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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    2,562

    Lake in the woods HDR

    Here is another attempt at HDR of the lake

    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    Lightbulb Lake redone ...

    Much better, Frank ... here's mine!

    Name:  Redone-Lake_HDR2.jpg
Views: 105
Size:  159.8 KB

    I went for a less intense reflection ... to avoid blow out.

    Here's with diminished saturation

    Name:  Less-saturation-lake_HDR2.jpg
Views: 107
Size:  177.9 KB

    Which works for ya, Frank?
    Last edited by DonSchap; 09-20-2008 at 01:41 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Yours looks better. I was going to try to put a filter to cut the glare of the water. The first time I did it I save it at 32bit that is why I couldn't save it as a JPEG.
    Thanks
    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    Frank, I did post a series of HDR instructions for Photoshop to help. Were you aware of them?
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    No, I never seen them. Where are they posted?
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Thumbs up Lets make a High Dynamic Range image

    Life is so easy, these days ... look at Wall Street ... half-a-trillion of everyone's money to prop up the crooks! Remember that the next time an interstate bridge just up and decides to drop into a river without a warning, because we cannot afford to maintain it properly.


    Here's YOUR bail-out, my friend! LOL


    Producing a HDR
    1. ) Load into Adobe Photoshop CS2/3 your three or more exposures that your want to merge
    2. ) On Photoshop’s main menu: “File” > “Automate” > “Merge to HDR…
    3. ) In the “Merge to HDR” window, click on the “Add Open Files” button
    4. ) Ensure that all your images showed up (you will get a message if you have edited images and not saved them)
    5. ) Click “OK” button
    6. ) The program will them perform the HDR merge activity and yield a 32-bit image (which is not editable in that form)
    7. ) Use the slider under the histogram to set the “White Point” for a good, clear image.
    8. ) Click “OK” button
    9. ) You now need to covert this image to something you can edit in Photoshop. On the main menu: "Image" > "Mode" > "16bits/Channel…"
    10. ) A “HDR Conversion” widow will pop up that allows you to edit the “Exposure” and “Gamma” … this is very much “Brighntess” and “Contrast.” Adjust as needed to improve you image, then click “OK” button.
    11. ) You should now covert this image to something you can edit in almost any type JPG program. On the main menu bar: "Image" > "Mode" > "8bits/Channel…"
    12. ) Now, you can use other functions or filters or whatever you want to further edit to your like.


    Good luck!
    Last edited by DonSchap; 09-20-2008 at 02:42 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Thanks Don I missed a few steps. LOL
    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Wild, Wonderful, Wyoming
    Posts
    1,043
    Not trying to be a Canon jerk here, just trying to do some teaching. In the shot above there isn't really enough dynamic range to be HDR. You could have easily captured the above scene with just one exposure. An HDR blend can look downright unearthly to pretty natural, but all encompass a dynamic range closer to the 14 stops the human eye can see. Most of the examples I have seen in this forum are a pretty standard 5-8 stops.

    The purpose of HDR is to do just what you didn't here: save the highlights. Or shadows, or both.

    Here's an example:

    First exposure: This is how the camera meter said to expose this scene. Right down the middle. The clouds had a lot of color in them, but this exposure washes out that color. But the scene demands the foreground to be visible so the clouds are sacrificed.



    Second exposure: -2 EV. I used auto bracketing, but you could manually dial the exposure compensation in. This shot brings out the color in the clouds and a deeper blue in the sky. It also saturates the blacks in the scene.



    Third exposure: +2 EV. This one is to capture the highlights. The flowers are pretty bright, the highlights in the clouds, water, and rocks are all brought out by this washed out exposure.



    I use photomatix so I can't describe the steps from Photoshop, but I know the results are similar I have seen a lot of examples.
    Here is the HDR image. Slight crop, HDR generated with Photomatix and tone-mapped with Photomatix. This blend has about 14 stops of light.


    I see a lot of you in this forum have been experimenting with HDR lately. I haven't seen many photos here labeled as HDR, that, well, just aren't. Here are some tutorials and some fine to downright gaudy(even the gaudy ones look pretty cool)images.
    Vanilla Days

    Luminous Landscape

    Andre Gunther

    I am sorry I don't have very many PS examples, but I have never owned it. Good luck with your HDR, keep practicing. I see Don is advocating hand holding HDR shots, this is nearly impossible. In the one example he gave of the bridge, it's not bad for hand held but there is a lot of blurring in the distant vegetation. This is solely due to being hand held, no one can shoot three shots hand held and have them in perfect register with the other two, IS or not, you still move slightly between shots, that's all it takes. The absolute best way to shoot HDR is with support, whether or not you have IS. And with support your IS should be turned off. The only real way to hand hold an HDR shot is to use a single RAW file as in the examples from Andre Gunther.
    Last edited by TenD; 09-20-2008 at 06:21 PM.
    A good photograph is knowing where to stand.
    Ansel Adams

    Rule books are paper, they will not cushion a sudden meeting of stone and metal.
    Ernest K. Gann-Fate is the Hunter.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Very nice image.
    Thanks for your explanation
    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    So much for a learning curve. Once you try it ... you had better improve ... and quick, eh?

    My rationale is that if the HDR process enhances your original frame ... and improves the appearance overall, then, you have done a better job. If you are planning on going to extremes in your images, then you have chosen a differnet concept for HDR use. Just like ANY of the filters or digital options available to you with Photoshop or whatever program you want to use, you are altering the reality of the shot. The RAW image is the true picture the camera saw ... once that is processed, it is your concept from there on out.

    With fiilm, people invoked the use of creative filters before the light got to the emulsion. Afterwards, darkroom magic.

    With today's pixel manipulation ... you don't have to COMMIT your image to a lens filter (barring polarization and ND). Most "magic" can be done entirely after the image has been taken. HDR is a quicker way to enhance that which has either been lost to highlights being blown out ... or shadow overwhelming detail.

    The choice is the photographer's. I just suggest we produce the best and most enjoyable stuff we can. If we get smarter along the way ... well, accidents happen.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 09-20-2008 at 08:35 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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