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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1

    Looking for new camera

    I am looking to get a replacement camera for my wife but not really too sure where to start. I found this forum, so I'd figure I'd start here.

    Our biggest thing is to find something with a fast shutter speed. The Olympus' we have now takes too long to snap a shot. With our daughter being only a year old, it's hard to capture the moments already, but with the wasted time waiting for the cam to shoot, it's guaranteed that we'll have to try again.

    A friend has a Canon and it is very fast to snap a pic. As long as the replacement can take a quick pick, has good/great image quality, is compact, and will last awhile, she'll be happy.

    Here is the requested info.. THANKS!!!!

    [Budget]
    $300USD or less

    [Size]
    Preferably Compact

    [Features]
    MP- At least 5
    OpticalZoom- At least 3x
    ImageQuality (1-10)- 8
    ManualControls?- No preference

    [General Usage]
    Use- Pictures of daughter
    PrintSize- Largest size that we would most likely print would be 8x10
    Indoor/Low light?- Some, but I guess the flash will help!
    Sports/Action?- Negative.

    [Miscellaneous]
    Brands- We have 2 olympus cameras but we've heard a lot of good things about Canon, so we're thinking of getting a Canon
    Models- Negative

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,173
    Your problem isn't fast shutter speed; it's something called shutter lag. That's the delay from the time you push the button to the time the camera takes the picture. No Point and Shoot will eliminate shutter lag, for that you need a DSLR. But with any camera you can pre-focus by pushing the shutter button down halfway to lock on the subject and then the picture will take when you push the button down the rest of the way.

    Is sounds like you don't want to use manual controls. Do you want compact (fit in a jacket pocket) or ultracompact (fit in a pants pocket)? You could do fine with something like a Canon A1000 or A2000 if compact is OK. If you want tiny the SD1100 or SD790 should work. But with all these cameras, learning to pre-focus will help with the shutter lag problem.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    western US
    Posts
    1,218
    Also, shot-to-shot timings will vary, depending on whether you are using flash. As a general rule the cameras with dedicated batteries have a flash advantage over the AA cameras. For timings without flash, this site can be a help -

    http://www.cameras.co.uk/html/shutte...omparisons.cfm

    Kelly Cook

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    33
    Quote Originally Posted by NACQBoy View Post
    Our biggest thing is to find something with a fast shutter speed. The Olympus' we have now takes too long to snap a shot. With our daughter being only a year old, it's hard to capture the moments already, but with the wasted time waiting for the cam to shoot, it's guaranteed that we'll have to try again.
    When it comes to trying again, I believe a second child may be a bit more expensive than your proposed maximum $300 budget.

    You don't say which Olympus you have, and how long is too long from the time you press the button until the shutter opens. What happens if you press the button halfway first?

    The shutter button lag is going to depend on how quickly the necessary shot setup can be done. From when you start to press the button, all automatic cameras have to meter, set white balance, and focus for you before they can fire the shutter. Focusing especially is going to be more difficult in lower light, such as is typical indoors; low light photography will slow the entire process.

    For the quickest autofocus in low light situations, or for rapidly moving subjects like kids, you might want to consider a used $100 SLR or an entry level DSLR. Don't underestimate the modern ease and low cost of having a roll of 24 slides developed and scanned automatically for you; I still use my 1980 Nikon FE for such people shots.

    However, with a little prep, a digital point-and-shoot can still be made to work. For a compact which must rely upon contrast dectection for focusing, consider one that has an AF-assist lamp. The downside is cats and children will quickly learn that the amber AF-assist lamp turning on might mean a flash is coming, and they may flee or look away.

    Also make sure that the compact you're getting gives you the opportunity to press the shutter button halfway to do the focus setup. You can pause there, reframing as necessary, until the moment is right to actually take the shot, with the remainder of the "shutter lag" imperceptible to the human nervous system.

    I believe all modern point-and-shoots offer a half-press to set up the metering and focus. I know the Nikons I bought in 2000 do. I also know the Canons do, as it's how I can sometimes fool them (SD600, SD700, SD770, SD850) into taking well-exposed and in-focus shots of flower innards at sunset, or of rambunctious children opening birthday presents.

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