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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    35

    my new(to me) ebay lens

    i just picked this up off e-bay, a Minolta Normal AF 50mm f/1.7 Autofocus Lens.
    it also came with these Filters(straight from e-bay ad) all for $107 shipped

    Olympus Skylight 1A
    Prinz Split Focus +2
    Pro C8 (or possibly CS - this is a minutely etched starlight filter)
    Prinz PL (marked 504, this is a circular polarizing filter)
    Pro 1A
    Prinz 25A (this is a red filter, so clearly the original owner was interested in B&W)

    my questions are what would one use a split focus lens for? and why
    is the red filter used for B&W? i've never seen a split focus before.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Cool Splitting up is hard to do ... or something like that

    Quote Originally Posted by scotts630 View Post
    my questions are what would one use a split focus lens for? I've never seen a split focus before.
    I have one of these things, too.

    The split-focus lens was developed so that you could focus on two subjects. Yeah, no kidding. One on one side of the frame and one on the other ... but closer.

    I tried this out in a studio setting and it is a little difficult to work with, unless you have some experience with it and a patient subject (preferrably only one human). One side should not alter the focus at all (call it "normal") ... the other does a "close-up action."

    It's like taking a "close-up" filter, cutting it in two pieces and then tossing half of it away.

    So, let's say you are taking an image of subject #1, twenty-feet away, but your other subject (subject #2) is about 10-feet away. Normally, it would just about be impossible to take this shot without having an aperture set to f/22 or f/32, and even that may not cover it, in order to increase the depth of field (DOF) to include both subjects.

    Now, we snap on the split-focus filter. You manually focus (because autofocus is useless once this filter is mounted) on subject #1 (twenty-feet away) with the ordinary focus. You rotate the filter to cover subject #2 (ten-feet away) ... and low and behold, they are BOTH in focus. TAKE THE SHOT!

    Anyway ... use of this filter is tedious, at best. It helps if you have a lot of patience and time to work with it ... focusing on inanimate objects to understand the clear effect it has with using different apertures and different focus points. If you are young ... you have a lot more time to play with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by scotts630 View Post
    and what is the red filter used for B&W?
    As you will eventually find out, if you do not already know, passing light through a filter either enhances or degrades the color or brilliance of the light spectrum. They may also alter the trajectory of the light so that it changes before it hits the media in the camera (sensor or film) in a predictable way.

    To fully grasp the idea of colored filters, you need to douse yourself in "Color Theory". Please read through the following online link (<- click on this) ... and we shall discuss it and ...

    the color wheel, afterwards.

    Name:  Color-Wheel.jpg
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    Another excellent short reference can be found at this LINK, on Wikipedia. I highly recommend reading the entire piece (definitely worth the effort), but your question is directly answered under "Contrast Enhancement"
    Last edited by DonSchap; 11-20-2008 at 10:54 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    35
    so by using a red filter, you're only allowing red light to pass, so the whole picture would just be lighter and darker shades of red? so this makes it easier than messing with all the colors? and shows more contrast, or something along those lines? sorry never was to good at art class, but i did stay within the lines i just show your edit piece from your last post, so it is about contrast
    Last edited by scotts630; 11-20-2008 at 10:52 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    35
    so is there a big need or big difference in digital?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Cool Filtering for effect ... it's not all B&W

    Apparently, as you have BOTH the Polarizer and the red filter.

    The red filter makes the bright greens darker and reds and yellows lighter. When you are working with B&W, it is all in shades of gray ... so if you can enhance the number of grays ... by use of the filter, it makes for a more detailed image.

    Quote Originally Posted by scotts630 View Post
    so is there a big need or big difference in digital?
    Shooting in color, the red filter is almost never used. I have several colored filters in my filter bag ... and film was the last time they saw the light of day. So, in effect, the answer is "no."

    Any real filtration, other than ND (Neutral Density) or (CP) Circular Polarization, should probably be left to post-processing, where you have almost unlimited control of the intensity and depth of any color alteration. You can even control B&W color filters in PS CS3. That's pretty convenient and reduces the need for a filter bag, for sure.

    Please consider that the digital darkroom did not exist for film photography. Almost all image effects had to take place before the light struck the film ... and filters were an absolute necessity. Now ... not so much!

    Digital filters offer a bit more ...

    From this ...
    Name:  _DSC5671-7-3-2008-PR.jpg
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    To this!
    Name:  _DSC5671-7-3-2008-PR rework.jpg
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    OR ...

    This ...
    Name:  PR-Firework-2008.jpg
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    to THIS!
    Name:  twirl-extrude-acented-edges--fireworks.jpg
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    Try that with an optical filter!
    Last edited by DonSchap; 11-20-2008 at 11:15 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    35
    Thanks Don, as far as post processing i try to keep it to a minimum since
    i need to work on more basic stuff ie...... gotta make sure picture is straight before Don sees it ,but because you point them out, they stick in my mind,
    most the time when i shot now.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Thumbs up Good job!

    Truer words, my friend, were never spoken. Solid fundamentals are the critical aspects upon which we hang all our photographic magic.

    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,161
    Another good read Don, the first article is printed out and is going in my big book of things to remember. Someday I do want to get a I/R filter and play with infared images a bit, I know thats a whole other area and learning curve LOL!
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
    Tokina AF 28-70mm F/3.5-4.5
    Tokina AF AT-X 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6
    http://flickr.com/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Sean, I also wanted to get a IR filter. I forgot all about it until now. What lens would you get it for? I have tried to use Realgrain Plugin to make some IR images but it isn't the same thing.
    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    Quote Originally Posted by sparkie1263 View Post
    Sean, I also wanted to get a IR filter. I forgot all about it until now. What lens would you get it for? I have tried to use Realgrain Plugin to make some IR images but it isn't the same thing.
    Frank
    I would get a large a large enough size so that it fits several of your lenses. I would say at least a 67mm filter so that it will work on the Tamron 17-50mm (67mm) and 16-80CZ (62mm)
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

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