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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    46

    Kodak EasyShare Z1012 IS?? been hearing bad stuff??

    so i've been hearing bad stuff bout the Kodak EasyShare Z1012. but i really like the sound the feature's of it. but i hear to much about the firmware and image prcessing time taking to long. so if somebody could help me out my giving the name of another one that has for the most part the same feature's?? like the 12x zoom and the wide angle shot's. and i want to use it for taking picture's of scenery and freestlye quad motorcross. but i want to keep it under $$$275$$$.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Lublin, Poland
    Posts
    261
    Many Kodak cameras, including Z1012, CANNOT be powered by AA alkaline batteries or Ni-MH rechargeables You can either use expensive lithium CRV3 batteries; KODAK Li-Ion Rechargeable KLIC-8000 (you will have to buy a charger for it) or AA lithium batteries, which are more expensive than alkalines. That is very limiting.

    Or you can make yourself a battery if you are into DIY
    http://www.dcresource.com/forums/sho...66&postcount=2

    Other nice cameras:

    Canon S5 IS (12x zoom with stabiliser, manual controls and rotating LCD, but no real wide angle at 36mm and no RAW mode)

    Fujifilm S6500fd (aka S6000fd - now discontinued, 10x manually-operated zoom without stabiliser, manual controls, RAW mode, 28mm wide angle, respectable higher ISO performance)

    Fujifilm S9600 (aka S9100 - same as above + more megapixels, command dial, hinged LCD and flash hot-shoe)
    Last edited by S_p_i_d_e_r; 08-21-2008 at 04:38 AM.
    Cheers,
    Jacek
    _____________________________________________
    Current photo gear: PENTAX MZ-S/BG-10, AF-360FGZ, FA 50/1.4, FA 28-70/4, Sigma 28-70/2.8 EX DF; Panasonic DMC-TZ5E-K
    Previous gear: Ricoh AF 500 -> Samsung AF Zoom 1050 (still got that one) -> Zenit E -> Ricoh KR-10 Super -> Ricoh XR-X

    I have LBA and CBA for Pentax models not even announced!

    In all the world none can compare to this tiny weaver
    His deadly cloth so silky and fair

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    814

    How's about this baby?

    This would be my choice; the only thing it doesn't have is RAW, but it's got IS, has a 28mm wide end, and an 18x zoom tele. At its 2MP resolution (which will give you perfect 6" x 4" prints) it can shoot at 15 frames/second. It also has very limited shutter lag for its class.

    Fuji S8000fd

    It's selling for around $300 maybe, but could be cheaper online.

    Cheers

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Lublin, Poland
    Posts
    261
    Even at ISO100 Canon S5 IS wins with Fuji S8000fd in terms of picture sharpness and colour rendition. Even at ISO400 images from Canon look cleaner and more detailed, although both cameras suffer heavily from digital noise.

    http://www.imaging-resource.com/IMCOMP/COMPS01.HTM
    Cheers,
    Jacek
    _____________________________________________
    Current photo gear: PENTAX MZ-S/BG-10, AF-360FGZ, FA 50/1.4, FA 28-70/4, Sigma 28-70/2.8 EX DF; Panasonic DMC-TZ5E-K
    Previous gear: Ricoh AF 500 -> Samsung AF Zoom 1050 (still got that one) -> Zenit E -> Ricoh KR-10 Super -> Ricoh XR-X

    I have LBA and CBA for Pentax models not even announced!

    In all the world none can compare to this tiny weaver
    His deadly cloth so silky and fair

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    46

    k

    then what about the Fujifilm S1000FD??? cause it is a-lot cheaper!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    158
    Quote Originally Posted by trailrider894 View Post
    then what about the Fujifilm S1000FD??? cause it is a-lot cheaper!!
    Well do you want one that does what you need, or one that is super cheap?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    western US
    Posts
    1,218
    I prefer how the controls handle on the Fuji S1000fd to the Kodak. However, it does lack the optical IS feature, if that happens to be a deal breaker for you. For your motocross action I don't think optical IS would be any benefit. I should confess to bias, my own camera is a Fuji, though not the S1000.

    Kelly Cook

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    46

    so

    so you are saying that it would be okay to get that one?? by your opion?? and what exactyl is optical IS???

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,173
    Quote Originally Posted by trailrider894 View Post
    and what exactyl is optical IS???
    Optical IS (image stabilization) are sensors and motors that move the CCD around to counteract the movement of the camera from your unsteady hands. People can't hold a camera still for very long, and your subject will be blurry if the camera moves while the shutter is open.

    This is great for when you subject is still. If you need to keep the shutter open for 1/20th of a second to get enough light, with IS you can do this hand held. Without IS you might need to use a tripod.

    When your subject is moving (like in motocross) IS doesn't do you much good. It allows you to keep the camera still while the shutter is open, but your subject will move the same amount whether you have IS or not. The bikes will still be a blur across the image.

    For fast moving objects you need a fast shutter speed. In good light all cameras will be fine with that. In low light you need to push the ISO higher.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    814

    Optical Image Stabilisation - OIS

    Optical image stabilisation means that any potential camera shake or vibration caused by the user is lessened, so that your images hopefully turn out sharper at lower shutter speeds and lower ISOs.

    OIS can be implemented in two distinct ways: Firstly by physically shifting one of the glass elements in the lens itself. Secondly by shifting the sensor inside the camera body. Different manufacturers have different preferences, and for purely point 'n' shoot cameras it doesn't really matter which method is used. With dSLRs though, it's brand-specific, as some camera manufacturers' lenses are stabilised, whilst other's lenses are not, but their sensors are.

    All methods of OIS utilise tiny gyroscopes (electro-mechanical devices) to sense any vertical and/or horizontal movement of the camera body, and instantly shift the lens element or sensor accordingly to counteract this involuntary movement. You can usually gain (depending on the manufacturer's marketing department!) 2 or 3 stops at least.

    So-called "dual image stabilisation" is verging on marketing hype IMHO it simply means as well as OIS, the camera raises the ISO, or the shutter speed or both. Remember though that anything that automatically raises your ISOs also raises the noise in your images as a tradeoff. High ISOs and shutter speeds do however help eliminate subject blur, whereas OIS can't.

    Personally, as it's now commonly accepted camera technology, I wouldn't buy a camera without OIS. Any camera manufacturer who excludes it from a current-model camera in 2008 is simply cutting corners to save money IMHO. I've owned four cameras without OIS, and now own a couple with it, and I know which I prefer.

    Cheers

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