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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    9,554

    Angry Ultra-wide fights

    A lot of people have addressed the issue of the Ultra Wide Angle (UWA) lens (zoom lenses 14mm or wider) and which one is "the best".

    Generally, these lenses run about $479-689 for the medium grade versions. These would be (Sony-mount) lenses such as:

    SIGMA 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC
    TAMRON SP AF 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 Di-II LD (not out yet - Nov '08)
    TAMRON SP AF 11-18mm f/4.5-5.6 Di-II LD Aspherical IF
    SONY AF DT 11-18mm f/4.5-5.6 D
    Minolta AF DT 11-18mm f/4.5-5.6 D (out of production)
    SIGMA 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6 EX Aspherical DG

    Tokina has no entries for the SONY/Minolta-mount

    Each has its advantage, but I want to reserve judgement on this issue until the New TAMRON comes out. I have my suspicions.

    I've been pretty pleased with the SIGMA 10-20, if you are in a hurry, you might give it a peek. Roughly $500.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 09-12-2008 at 08:39 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,161

    Low and wide

    I know a few of us are saying, "but Don thats a lot of money, how much would I use a UWA?" Again I suppose like most things if you have it you use it It is a well rounded lens bag that fills in the low end, a area I am very lacking in, the Tamron 17-50 is as low as I go right now, but thats not really wide is it. There are times now I feel I am not using the 17-50 "enough" for what I paid for it, but then I use it and every time I still go "Damn! thats a sweet lens!" As I understand it the main use of a UWA is in shooting buildings, bridges, other structures, wide landscapes? As that is among some of the least of my shooting a UWA will likely be among one of the last lenses I purchase. Unless of course the vet's in here can share some advice as to what else, and what other applications are the best for UWA? It's not a challenge, I don't know, remember thats why I ask questions What about a couple of smaller primes as opposed to one UWA? If buying a UWA what are the key features to consider?
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
    Tokina AF 28-70mm F/3.5-4.5
    Tokina AF AT-X 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6
    http://flickr.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kerala,India
    Posts
    334
    I was wondering wether wide angles like 10-20mm create vignetting at their wide end on mounting filters...there has been contrary opinions all over
    Nikon D40,
    Nikon TC 200
    Vivitar 28-80 AIS
    Nikon Micro 55mm AI 1977,
    Nikon 50mm f/1.8 E AIS 1979,
    Nikon 300mm f/4 ED IF AIS 1982.....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,161
    Hey ooverdrive i just did a quick scroll through your photos, LOVELY! India is such a vibrant colored country so many colors in everything, all so deep and rich, the buildings the clothing the land, it is almosy as if the air has color, or it could just be the humidity!
    Thanks for sharing, Pretty land, and good food !
    Sean
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
    Tokina AF 28-70mm F/3.5-4.5
    Tokina AF AT-X 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6
    http://flickr.com/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,421
    Quote Originally Posted by seanhoxx View Post
    IAs I understand it the main use of a UWA is in shooting buildings, bridges, other structures, wide landscapes? As that is among some of the least of my shooting a UWA will likely be among one of the last lenses I purchase. Unless of course the vet's in here can share some advice as to what else, and what other applications are the best for UWA?
    sean, never let anyone pigeon hole what you can and cant use a lens for. the use of any lens is purely up to the photographer and sometimes you can have the most fun by using a lens in things that are NOT what the consensus says is the "intended use.

    10-20mm: no buildings or landscapes here.




    a 300mm lens used at around a metre away as a "portrait lens"




    a 105 macro lens as a telephoto






    a standard 50mm "portrait lens" for wildlife



    how you use a lens is purely up to your imagination.
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Nice series of images Rooz.
    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    Red face UWA ... oh what can you do?

    UWA lenses offer an "instant" panorama. Well, kinda.

    The idea behind the lens is to provide the peripheral vision, which most lenses ... chop off. Theorectically, peripheral vision is your "warning" vision, where things do not normally register, but if there is movement ... it gets your attention.

    Close in, obviously, you can fit more people in your image, at the same instant. Just as obviously, if you want a long, balanced and super sharp appearance to your image, you would take several overlapped shots with a 50mm and stitch them together. It usually requires a very cooperative subject(s) and a bit more time and coordination. Time here, is the problem. Most people aren't inclined to give the photographer more than 30 seconds, if that. The UWA does not need more time, but you have inherent distortions, which are a product of the lens design, itself. Sometimes (more often than not) you can counter these distortions with software counter-distortion features, but that also has some cropping involved, so make sure you have some buffer room in the corners of your shots, usually the lower ones.

    Now I'm not discussing fisheye lenses, which have purposely accentuated the distortion of a wide lens and can offer some creative aspects to your images. The rectilinear lens is the type that offers the most "normal" look to it. But, the wider your go, below 16mm ... the more the distortion becomes apparent and has to be corrected for.

    One of the best and least corrected images I've taken was of the roof of the Cadet Chapel, at the US Air Force Academy. It was a 10mm shot, but since I used the inherent distortion of the lens in a way that aligned with the perspective of the shot, no post-processing correction was really needed. (Get to know your equipment)

    Here it is:

    Name:  USAFA-Chapel-roof-(1024-wide).jpg
Views: 139
Size:  463.7 KB

    Not too many lenses give you this. Now, a 17mm on a Full Frame sensor should render a close one, but not on an APS-C sensor ... you will need the 10mm.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 09-13-2008 at 07:26 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,161
    Thanks Rooz, I understand it's all about what you want and how you do it, and the value of thinking or should I say shooting outside the box. I guess maybe I should phrase my questions as what applications if any truely need or at least should be considered for UWA, also for some one new should they put the money towards a UWA or other glass to expand there options, pros and cons I guess.
    oh and Rooz what the hell critter is that with the 105mm macro??
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
    Tokina AF 28-70mm F/3.5-4.5
    Tokina AF AT-X 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6
    http://flickr.com/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,161
    Thanks also Don, I remember seeing that image when I first started stalking the forums trying to self educate, nice piece of work.
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
    Tokina AF 28-70mm F/3.5-4.5
    Tokina AF AT-X 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6
    http://flickr.com/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554
    Quote Originally Posted by seanhoxx View Post
    Thanks also Don, I remember seeing that image when I first started stalking the forums trying to self educate, nice piece of work.
    Thanks, I took it back in April and was pretty happy with it. The SIGMA UWA was so new it still had the "new lens smell" ... LOL

    BTW: I took the backyard shot with the UWA.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 09-13-2008 at 08:13 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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