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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Why is it not sharp right from the camera?

    Why is it not sharp right from the camera? I have to use contrast adjustment to get it sharp.

    Sony A77
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    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  2. #2
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    I have often wondered that, myself ... so help me God, it's in the glass.

    After shooting through the Zeiss 135mm f/1.8 ... it just doesn't need that kind of adjustment. I know it is maddening, but it's true.

    I cannot compare the 17-50mm to it, but I can the 70-300, set at 135mm and shoot identical images. The CZ will lay to waste anything the TAMRON can even hope do, on a good day! Of course, there is a significant price difference here ... but, that's what you get. Kick-rump images. Right out of the camera. No PP at all! There are darn few images that I have had to adjust, off the CF card. It shifts your photography to a whole new and refreshing level.

    Of course, if you shoot it wrong ... it's still wrong. But, if you shoot it right ... you're pretty much done! Sharpening ... a true waste of time.

    I know that is not satisfying to consider, on a reasonable budget, or what you had hoped to know, but the truth isn't always the news you want to hear, it just is what it is. Once you use a lens of this caliber, it is like finding religion. It makes your "standard" image taking EASY.

    A wise man will not shoot this lens ... because it devilishly shifts your paradigm in expectations. What you believed was tolerable, no longer is.

    To answer the question ... it's not sharp out of the camera ... because it wasn't sharp when it got to the sensor. The optics did their magic ... and came up shy.

    Here's a side-by-side, at 100% The sharper focus is apparent. That's what is missing.

    Name:  Compare at 100 percent.jpg
Views: 129
Size:  334.9 KB
    Both images were taken with the A100 at exactly the same settings. No alteration ... just a clean crop.

    Photography ... a ongoing journey, eh?
    Last edited by DonSchap; 07-24-2008 at 08:53 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    This is my Tamaron 70-300. I do get super sharp images on some shots. I will look and post another that is good.



    I did bump the sharpness in the camera up one notch. Should I try to mess with the contrast also?

    One other question on a different topic. How come sometimes the camera does not lock on focus and I cannot snap the picture?
    Last edited by sparkie1263; 07-24-2008 at 08:16 PM.
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  4. #4
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    Frank, it is a "built-in" safety with using "AF". You ought to try doing it indoors, with a 70-300mm ... no flash. It'll be cruising back and forth, and probably never acheive focus lock ... unless you find a high contrast point of light, hence the use of "modeling lamps."

    ANYWAY: If you go to "MF" ... it WILL trip the shutter, no matter how bad the focus is.

    "MF" is kind of like the "trump" setting in the camera. Like saying, "You will do it ... and like it, too!"
    Last edited by DonSchap; 07-24-2008 at 08:55 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    2,204
    Were you on spot focus? It's not a bad picture, just a bit dark (I'm assuming it was a nice sunny day at the beach).
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    dr4gon is right, though ... the image is a full f-stop underexposed.

    This is where "Spot-metering" excels ... because, it will narrow the exposure meter reading to the center of the frame, instead of "Multi segment" or "Center-weighted" measurement.

    On the A100: If you turn the right "function" knob clockwise, to the limit, that is metering mode selection. Give it shot ... and see if it improves the exposure for you.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 07-24-2008 at 09:29 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Maybe I was using the wrong word when I said sharp. I think what I meant was not clear. If you take the image of my granddaughter and use auto contrast it will clear right up. If you take the image of the dove and use auto contrast there is little to no difference in the image.
    Thanks Frank

    P.S. I do see a big difference in the glass.
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    4,173
    Quote Originally Posted by sparkie1263 View Post
    Maybe I was using the wrong word when I said sharp. I think what I meant was not clear.
    No, what you meant was underexposed.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    So I should not use spot meter or is it better to be underexposed? What is the best metering mode to use?
    Thanks everybody for your detailed explanation.
    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    Frank,

    In my experience, when you are shooting subjects to be in the center of the image ... SPOT metering. Obviously you want to get the best exposure for faces that you can, fighting shadows and what not. Always try to meter for the shadows, not the highlight. In the first posted shot, I would have tried to meter for her forehead, on her right side.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 07-25-2008 at 02:30 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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