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  1. #91
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    There is no reason you cannot take your camera with you and evaluate a "used" or new lens. That really is the only way to be sure and, also, it is the only real way you can see what you can do with it.

    There are a few wide-angle shots on here, but until you can witness the aspect change as you look through the lens, no one can adequately describe it.

    Welcome to the forum, 'Thriller' ... enjoy and read what you can. Lots of good inside info, here.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 03-02-2009 at 06:55 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  2. #92
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA.
    Posts
    1,161
    isn't Henry's the big name in Canada for new and used equip. maybe check them out. Pawn shops can be a deal if you know what your looking for and know how to tell what if anything is wrong with the item. There will be no gurantee at a pawn shop. a large well established one may have a 3 or 5 day return for trade only NO cash back. it is less likely today to get stolen goods out of a "respected' established pawn shop but if you do as long as they followed the requirements, even if they took a fake name and address off a fake ID YOU are out the cash and the item. Pawn shops will often get 'legit' dumps of counterfit or bootleg merch brought in, depends if the clerk knows enough or cares enough to check it out. But deals can be had, take your camera awith card in and try lenses out.
    Sony A700_____________Minolta AF 50mm. F/1.7
    Minolta AF 70-210mm F/3.5-4.5 Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR DiII LD Asp. [IF]
    Tamron SP AF 70-200mm. F/2.8 DI LD [IF] Macro
    Tamron AF 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di LD Macro 1:2
    Tokina AF 28-70mm F/3.5-4.5
    Tokina AF AT-X 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6
    http://flickr.com/

  3. #93
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Quote Originally Posted by laydros View Post
    ........ There is a downside to older lenses (pre-digital) because they don't have the coatings that are beneficial to digital.....
    Can we lay this commonly held misconception to rest, it's "Marketing Speak".

    A coating is there to cut down on unwanted reflections. The coating sits quietly on the various lens' surfaces doing the job it was designed for and, once the stray light is eliminated (I wish), it matters not a jot whether the remaining light falls on film or on a digital sensor.

    That's not to say that all coatings are the same. Minolta pioneered coating technology and had a program in place which saw continuous improvements over the years, so don't expect a lens from 1970 to be as good coating wise as a lens from the 90's

    There are issues like the "centre spot" caused by a reflection of the aperture back to the sensor. Because the digital sensor causes a more specular reflection than is caused by film, this can be more of a problem but is a digital design issue and unrelated to lens coating.

    There are other more compelling reasons for a "digital" lens relating to the wide angle issue, increased resolution, less chromatic aberration, retrofocus (telecentric) design but none of these relate to COATINGS.
    Last edited by Peekayoh; 03-03-2009 at 04:46 AM. Reason: afterthoght

  4. #94
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Quote Originally Posted by Thriller View Post
    ........Would it be wise to buy used or should I break open the wallet and buy new?
    any advice would be appreciated!
    There is no single answer to this question. You may be better served by asking about a specific lens (or specific range) rather than in general and you also need to be clear on how much money you want to spend.
    I've got plenty of "old glass" collected over the years and I swear by it, even if I do get a bit of stick (good humoured) from some quarters.

  5. #95
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    788
    Quote Originally Posted by Peekayoh View Post
    There are other more compelling reasons for a "digital" lens relating to the wide angle issue, increased resolution, less chromatic aberration, retrofocus (telecentric) design but none of these relate to COATINGS.
    I was under the impression that the coatings helped with the ghosting/glare bit as well as CA. I guess the CA is more with the glass shape? Aspherical and stuff?

    What does telecentric mean? Rear focusing?
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    The coatings mostly deal the reflections and scattering occurring at the glass/air interface. When the Sun is in the frame, the direct light is bounced around inside the lens creating the Aperture shaped Ghosts and contrast reducing flare.

    CA is a separate issue when different colors to come to focus at different places on the imager (You've seen Prismatic diffraction at work). The color fringing is brighter and clearer than it would be on a film camera with the same lens.

    Much was made of the retrofocus, telecentric design of the four thirds format. If you picture the light leaving the lens exit pupil and hitting the centre of the sensor you can see that the orientation will be perpendicular to the surface. As you move towards the edge of the sensor the orientation will be at an increasing angle to the vertical. Whilst this angle is of no consequence to film, the Digital Sensor is more selective and light diverging just 15 degrees can cause up to a 50% loss in sensitivity. The angle is affected by the distance from the lens exit pupil to the sensor (retrofocus) and more distance is better so telefocus lenses suffer less in this regard compared to wide angles.
    It is clear that a smaller 2x crop sensor will suffer less from this problem than a 1.5x crop or full frame sensor unless, of course, you make the lens smaller as in the 4/3 system. In this case it was necessary to increase the relative distance of the exit pupil away from the sensor to decrease the angle (telecentric).
    Last edited by Peekayoh; 03-03-2009 at 08:52 AM. Reason: duplication

  7. #97
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Lightbulb Old glass, new glass

    Quote Originally Posted by Thriller View Post
    Would it be wise to buy used or should I break open the wallet and buy new?
    any advice would be appreciated!
    Used lenses have one issue that leaves them a little questionable in your work ... someone else used it. Obviously, the older the lens, the likelier the chance it was bounced around a little more. Many older lenses were built heavier and more solidly. They lend themselves better to such treatment, but then there are those that do not and suffer enormously. I recently got one such lens, - USED - from a large retailer that advertises on this forum ... and wound up having to sell it back to SONY for a partial refund. SONY no longer had the parts support for such a lens and made amends, but that kind of thing will not last much longer, as this show gets down the road.

    Buying USED is a true gamble. Some will get lucky ... others will get tricked, and it will not necessarily be by a single individual sale. Even buying new, I have found lenses, fresh out-of-the-box, effectively unusable because the lens' focus is off to such a degree, I can not compensate for it. At least with a NEW lens, the manufacturer is totally responsible for delivering a "properly working" lens ... and since the lens' whole mission in life is a sharp, clear focus ... YOU WIN when you send it back for "adjustment." Requesting that of a used lens, usually means ... you lose, having to pay for the adjustment yourself. This can range in costs from $80 to $200. That can be a serious budget strangler, if you are trying to launch your photography.

    Anyway ... just some aspects you may want to consider ... before buying USED.

    Flip a coin, first.

    Name:  coin-flip.jpg
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Size:  66.5 KB

    See what the odds say.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 03-18-2009 at 06:59 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  8. #98
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Exclamation Use those cameras!

    I have noticed we are not seeing much in the way of postings from our newer members.

    Come on, folks ... it's Spring! Things worth a look are all over the place. Grab that new DSLR camera and start getting something to look at. Don't let your investment collect dust. The "film" is cheap enough!

    We're on the other side of Winter, up here, north of the Equator. See a cool flower, snap it. Mailman biting your dog? Snap it! That's news! Noisy bird! Fire away! It is time for Australia to sample the snow!

    Then ... to prove you are at least trying ... post it. Show us what we are missing at your end of the network. With a combined effort on POTD (Picture of the Day) .... nothing's safe!
    Last edited by DonSchap; 03-26-2009 at 07:03 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #99
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    602

    Red face A900

    I just got the A900. Went straight from a fixed lens (no stabilization) to the A900 after looking at the Nikon D700 and Canon EOS 5d-MarkII.

    My hobby is photographing old courthouses and architectural details of old buildings. So, I'm faced with a lot of low light situations and can't always set up a tripod. I was tired of having to judge the image I wanted to capture versus the image that could be printed and the high noise levels my fixed lens camera was giving at even low ISO settings.

    Since I was starting from scratch without any lenses, I was free to choose between Sony, Nikon or Canon. After several months of looking and comparing, I opted for the A900. I've been very happy with the choice, but am still getting used to the camera and its various settings.

    Now, to the issues I've experienced with the A900. When shooting in shaded areas, I sometimes get a bluish tint on grey concrete buildings. It's annoying. . I think it has to do with the white balance setting and I'm still trying to figure it out .

  10. #100
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Great choice in camera. You can fix the WB in PS. If you shoot in Raw you will have more control. I am not the best person to advise you on this but you will get some good advice here.
    Welcome to the forum

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

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