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  1. #21
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    Nov 2008
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    176
    i think im crazy though been here 2 and a half days taken like 700 photos

  2. #22
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    Nov 2008
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    176
    no problem seemed a little out of character but oh well no harm no foul. Are they decent photos or you just saying that

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,557
    You are doing superior work with the camera ... you may continue ... LOL

    I am happy to hear that the setting suggestions are producing some satisfying results.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 12-01-2008 at 09:40 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #24
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    Nov 2008
    Posts
    176
    it has been real fun exploring the possibilities with this camera. Im just amazed how quick it is and what quality prints it will take. I still have no idea what im doing but am confident with the help from this board i will do just fine. The only advice i didnt take was the tripod and i believe the fireworks prints came out really good. Very pleased overall.

  5. #25
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    Nov 2008
    Posts
    176
    Don you didnt have to take the marquis down either i thought it was funny my wife thought it was strange thats why i wrote to you also when you were giving me poiters on the first 2 shots i didnt really no what you were talking about can you explain were either of those first ones good or what did i need to do different.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    9,557

    Lightbulb constructive creation ...

    You are getting the intensity of the color ... which is the most important part of shooting lights, without over-exposure. I'm not sure if your wanted the crowd's faces ... but, you have a hint of them.

    Rememeber, the rules of light are for the use of the photographer to "paint" his/her image with. Your understanding of these rules is key to your imaging ... and you ask yourself that creative question, "What am I trying to depict?"

    I and others can only try to assertain your intent. You can either make it easier or harder on the viewer to do so.

    Ask yourself, when you frame, "What is the subject?" If that is clear with what you see, then you have to use the surroundings to compliment or support that subject.

    The images you have offered, so far, seems to capture the light quite well ... and the subject in the street shots appears to be the "light display", so it works out. You need to be cognizant of your horizon and verticals, as that when they are askew, it is distracting and something that "photographers" deal with initially, before they push the shutter release ... otherwise, it has that "rushed" look about it and almost snapshot-like.

    When you frame, try and minimize what is termed negative-space. Negative space is usually border area that does nothing to support the subject. It usually can be cropped out, in post-processing, but then you reduce your overall resolution of the image. Try and consider the "cropping" BEFORE you take the shot and get the most from your image.

    I am not saying to crowd the image, just be aware of undistinguished lead-in areas and too much sky. Try and "balance" the aspects of the image, by chopping the frame into a grid of two horizontal lines and two vertical ones. This is called "the rule of thirds." It tends to "de-centralize" the image, so everything does not wind up in the middle and the viewers eyes move across the image, looking for additional "sub-subjects" and attractive details.

    Name:  GOTG-From-the-west-thirds.jpg
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    It does require some planning to your shot ... and often repositioning, but makes for a less boring presentation with a bunch of 'portrait-looking" images.

    Also, look BEHIND your subject and make sure you are not capturing a distraction or improper "sub-subject." Not everything in an image is desireable ... you need to constantly weed through the shot, to ensure the camera (which misses nothing) does not pick up "undesireables." A lot of new photographers tend to blow right past this part, concentrating entirely on their subject and forgetting all about "the rest of the picture." Sure, post-processing can address a lot of this, but I argue, "Wouldn't it be a lot easier to avoid having to address it, then, and get a better shot beforehand?" Keep your eyes moving ... scanning the frame for problems, of course, if time allows ... because the world is in motion and things can change very fast.

    Hey, good luck and I hope you enjoy the rest of your "shoot."
    Last edited by DonSchap; 12-03-2008 at 12:23 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Newcastle upon Tyne, England
    Posts
    51
    just to let you know that there is more than one student here lol. Great advice... I'm loving it!!

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    848
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post

    Rememeber, the rules of light are for the use of the photographer to "paint" his/her image with. Your understanding of these rules is key to your imaging ... and you ask yourself that creative question, "What am I trying to depict?"

    I and others can only try to assertain your intent. You can either make it easier or harder on the viewer to do so.

    Ask yourself, when you frame, "What is the subject?" If that is clear with what you see, then you have to use the surrounding like to compliment or support that subject.


    Also, look BEHIND your subject and make sure you are not capturing a distraction or improper "sub-subject.
    very good points, being conscious of that can make a big difference and reveal the mistakes in the photo you're about to take

    I've been a naughty person with not focusing whats behind the person...

    in all great shots Millz you have quite a natural understanding, if you keep listening to us and tweaking your ability you'll start producing better shots and I'd say you're better than I at landscape shooting already
    Quote Originally Posted by Rooz View Post
    hands up who hates delobbo !!!!!!
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    Canon 450D + Twin Kit Lens + 50mm 1.4
    It doesn't have to be awkward Will

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    176
    Man its amazing what you can pick up just lerking on here I didnt realize how fun it could be though my wife thinks im out of my mind. I just never realized how good photos could be until i got this camera and im very pleased. just these shot and i wil post more when i get home so i can get feedback but even not knowing what im doing this takes better photos than any camera ive ever had.Dare i say idiot proof lol

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,557

    Cool Sage advice ...

    It has been said many times before, but what the hell, it is worth saying again ...

    "Knowledge is power"


    Use it well.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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