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Thread: Sony 72 dpi

  1. #1
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    Sony 72 dpi

    Why does Sony use 72 dpi for its jpg where others use up to 300 dpi for jpgs?
    A.J.

    Hey this looks dangerous.......You go first!

    If at first you don't succeed, Skydiving is not for you!

  2. #2
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    If at first you don't succeed, Skydiving is not for you!

    LMAO!!!!!

  3. #3
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    Does it really matter? Correct me if I'm wrong, but in Photoshop you can alter the DPI to whatever number you like without affecting the image quality? Isn't it actually just an instruction for the printer?

  4. #4
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    72 dpi is standard WEB resolution, meaning SONY JPG images are directly ready for web publication. What does that mean ... I still have to resize to 800x600 for most shots I put up.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #5
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    Yeah, I have been shooting RAW and haven't noticed that yet. IIRC 72dpi is also the highest resolution you can detect on a computer monitor. This became incredibly obvious in my days at Kinko's. Customers would bring in photos that looked great on the screen at 72dpi, then the prints would look horrible unless at about 200 dpi or better.
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

  6. #6
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    The DPI attached to the image file you get from the camera means very little. It's simply a ratio of the stated dimensions of the image to the number of pixels in the image. But since you can change the stated dimensions at will, you can change the DPI at will. DPI only becomes relevant when you print an image at a specific size.

    To make the math easier, assume it was 100 DPI. If you camera is takes images that are 3000x4000 pixels, it would be listed as 30"x40" inches at 100 DPI. Change the DPI to 300 and you end up with an image listed at 10"x13.33". But no pixels would have changed, it's the exact same set of bits. Nothing matters until you choose a DPI for printing.

  7. #7
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    Thanks guys. I also found this...

    http://www.rideau-info.com/photos/mythdpi.html
    A.J.

    Hey this looks dangerous.......You go first!

    If at first you don't succeed, Skydiving is not for you!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AJ Gressette View Post
    Thanks guys. I also found this...

    http://www.rideau-info.com/photos/mythdpi.html
    Good link, it's much easier to understand than the Wikipedia's article on DPI or PPI in digital image files.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Very good explanation David...

    Thanks

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