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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    2,562

    What Precent of Your Images Are Keepers

    What percent of your images are keepers. I am finding that I am getting only a few real good images out of a days shots. I took about 50 shots of my friends humming birds the other day and didn't get many good shots. I tried using a tripod and shooting in manual focus. Then I tried using auto focus I just couldn't get that great shot. I was just wondering is it just me or does everybody have the same hit and miss problem.
    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,546

    Question Is it the journey ... or the destination?

    Frank,

    After taking several years of photography courses ... knowledge is true power when it comes to constructing a "keeper" shot. Oh sure, you will have your occasionally "lucky-shot" and be happy for those, but if you want to understand what the camera has to do to get what IT needs for a good image, you really need to understand the tool and its interaction.

    Taking "Photographic lighting", to me, was the single, most beneficial course I had experienced. First, it deprived me of all light ... and then through a series of steps upgraded me to a greater understanding of what light is and does in concert with ISO, aperture and, of course, action (shutter speed).

    Here's a sample of a single light source, not strobe.

    Name:  single-light-sword.jpg
Views: 97
Size:  298.8 KB

    Positioned so, it effectively lights JUST the subject, adds some drama and the "hot light" allow you to accurately "fashion" your image long before it gets to the camera. Unlike the kids seem to think, today, the camera should be the end of your creative focus and capture, not the beginning. But then again, there are all schools of thought on the process ... Photoshop (pixel manipulation) is your only hope.

    My recommendation, for everyone, is to seek out training in this regard and don't look for spectacular results, right off the bat ... but learn the true relationships in proper shot design and the settings in your camera. It's a fun experience, with frustrations and goofy shots along the way, but even your mistakes can be the greatest source of education you will ever have.

    Good luck, as always
    Last edited by DonSchap; 08-24-2008 at 12:02 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    Not including the 17 frame panorama, my last trip to the animal wildlife park was about 3% of my total pictures that I considered my "best" and uploaded to flickr. I took close to 800+ but I suspect a lot of it was just taking it for the hell of it and I was also on burst mode and would take two or three hoping to get 1 good one. If you aren't in continuous burst mode, I'd suggest maybe giving that a try to up your success rate.
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  4. #4
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    Feb 2006
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    Yeah, screw the educational part ... that would require an investment in time ... and we cannot have that.

    Like they tell the gangsters (and salesguys tell P&S shooters), "Pull that trigger and spray! You just gotsta hit sometin!" That's what separates the brain surgeons from the ditch diggers. Raw talent, right from the get-go.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 08-24-2008 at 05:20 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    Yeah, screw the educational part ... that would require an investment in time ... and we cannot have that.

    Like they tell the gangsters (and salesguys tell P&S shooters), "Pull that trigger and spray! You just gotsta hit sometin!" That's why separates the brain surgeons from the ditch diggers. Raw talent, right from the get-go.
    Hey, that's not fair! I was just giving Frank my input of what I noticed from my experience!
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    And all I am saying is that there comes a point in your use of the camera where some formal training can make you appreciate and truly understand what is happening inside the little "dark room", your photography in kind IMPROVES tenfold. It has a major payback ... but, it does require some FOCUS!

    We just all need to be fair ... and give the devil his due. That's it.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 08-24-2008 at 10:16 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    I do feel my shots have come a long way. I think like Dr4gon said it is easy to just take alot of shots and hope for the best, however I have been trying to take my time and watch the settings and histogram to help get the proper exposure. I think the most disappointing thing is the that I cannot seem to get proper focus. Everything else I can seem to control. A out of focus shot is something I cannot fix or adjust. I think I am going to do some more reading on focus. That is the part that I leave to the camera and hope for the best. I don't mind missing some shot but some shots you cannot afford to miss and I don't think I should be missing as many as I do. The humming birds I don't mind missing as much because of how hard they are to shoot. I am going to from now on try to make every shot count. I think we or should I just say I think because of the delete button you just snap away and hope for the best, but you cannot get that once in a lifetime shot back again
    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    Quote Originally Posted by sparkie1263 View Post
    I do feel my shots have come a long way. I think like Dr4gon said it is easy to just take alot of shots and hope for the best, however I have been trying to take my time and watch the settings and histogram to help get the proper exposure. I think the most disappointing thing is the that I cannot seem to get proper focus. Everything else I can seem to control. A out of focus shot is something I cannot fix or adjust. I think I am going to do some more reading on focus. That is the part that I leave to the camera and hope for the best. I don't mind missing some shot but some shots you cannot afford to miss and I don't think I should be missing as many as I do. The humming birds I don't mind missing as much because of how hard they are to shoot. I am going to from now on try to make every shot count. I think we or should I just say I think because of the delete button you just snap away and hope for the best, but you cannot get that once in a lifetime shot back again
    Frank
    I forgot to mention, I've read several books too . But clearly with digital, you can just snap away without thinking of how much it costs to develop the film. With your focus, I remember you said that ISO200 in one instance looked better than 100, it could just be that you aren't steadying your shot. In that case, burst might help so that maybe one will be more still and come out better than the rest. (I think don is ready to kill me now. )
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    Okay, I admit ... focus is hard to fight with these cameras. The 70-300mm lens response is kind of slow in that regard and that is precisely why the "snappier" high-speed zooms are what you need to combat it. Speed Kills! In other words, you get the killer shot!

    Now, we are talking serious money here ... the darn CZ 24-70mm f/2.8 ($1750) --- which is seriously hot (makes me sick), would probably instantly solve your issue, Frank. It rockets right to where you need it and you are free to fire away!

    Since you prefer the 70-200 or 70-300 lens, it seems rather apparent that either of the SONY pair would be the place to look ... the SONY 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G SSM ($799) or the SONY 70-200mm f/2.8 G SSM ($1799).

    The TAMRON 70-300mm f/4-5.6 just does not focus very fast. None of that class does ... except the SONY. It's been a real fight ... but, there is no denying some thing like this. It's just a fact.

    Again, the fastest performer ... at a reasonable cost, will be the Minolta AF 50mm f/1.7. Yes, it is a prime, but when you need a quick focus ... it'll turn it in.




    One other thing that I found quite helpful, especially manually focusing, aside from the focusing grid, was the addition of an eye piece corrector. (<- click here)

    But, hey, you want to talk about a frustrating shoot. With shooting through those darn John Hancock Center Observatory windows, I lost about 90% of everything I took ... to excessive diffusion and misfocus. By the end of the shoot, I was ready to kick the darn window out. Sheesh! Hundreds of lost images to malformed and dirty glass (they really should have, at the very least, washed the ones on the North-side prior to the Air Show, as they were inviting people to come up and enjoy the show from that vantage point. In a way, it was really disengenuous and bad business).
    Last edited by DonSchap; 08-24-2008 at 10:50 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    848
    around 70% of my shots
    Quote Originally Posted by Rooz View Post
    hands up who hates delobbo !!!!!!
    DeviantArt Gallery

    Flickr

    Canon 450D + Twin Kit Lens + 50mm 1.4
    It doesn't have to be awkward Will

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