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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,161
    Who the heck was nibbling on my mince pie!! Going to post a pic of the Christmas pudding? man I need to go and pick up some Samuel Smith's winter welcome!
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
    Tokina AF 28-70mm F/3.5-4.5
    Tokina AF AT-X 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6
    http://flickr.com/

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    37

    Moon shot from last week

    Here's my first ever attempt at taking a Moon shot!!
    Didn't come out quite as expected, but that's why I thought of posting it to get your ideas on how to improve.

    Properties
    Lens - Minolta 75-300mm f4.5-5.6
    Focal length - 300mm
    f5.6
    1/250
    ISO 400
    -1 EV
    White balance - auto
    Metering mode - multi
    AF - Centre
    Steady shot - On
    Tripod - Yes

    Think afterwards I may have increased the exposure and maybe the brightness too.
    I had to zoom in 100% to get this and then crop it. I read some where I'm supposed to "lock the mirror", I had a look through the manual but couldn't figure out how to do this. Also I don't have a Shutter release

    So.. can this be improved just using settings and technique?
    Is there any hope?
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    -------------
    Sony Alpha 200
    Minolta AF 50mm f1.7
    Tokina AF 28-70mm f2.6-2.8
    Sony DT 18-70mm f3.5-5.6
    Minolta AF 70-210mm f4

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    Well ... at 1/250th sec ... movement is of little concern. The biggest issue is sharper focus and a bit more contrast. Moonshots are very popular. In fact, there is a whole section in the "Gallery" (<- click on this), I believe, dedicated to it, along with settings to try. The biggest issue ... is the lens. As you can see ... yours happens to be "soft" at infinity. Most are. But then again, there are those that are not ... and that is the lens you need to seek out and "borrow" to do this correctly. Some shoot "killer sharp" at the long end and at inifinty.

    Good luck on your search. The Moon will wait until you get back ...
    Last edited by DonSchap; 12-09-2008 at 10:33 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,424
    just to add to Don's comments, you;re also shooting that lens wide open and fully extended. i;d suggest that is probably its absolute weakest point so you;re not giving it a chance.

    shoot it at its critical aperture, (where its sharpest), and work everything else around that. my guess would be that its at f8. iso should always be 100. no reason to use 400 at all.
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    37
    Thanx Rooz, yea that makes a lot of sense. I probably should have mentioned that I took the photos on Shutter priority. But thinking about it now I should have used Manual focus isnt it?

    Sharper focus and more Contrast, thanx Don. I was going to take some shots tonight but it's been cloudy all night. I'll have to wait


    Question - This is on another topic. I've got an Alpha 200 and I took some photos indoor at low light the other day. (I had some trouble with this before so I brought it up a while ago on a thread, and you guys gave me some good instructions, thanx)
    So all is well but I find that at ISO 400 and above, there's a lot of grain. Is this normal?
    -------------
    Sony Alpha 200
    Minolta AF 50mm f1.7
    Tokina AF 28-70mm f2.6-2.8
    Sony DT 18-70mm f3.5-5.6
    Minolta AF 70-210mm f4

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Cool ISO in "lower-end" cameras

    When you "up" the ISO, you are telling the SENSOR to work a lot harder to try and resolve the image (the light coming through the lens). Above ISO-400, on the introductory cameras, is an area that begins to "breakdown" and the image becomes noticeably "strained." You will get a brighter image, along with all sorts of "extra" data that needs to be cleaned out (disguised) by post-processing software (i.e., Noise Ninja or others).

    From my personal experience, on the α700 camera, that breakdown of image quality usually occurs above ISO-1600, but that is also contingent upon how much light you have to begin with. Given certain lighting conditions and a digital sensor can generate noise at almost any ISO, it is just that some are better about not doing it than others.

    Anyway ... this is just another reason to invest in a better body. The one thing bear in mind is that your digital camera body and its associated sensor IS your "FILM." The better the sensor ... the better the "FILM."

    As the character Dirty Harry says at the end of the film, Magnum Force: "A man's got to know his limitations." Believe me when I say that it applies with photography equipment quite a bit.

    When you are shooting a bright object ... drop your ISO to 100 or 200. Do not have it up at 400 or higher. You only do that to speed up your shot, which means you would have completely LOST the shot, had you not ramped up the shutter speed to "catch it." It is a photographer's decision, at that point. You are struggling to get the "best shot" with what you have available to you. The safest bet is to consider ISO-400 and ISO-800 indoor ISO ONLY, there is no reason to use it outdoors, normally, if the sun is up and it is not an eclipse.

    I also recommend: Manual Mode; Aperture = f/4 or f/5.6; Shutter speed = 1/60; & ISO-400 for most indoor flash shots.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 12-10-2008 at 11:11 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    37
    Thanx Don, you truly are "The Don" of SLRs...hehe

    I knew the Alpha 200 is an entry level DSLR but didn't realise how important the sensor will be in all this. Having only bought it a few months ago I won't look at replacing it just yet, I've still got a lot to learn on all this.

    I d/l Noise Ninja (free version) to see how it goes, but it seems to only work with compatible programmes like Photoshop which I don't have.
    To be honest I've just been using the Sony software that came with the camera for post-processing and sometimes PhotoScape..
    I tried Gimp but found my "tad bit outdated" laptop couldn't handle it
    Time for a new laptop too I suppose

    Oh.. and I might have a solution for the "low light" issue after all, in the form of a lens..
    I bought a Minolta 50mm f1.7, which should be arriving any day. I'll keep you posted on how that goes
    -------------
    Sony Alpha 200
    Minolta AF 50mm f1.7
    Tokina AF 28-70mm f2.6-2.8
    Sony DT 18-70mm f3.5-5.6
    Minolta AF 70-210mm f4

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Drove down to the beach to get a few shots. It was a cloudy day. Not the best image. I will go back on a brighter day.
    Frank

    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Shaunz You are going to love that Minolta 50mm for indoor portraits. I just picked one up a bout a month ago.
    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Frank, it doesn't look too sharp; were you using the Tamron?

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