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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903

    Need some shot advice

    picked up the A200 and started taking portraits with the kit lens....
    i'm new to the DSLR world so i'm wondering if someone can advise me on how to bring out the ye colour in these shots.....

    the subject has light blue eyes but for some reason they are not being captured they way i would like them to be.
    granted it is a close-up and that there is too much shade but some advice would be appreciated.
    Taken in the Aperture mode.

    Last edited by Elisha; 10-14-2008 at 05:27 AM.
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    One of the problems with the kit lens is "wash-out." It is a "side-effect" of this plastic lens (18-70) and unfortunately is the very reason you need to upgrade your glass right out of the gate.

    Take some time to mount a TAMRON AF 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 XR Di-II LD Aspherical lens or a SONY DT 18-250 f/3.5-6.3 (effectively the same lens) which will quickly offer you much longer range and a overall terrific image to work with. This lens is a "one-lens" solution for most initial issues experienced by beginning photographers. But the proof is in the pudding, so my recommendation to personally try this lens out stands.

    You should shoot the two lenses (your 18-70 & the 18-250) side-by-side, and make note (write it down) of the frame counter number on each shot under which lens ... so that the comparison is clear and there is no confiusion. Shoot the same subject and if you cannot get a better image from the 18-250, please post the images for examination. I suspect, once you start using this lens, we may not hear from you for a while. It often tends to solve many things for the beginner. Call it a "quick fix" if you want, but there is nothing better than good quality glass to improve your images.

    Good luck and let us know if this was successful.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 10-14-2008 at 09:01 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    thanks for the input Don....unfortunately i wasn't supposed to be spending any money on more toys so i'm stuck with this setup for a little bit.
    although the purchase came with a second lens which was out of stock but i will be picking it up soon.

    It is either the SAL75300 75-300mm or the SAL55200 55-200mm. I forget which but i will have to go pick it up Wednesday!
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Lightbulb Some thoughts ...

    Honestly, it is a just a powerful suggestion for improving the overall performance of your new camera. I will defer to others who have not made this improvement and wish you the best of luck overcoming this substantial ... challenge.

    A couple quick Items as far a compositional issues;

    1) Do not shoot against blown out backgrounds, if at all possible. This tends to trick the camera into believing you have a brighter subject than is really there and will darken down the exposure accordingly. In the image you have provided, the right side is entirely ... well, take a look. That brillance causes the camera's program to clamp down on the aperture, ramp up the speed, or drop down the ISO. In your case, you were using aperture priority ... so only the speed and ISO were changing. In effect, they are trying to "counter" that light.

    2) Your best bet probably would be to have turned your subject 90 degrees (subject's back to the wall & your back to the parking lot, allowing all that reflected light to be behind you (the photographer) and then take your shot. Having the light sourced behind you is often the easiest to struggle against. Rarely, without the help of fill flash, does light "behind" the subject turn out something clear and usable.

    You also may want to pick up a book that discusses these considerations in much deeper detail.

    Understanding Exposure

    The book could, in effect, be of better use than any lens would.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 10-14-2008 at 09:37 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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