Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 41 to 50 of 50
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Brisbane, CA
    Posts
    3,591
    Those came out nice Tori. Was it a paying gig?
    Lukas

    Camera: Anonymous
    I could tell you but I wouldn't want you to get all pissy if it's the wrong brand

    Flickr

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Terra Australis Incognita
    Posts
    3,865
    Quote Originally Posted by Rooz View Post
    i'd also unbutton the jacket aswell cos the way it bunches up isnt very flattering for her.
    I think thats her shape Rooz.
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,421
    there are ways to make shapes less flattering though. sitting up strait and unbuttoning the jacket significantly changes the appearance in that mid area. she's not a big girl at all.
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Windy Wyoming, USA
    Posts
    2,605
    Thanks, guys! I'm glad you think well of them. The guy's eyes are so dark in the original, even RAW doesn't seem to have captured much detail so lightening them just turns them gray. I'm thinking it was my lighting, maybe if I'd had a softbox close to his face, or some other soft lighting coming from just below eye level, it might have opened up his eyes? What do you think?

    And unbuttoning the jacket is a great idea, I'll have to think of that next time. They are paying me some, (the most I've gotten for a gig so far) $150 including eight 8x10s. I know I could probably get more, but I'm just starting out with portraits and I appreciate their willingness to work with an unproven photographer.
    Nikon D50, Nikkor 18-55mm, Nikkor 50mm 1.8, Sigma 70-300mm APO DG Macro, Tokina 12-24
    Flickr

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,225
    If you have the space, you want your subject 5-6 feet in front of the backdrop. This allows the backdrop to go well out of focus, and you will definitely lose the wrinkles, even at f8. When you see commercial back drops, they look to be about 6-8 feet wide. This is so the edges stay out of the frame, even though they are well back from the subject.

    Also, he's slouching, and you are correct, both are leaning back just a bit. Have your subjects think of a string passing up through the spine and out the top of their head. Have them figuratively pull up on the string. It will straighten their spine and drop their shoulders (try it in front of a mirror, it looks like you gain about 2-3 inches ), giving them much better posture. Also, they will appear less passive and more engaged if they are directed to lean very slightly toward the camera, just as you would if you were talking to someone and trying to make a point.
    Eric Lund
    Nikon D200
    Nikkors: 17-55mm f2.8, 18-200mm f3.5-f4.5 VR, 70-300mm f4.5-5.6 VR, 35mm f2, 50mm f1.8, 55mm f2.8 AI-S micro, 105mm f2.8 VR micro
    Other Lenses: Tokina 12-24 f4, Tamron 75-300mm f4-5.6 LD macro
    Stuff: Nikon SB800, Nikon MBD200, Gitzo 1327 Tripod w/RRS BH-55LR Ballhead, Sekonic L-358 meter

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    8,163
    The SOOC shot looks best. Is your monitor calibrated? I suspect not.
    Ouch.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Terra Australis Incognita
    Posts
    3,865
    His eyes aren't very open I think that has kept the light out. Just a guess from a total portrait novice.

    And re Rooz's point of opening her jacket and sitting up straight. Call me a perv but I'd try for a pose, posture, atire and lighting that highlight some flattering curves. Didn't you tease Lukas about shooting his G/F with her arms pressed behind her back
    Last edited by Dread Pirate Roberts; 03-22-2009 at 04:45 AM.
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    8,163
    Quote Originally Posted by toriaj View Post
    They are paying me some, (the most I've gotten for a gig so far) $150 including eight 8x10s. I know I could probably get more, but I'm just starting out with portraits and I appreciate their willingness to work with an unproven photographer.
    Nothing wrong with that. I'm doing a free bridal shoot today because A) she's beautiful, B) bridals aren't big around here so I had to open her mind to it, C) she's beautiful, D) it's my first bridal shoot, and E) she's beautiful.
    Ouch.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Windy Wyoming, USA
    Posts
    2,605
    Thanks everyone. CDI, I think you're referring to the shots I posted in this thread a few months ago. From what I can tell, my monitor isn't too far off, it's my eye for skin tones that's off (especially when the photo was underexposed.) I have a Pantone Huey, but I couldn't get it to work right. Might try again later. DPR, I'm not sure about Lukas's girlfriend, but I agree that my shot could be more flattering. Thanks for all the tips on posing, Erich included.
    Nikon D50, Nikkor 18-55mm, Nikkor 50mm 1.8, Sigma 70-300mm APO DG Macro, Tokina 12-24
    Flickr

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    8,163
    I'm not very good at judging skin tones either tori. What I do (if I have time and/or remember) is hold up a grey card at my subject and meter that. I also take a picture of it to set a custom white balance. When I do that, I don't even have to adjust anything after the fact because it's spot on.

    You have to do it each time you change locations and/or the position of the subject relative to the light (on sunny days) and it doesn't work so well for exposure when the sun is constantly darting in and out of clouds, but if you can get do it it'll save you a lot of work later.

    I have a $250 Sekonic Light Meter too but I use the grey card more because I can't do a Custom White Balance with the meter.
    Ouch.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •