angle). However, the 35/1.4G IMO is not that type of lens for several reasons: (1) too expensive for what you get, (2) specialized for portraiture at the expense of sharpness for other applications, (3) flare outdoors in bright sun, (4) longitudinal chromatic aberration at out-of-focus transitions.
    Last edited by e_dawg; 12-21-2008 at 09:17 AM.

    Nikon: D300, D700, Nikkor: 24-70, 70-200, 70-300/VR, 24/2.8, 35/2, 50/1.4G, 60/2.8G, 180/2.8,
    Sigma: 10-20, 50-150/2.8, 50/2.8, Tamron: 17-50/2.8, 28-75/2.8, Tokina: 12-24, Zeiss: 25/2.8
    Olympus: E-520, E-3, 7-14, 9-18, 11-22, 12-60, 14-35/2, 14-54, 35-100/2, 50-200, 25/2.8, 35/3.5, 50/2
    Panasonic: G1, Leica: 14-50, 14-150, 25/1.4
    Sony: A700, A900, 24-85, 35-70, 70-210/4, 20/2.8, 24/2.8, 50/2.8, T 90 macro, Zeiss: 24-70/2.8, 135/1.8
    P&S: Canon S90, Panasonic: LX3


  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    Quote Originally Posted by e_dawg View Post
    If it's portraits you're interested in, the 50 mm lenses would be preferable for indoor portraits on APS-C (i.e., non-full frame dSLRs like the A100-700 Sonys).

    35 mm would be a better choice if you wanted a single prime lens that would be your all-purpose walkaround lens, as it is equivalent to a "normal" lens that has a similar field of view to human vision (i.e., neither magnified nor wide-angle). However, the 35/1.4G IMO is not that type of lens for several reasons: (1) too expensive for what you get, (2) specialized for portraiture at the expense of sharpness for other applications, (3) flare outdoors in bright sun, (4) longitudinal chromatic aberration at out-of-focus transitions.
    Agreed, 50mm is the ideal choice for an indoor portrait and has some uses outdoors as well (depending on the background). I think you will find 50mm on a C sized sensor to be perfect.
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

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