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  1. #11
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    Sorry, I meant the one you reposted. As DPR said it's a little underexposed, but that's easily fixed with a SS adjustment. I kind of got the feeling that the point of this was ambient light portraits, so I'm not sure flash would be the answer. I could be wrong though.
    Lukas

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  2. #12
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    DPR, I agree that #6 is underexposed. I would have needed to turn my ISO up to get a full stop higher exposure, which is fine, but I didn't think about it as we were moving around and trying different spots. Thanks be to RAW!

    I'm trying to learn about taking both flash portraits and natural light portraits, so all lighting comments are welcome These were all natural light, but pretty much that was because I thought the light would be nice on its own, and I didn't want to mess up by using too much flash. I definitely need more practice. I can see how flash would help me achieve that dark background "studio" look I was after.

    My processing also lightened the contrast. I wanted flattering lighting, that wouldn't draw attention to bags under the eyes, hollows around the smile, etc. At times I even specifically lightened those areas to look more flattering. I think that would have the effect of reducing the contrast. Please give me all your opinions about the skin tones. It seems that they look too warm to some people, too cool to others. Thanks again.
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  3. #13
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    Mar 2005
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    Overall nice job on your sister's portraits. Looks like she was having fun. I'm not really fond of the processing. That's the kind of light you want - slightly overcast or open shade. The un-edited of #6 is the best for me and agree it may be just slightly underexposed. They really wouldn't take much to process. Then again, it depends on the look you're going for. I'd say your camera settings are fine. It's a little difficult to say without seeing the originals. Here is my .02.

    #1 - The wet hair didn't help and the frizzies would take a bit to clean up. Maybe crop in just a bit closer (on right & top of photo). It's usually not a good ideal to crop at a joint, but this looks ok. Nice background separation.

    #2 - Nice pose. She could be more to the right side of frame.

    #3 - I like this one and her frizzies are starting to mellow. I like the pose and her expression.

    #4 - Good one. Pose is very well done. Would really like to see the original. Not too fond of the post for the background.

    #5 - I really like this pose and expression as well. Looks like some blown highlights and again, like to see the original as not fond of the post work.

    #6 - Eh, no on the post. I much prefer the original. Probably my favorite with #5 & #3 next. Well done on the capture.

    I think you did very well on the captures, it's just the post work I'm not too crazy about. Then again, it's only my opinion and it's the end result that you're looking for that matters. btw- you've got pm.
    Dennis

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  4. #14
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    Thanks Dennis, I'll look at those framing suggestions. Yeah, the black background was kind of an experiment just to see if it was possible. And also the only attractive background was the leaves. Thanks again for your comments, pm replied.
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  5. #15
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    This has helped me a lot, especially with the skin tones (which is what I wanted.) I reduced some yellow in the skin tones, and also some green in some of the shots, resulting in skin tones like this. I think it's a great improvement, what do you think?
    Name:  Josie Shed_5577 resized.jpg
Views: 170
Size:  211.4 KB
    Nikon D50, Nikkor 18-55mm, Nikkor 50mm 1.8, Sigma 70-300mm APO DG Macro, Tokina 12-24
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  6. #16
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    I like it Tori, it's a good result from your shoot.

    So what are you doing differently now for shoot 2 that you mentioned?
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  7. #17
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    Let's see, that shoot isn't really planned yet but when we do it again:

    1. Dry hair!
    2. No black shirt (if I want to try to recreate the black background, that is. I'd only do that if my cool brother is interested.)
    3. Try some fill flash if going for that dark background. Maybe try it in other shots too, just to get some experience with it.
    4. Better backgrounds, in particular I'd like to try some stone buildings/walls/steps
    5. Other poses, including more sitting and looking up at the camera, and maybe some full-body or tighter head shots.
    6. Try Daylight WB regardless of the weather (Auto and Cloudy seem to be too warm, as seen here) ... note to self, figure out custom WB.
    7. Consider higher ISO, tripod, and/or flash to enable use of smaller apertures.

    That's all I can think of for now, do you have any other suggestions?
    Last edited by toriaj; 10-15-2008 at 07:03 PM.
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  8. #18
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    Sep 2008
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    75
    As a complete amateur, only as a general audience 3 and 6 poses were the most compelling and expressive. PP was not probably needed on 3, it shows a more relaxed and natural rapport with the camera and setting. She looks more confident and self confident because she is better balanced between posture and shoulder alignment as when someone does not know they are being watched. For me, the relationship of the pose to the photographer trumps details of lighting. The background is interesting yet not distracting, with the light sparkling through the droplets on the wire fence is a great addition over the dark backgrounds of the others. This would be the one to present to your parents as a gift.
    Bringing the hands is also a plus. Can you post the unprocessed version of #3?
    5 has better detail in the eyes but 6 is a more "live" feel to it, particularly the unprocessed version. 1/2 between them would be better.
    Next time simplify her clothes for example the sweater over a crispt collar cotton shirt would have been all that was needed, but as it is, the white t-shirt is distracting because it is out of alighnment to the shirt or sweater in each shot except 6. Simple is better than layers and details that draw the eye.
    Overall, good work.

  9. #19
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    Thanks for your comments, stanj. Here's the original of #3:

    Name:  Josie crop_5601.jpg
Views: 80
Size:  111.9 KB
    Yes, the composition, I know, I know! What can I say, it was a sudden snapshot, I was moving around, trying to get different angles and keep her muddy flipflops out of the shot, and for some reason I had the camera in landscape orientation. And it's rather underexposed as well, I was trying not to blow out the highlights in the background. I almost sent this file to the Recycle Bin but I decided to keep it for the lighting and expression. And just as you said, this is the one that my mom asked for in an 8x10

    I agree with what you said about the pose and expression. My sister has a way of "zoning out" and making a really fake smile. The best thing I found was to tell her to make a funny face, then smile really really fast. Then I'd try to capture that smile before it went all fake. Do you have any suggestions for getting natural poses and expressions?
    Last edited by toriaj; 10-15-2008 at 07:47 PM.
    Nikon D50, Nikkor 18-55mm, Nikkor 50mm 1.8, Sigma 70-300mm APO DG Macro, Tokina 12-24
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by toriaj View Post
    Do you have any suggestions for getting natural poses and expressions?
    Now say "elephants undies"......"elephants ..shutter clicks.. undies"

    Works a treat on my kids
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

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