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  1. #2471
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Cool Please understand ... fill flash

    I was only trying to use the "flash" idea as a convenient point of contention concerning exposure levels.

    ALL the APS-C cameras come with the pop-up flash, so the convenience part of this idea is always there. You simply check your flash mode, in the menu for "Fill Flash" and then also check menu, under flash control for "ADI flash"

    Lift the flash and then pop the shot. If the flash is "over-blown", use the Flash Exposure setting to ratchet it down to the right amount, but you should be able to tell with one or two shots at various settings. Then ...pick the one that pops and has not gone overboard with highlights! I would imagine that you are still trying to maintain a "natural" looking exposure.

    You need to bear in mind, you are looking for definition and separation between the background and the subject. Fill flash does that. It also allows you to do a lot less "playing around" in post-process. Let the initial capture do most of the work.

    It is rare that I go into a photograph thinking, "Well, I'll correct that exposure in PP." Usually, if I am thinking post process correction, it is for things that need to be removed, if I cannot find a way to hide them. When you look through the viewfinder, see ALL of the image, not just the subject. You'd be very surprised the things that get into a shot ... when you are NOT looking.

    Please ... continue. The submissions are great and appreciated. I hope this has been helpful.

    BTW: Forget the flash when it comes to the wasp ...
    Last edited by DonSchap; 09-08-2010 at 05:34 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  2. #2472
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    76
    Very nice photo of the wasp. That Minolta lens looks like a great lens. Well done.

    Don`t forget the person that holds the lens....

  3. #2473
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Mount Pleasant, SC
    Posts
    145
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    a little fill flash would have gone a long way in "popping" this image. You need to remember, when you frame and shoot, more often than not, the eyes go to the brightest point in the image. Unfortunately, it's not the flower in your exposure.

    I used a rendering technique with a type of fill flash ... to highlight the image. You tell me ...
    Try and see that background white spot to the left of the flower is sneaking in there. A slight slide to the right would have hidden it. By brightening the flower, we can diminish the effect. It is a nice shot ...
    Don, Sruprise... I did use "Fill Flash" on the HVL-F42AM Flash
    The original picture was 2.03 meg, so I did a minor pp in Elements 7 before posting. I cropped out a stem on the left side and resized it. I guess the issue is more my "perception" of level. I thought the flower was appropriately lit. I do see your point about the bright spot to the left of the flower. Guess It's a learning curve and all about individual observations. Thanks for all the input and compliments. I think I should start shooting in RAW so that I can get more correctability for my lack of equipment/experience. This shot was actually done with the kit lens. I was also shooting waterfalls and kids sliding in the water. Didn't want to get any of my other lenses wet. Luckily nothing got wet this day.
    Last edited by joenmell; 09-08-2010 at 07:45 AM.
    Joe Holmes
    Sony α550
    Sony HVL-F42AM Flash
    Sony DT18-55 F3.5-5.6 (Kit Lens)
    Minolta Maxxum 50 1:1.7(22) Prime
    Minolta 35-70 F4 (Mini Beercan)
    Minolta 70-210 F4 (Beercan)
    Minolta 28-135 F4-4.5 (This beast is pretty heavy)
    Minolta Maxxum 100-200 F4.5
    Quantaray D28-90 1:3.5-5.6 Ver 5
    Tamron DiII 55-200 1:4.5-6

  4. #2474
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Mount Pleasant, SC
    Posts
    145

    Beary Nice

    While in Town Hendersonville, North Carolina, I ran across a bear statue which had been painted. They have these in front of most of the major stores in town. I really liked this one and decided to photo it for you guys to enjoy. Please let me know what you think. Again only PP was Resize and crop. Taken with Alpha 200 using a Tamron DiII 55-200 4.5-6
    Flash used: No
    Focal Length: 160mm
    F-Number F/4.5
    Exposure Time: 1/250
    Metering Mode: Pattern
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Joe Holmes
    Sony α550
    Sony HVL-F42AM Flash
    Sony DT18-55 F3.5-5.6 (Kit Lens)
    Minolta Maxxum 50 1:1.7(22) Prime
    Minolta 35-70 F4 (Mini Beercan)
    Minolta 70-210 F4 (Beercan)
    Minolta 28-135 F4-4.5 (This beast is pretty heavy)
    Minolta Maxxum 100-200 F4.5
    Quantaray D28-90 1:3.5-5.6 Ver 5
    Tamron DiII 55-200 1:4.5-6

  5. #2475
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    LoL! Joe, you fooled us both with that one.
    If anything I would have expected some O/E with flash not the reverse. HoHum!

    The Bear's looking good, although I wouldn't have chosen Pattern Metering for the shot, did you use levels on it?

  6. #2476
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Mount Pleasant, SC
    Posts
    145
    Okay Peek... I don't know what you mean when you ask if I used "levels"...(Still uneducated).
    Also, I'm not real clear on what the difference is using "Pattern Metering" Just thought it would be the best mode. Probably leave it set in this position all the time. Once again, uneducated. (Sorry Don)
    Thanks for the compliment anyway
    Joe Holmes
    Sony α550
    Sony HVL-F42AM Flash
    Sony DT18-55 F3.5-5.6 (Kit Lens)
    Minolta Maxxum 50 1:1.7(22) Prime
    Minolta 35-70 F4 (Mini Beercan)
    Minolta 70-210 F4 (Beercan)
    Minolta 28-135 F4-4.5 (This beast is pretty heavy)
    Minolta Maxxum 100-200 F4.5
    Quantaray D28-90 1:3.5-5.6 Ver 5
    Tamron DiII 55-200 1:4.5-6

  7. #2477
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    OK Joe, the A200 has three metering options; 40 segment, Center weighted average and Spot.
    The first looks at the whole image and averages out.
    The second looks at a more central region and averages out.
    The last one meters only from the centre spot area.

    If you look at the Bear image, you can see that the distant areas behind it contain bright areas that we don't care about but Pattern Metering will include them in it's calculations. Seeing as they are quite bright, you may well underexpose your main subject, the Bear.

    Using either of the other two modes you can exclude the bright areas and give a better exposure of the subject. The only problem is that the Bear has a shiny surface and specular reflections can give a false reading so I would probably choose to "Spot" meter off a non reflective bit of the Bear, like the Butterfly and lock the setting with the "AEL" button before recomposing and taking the shot.

    Another tip is to zoom in so that the Bear fills the frame, lock the meter with the "AEL" button, zoom back out and take the shot.

  8. #2478
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Quote Originally Posted by S3000 View Post
    Very nice photo of the wasp. That Minolta lens looks like a great lens. Well done.

    Don`t forget the person that holds the lens....
    Thanks, I may start a new thread to discuss my Macro lenses and stuff.

    Meanwhile...

    Another view of

    YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBOURHOOD WASP

    Name:  144 Wasp 0005.jpg
Views: 47
Size:  564.6 KB

    Camera: Sony DSLR-A900
    Lens: Minolta MD Macro Rokkor 100mm f4
    Focal Length: 100mm
    ISO Speed: 320
    29th August 2010

  9. #2479
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Mount Pleasant, SC
    Posts
    145
    Once again, I thank you for the information. Now I have a project question.
    Our local Middle School has been graced with a gift from the US Naval Nuclear Power Training School. They are sending Students (Sailors) to the school tomorrow to paint the entire Fine Arts building (inside, flourescent light). I have been asked to come early and bring my Alpha to "document the activities of the day". This will be for fun, is nothing "Official" and no monetary compensation. My questions is, Which of my available lenses would be the best suited for this type of activity? I am leaning towards the Tamron DiII 55-200 which is 4.5-6, but also have the Quantaray D28-90 which is 3.5-5.6(includes the "D" capabilities and is wider) but might not be the better quality lens. And, last (and certainly least) I have the "Kit" lens.
    I will bring the F42AM flash so I believe that lighting will not be an issue. Just don't want to mess this one up. Probably just throw the thing into "auto" and shoot away. What Don calls "Assault Photo".
    I figure if I take 500 photo's at least 50 will be useable.
    Any input will be appreciated....
    Joe Holmes
    Sony α550
    Sony HVL-F42AM Flash
    Sony DT18-55 F3.5-5.6 (Kit Lens)
    Minolta Maxxum 50 1:1.7(22) Prime
    Minolta 35-70 F4 (Mini Beercan)
    Minolta 70-210 F4 (Beercan)
    Minolta 28-135 F4-4.5 (This beast is pretty heavy)
    Minolta Maxxum 100-200 F4.5
    Quantaray D28-90 1:3.5-5.6 Ver 5
    Tamron DiII 55-200 1:4.5-6

  10. #2480
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Light or the lack of it will be your problem. Even fairly small rooms seem quite dim when you're at f5.6.

    You should definitely take the 50mm prime and use your feet to zoom.
    There is no "D" so no distance information but it still does TTL metering which is all you really need anyway.
    Ideally, you would green gel the flash to match the Fluorescent lighting but I guess it may be too late for that.
    Try and work it at f2.8 or more for best sharpness although f2 will still be pretty good.
    Working at these larger apertures will work your flash less hard so the batteries will last longer if that's an issue.

    I'd take the Mino 100-200 f4.5 lens as well. I'm not familiar with the Tamron but I had a Mino for several years and can tell you that it's very good wide open (f4.5).
    I doubt you'll need anything longer than 100mm.

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