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Thread: Metz vs Sunpak

  1. #11
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    We are talking about a 60th of a second pulse. Just don't burp.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

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  2. #12
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    Don, neat photo with the multi flash units, very very cool that you can see the "deer" in the scope also! good thing thats not a real one, I don't belive even in your state you can "strobe" hunt the little buggers!
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  3. #13
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    Or hunt with a crossbow either. I know you can't in NY and NJ.
    Frank
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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

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  4. #14
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    I set up that particular shot to demonstrate multiple flash ideas for my college Photographic Lighting class. No one else was taking these initiatives and I wanted to "kick some LIBERAL butt." These artsy-fartsy pansies teaching at the school have never seen the business-end of most weapons ... and I felt it was time for a change.

    I only had all these flashes because of the school. At $500 each ... well, do the math. My bag is not that big. I'm not "CDI". LOL

    I have since gone with four much heavier studio strobes (3x 750W and a 125W "hair strobe") and trimmed back to the two portable elex flash units (HVL-F56AM & HVLF36AM).

    Who knows? I may try another of these flashy midnight shots, for the fun of it, when it warms up a bit. The setup time is nearly 30-minutes ... for a 5-minute shot.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 12-03-2008 at 07:41 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #15
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    O.K. as someone with only a pop up flash so far, it probably doesn't matter to me but what is a hair strobe Don? And speaking of business end, what about the point of impact. I have thought it would be cool to try and capture bullets impacting cardboard targets, or maybe BIF bullets in flight, is that realistic or possible with the a7oo? any comments suggestions or websites to read?
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    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
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  6. #16
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    so what do you guys set you WB to when using a flashgun?
    so fat i've been using Flash WB +3 to retain the warmness of the inside shots.
    Canon EOS 7D

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  7. #17
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    I saw someone using an airgun in one hand to shoot grapes and a camera in the other hand to record the impact. It worked too but, for the life of me, I can't remember the website where I saw it. I doubt you could do it with a proper gun unless the bullet triggered the camera by passing an infra red (or similar) sensor.

  8. #18
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    Lightbulb Lighting ... in short

    Quote Originally Posted by seanhoxx View Post
    O.K. as someone with only a pop up flash so far, it probably doesn't matter to me but what is a hair strobe Don?
    A hair light or strobe illuminates the hair from behind, giving it a kind of "glow" or halo-effect. It helps outline dark hair
    and if done properly, works well on blondes against color-backgrounds.

    So you have your:
    1. Background light (strobe) (this sets your color and brightness) It removes any shadows cast on the background
    2. Hair light - Illuminates the hair specifically, usually above and behind the subject
    3. Kicker light (also known as the accent light or garlic light) and "kicks" some light onto the side of the subject's dark
      hair opposite of the main light side. This light should "connect" with the hair light and the main light so the hair is lit from
      all sides (wrap around lighting) and will make the subjects hair look great and keep it from blending in with a dark background.
    4. Main light provides contrast from one side of the face to the other because it is more powerful than the fill light and
      will cast a shadow onto the opposite side. It should only illuminate the subject. A broad light source (such as a softbox) will cast
      a soft shadow. A hardlight source (such as a straight 16 inch parabolic reflector) will cast a harder shadow. The closer the light
      source is to the subject the softer the light appears.
    5. Fill light is a broad light source usually placed behind the photographer and fills in the shadows. It will provide illumination
      to everything the lens of the camera will "see." This light will assure that your blacks will register with detail on your print. The fill
      should follow the nose of the subject. A fill metered at 2 stops less than the main will give you approximately a 3 to 1 ratio of
      highlight to shadow.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 12-04-2008 at 07:07 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #19
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    Umnnnnnnn ah o.k. Light really is a science isn't it, and all those have to be set up for distance and intensity and 'balanced' with the other lights? how long does setting up a average studio well lit shot take? sounds intersting and rather complex.
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    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
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  10. #20
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    This, I have to say, is an entirely different approach than daylight photography, where you are fighting a single and usually powerful source of light. Obviously, the "pop-up" is similar ... but, with TTL playing with the intensity ... still different.

    Studio lighting is more like a concert of sorts and it can take up to a 40-minutes or more to get the lighting "perfect." Once you do get it right ... it almost breaks your heart to have to tear it all down, again, You almost wish you had a line of "subjects" to pump through ... and just "get 'er done!"

    There are various ways to do it, successfully, but it usually requires a LIGHT METER. to speed things up ... and an appreciation of angles, distance, intensities and interactions. An important aspect to remember is that light builds on itself. When you cross lamps, you get MORE light in that area, if there is a reflective surface. Usually it is the background to tends to suffer this collection of excess light, so balancing your background light is critical, especially if you are using a GEL (colored film overlay) to create a "color" one.

    Anyway ... I encourage you to just up and run out to get five lamps and just try it out. The experience is a real eye-opener ... and suddenly you'll appreciate just how much "light rules" and the "rules of light."

    BTW: It is usually easier to start off with "hot lights" (Tungsten) and then graduate to strobes. Tungstens are usually fixed values and therefore allow you to use distance and reflecting methods to vary their intensity. Strobes are siimilar, but many have intensity varying knobs that effectively "back them off" without having to move them. Normally, you have to discharge them, after changing this variable value, and allow them to recharge to the new setting for light measurement. It does makes your measurement process a little more INTENSE.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 12-05-2008 at 08:26 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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