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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    246

    Nikon D60 lens AF compatibility?

    I'm researching cameras (point & shoot - have a few models (including a couple as-yet-unannounced ones) in mind, as well as a couple dSLRs, from which I need to choose one to replace my previous camera), and so far I've been disqualifying the Nikon D60 due to its lack of a built-in focus motor.
    However, I may consider re-adding it to the list of contenders, due to its live view (even though it doesn't have a fully-articulating (rotating) LCD display (like the Olympus E-3) and not-too-bad ISO 3200 capability.

    I know that Nikkor AF-S lenses support autofocus on the D60, but if I'm looking at lenses from other manufacturers, like Quantaray, Sigma, Tamron, Tokina, etc, how would I know that a particular lens supports AF on the D60?

    Basically, I'm looking at
    A: ~50+mm (35mm equivalent (this is the only one for which I'll list the 35mm equivalent - all others are actual (approximate) focal lengths)) F/2 or faster prime,
    B: 18-50mm F/2.8 (or similar),
    C: either a stabilized 18-125mm F/3.5-5.6 or 18-200mm F/3.5-6.3, or a ~50-150mm stabilized F/3.5-5.6 or so, or unstabilized F/2.8 (at wide - tele can be a little slower like F/3.5 or F/4), and (later, when I have the $),
    D: Sigma 150-500mm F/5-6.3 OS (unless Nikon (or Canon, another manufacturer I'm considering), comes out with a body with built-in VR/IS, in which case I'd get the 50-500mm Sigma & skip the 50-150 lens), and
    E: ~10-20mm ultrawide

    So... if I'm considering the Nikon D60 and want autofocus on any lens I buy, what do I need to look for from the 3rd-party manufacturers?

    (Also, how long do I need to wait till a decent-quality 3rd-party mfgr (Sigma, for example) comes out with, say, a stabilized 18-200mm lens that's at least F/2.8 through 50mm, for under $700-800?

    Or... given a particular "slow" stabilized zoom lens, what would be the price difference for a non-stabilized zoom lens with the same focal length such that the maximum aperture is as much faster as the IS/VR/OS/OIS/VC/etc corrects for? (for example, a 70-300mm F/3.5-5.6 2-stop IS, vs a 70-300mm F/1.8-2.8 w/o IS.) IMO, if they were the same price (or no more than, say, 10-15% difference), I'd go for the faster non-IS lens. Something tells me it's not like that, though. )

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Brisbane, CA
    Posts
    3,591
    Quote Originally Posted by pianoplayer88key View Post
    Or... given a particular "slow" stabilized zoom lens, what would be the price difference for a non-stabilized zoom lens with the same focal length such that the maximum aperture is as much faster as the IS/VR/OS/OIS/VC/etc corrects for? (for example, a 70-300mm F/3.5-5.6 2-stop IS, vs a 70-300mm F/1.8-2.8 w/o IS.) IMO, if they were the same price (or no more than, say, 10-15% difference), I'd go for the faster non-IS lens. Something tells me it's not like that, though. )
    Don't both lenses have to exist for this question to be answered? Seems that way to me.

    I find it hard to believe someone who spends as much time researching cameras and coming up with ridiculous demands doesn't doesn't know the answer to the D60 question. Just in case someone who's actually interested in buying a camera reads this...AF-S = HSM for Sigma.

    Ok, so what happens first...
    A) Piano Man buys a camera.
    B) A 70-300mm F/1.8-2.8 is released AND it only costs 15% more than a 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS

    I think I'm going with B. It might take 100 years, but I'd still take B.
    Lukas

    Camera: Anonymous
    I could tell you but I wouldn't want you to get all pissy if it's the wrong brand

    Flickr

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    246
    Ok... so the HSM sigmas support AF on the Nikon, that's what you're saying?

    What about the Tamron and Tokina lenses?

    Also, I saw the announcement for the micro 4/3 system.... that might delay my purchase of an SLR (and instead have me opt for an all-in-one, like a Canon S6 IS (that's not a typo), Fuji S100fs or S200fs, Panasonic FZ28, Olympus SP-570 or SP-580, or something like that).

    Another thing I'd like to see... we've had interchangeable lenses for a long time on cameras... I'd like to see interchangeable sensors (without having to change the body). For example, switch from a 11mp 2/3" Fuji SuperCCD sensor with a 50-500mm F/4-6.3 Sigma lens for ultra-tele work to a Nikon 12mp FX (FF 35mm) sensor with a 50mm F/1.4 for indoor low-light photography. Is it possible we might have this in the next 2-3 years? (No, I'm not waiting for that feature before I buy a camera.) And, digital camera backs don't count. I'm hoping for something that doesn't add more than 20%, plus the cost of the CCD/CMOS, to the cost of a similarly-specced non-interchangeable-sensor SLR.)

    Another thing on a more reasonable/practical note... I recently came across something in a dpreview article from a few years ago on the 4/3 system when it was first announced... there was something about Fuji possibly showing interest.
    I'd like to see a Fuji 4/3" SuperCCD sensor in a micro 4/3 camera. Judging by their smaller sensor ISO capabilities (F31fd, S100fs) they should have, IMO, at least a 1-2 stop advantage over the current 4/3" sensors for image noise & detail at high ISOs.
    Last edited by pianoplayer88key; 08-05-2008 at 03:29 AM.

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