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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204

    help with the moon

    not sure if this is the right place, but the sony people are the best!

    so while we are a few days out from a full moon and craters will be visible at the edges in the coming days, I want to see if I can improve my moon shots.

    I did a bit of unsharp mask on photoshop and it seemed to help, but almost seemed to fake a lot of craters on the moon. so here is the original picture just saved as a jpeg from the original RAW. (click for the original).



    exif:
    a300
    f/16
    1/160 sec exposure
    iso 400
    300mm (tamron 70-300mm)

    Thanks.
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,406
    you will only get so much sharpness out of that lens. i would suggest you use iso100 and wind back to f8 tops. there is no ned to shoot at f16 and by that aperture your lens will well and truly be suffering from diffraction.
    D800e l V1 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l EP5 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    I have various other shots from tonight, but this one seemed the best. With iso100 and an aperture of f8, what exposure would you recommend? How long at 300mm would it start to blur because of the earth's rotation?

    thanks for the fast response
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,406
    exposure will depend on the phase of the moon so tough to predict. you're on the right track though. around 1/250s maybe right. take a few at different shutter speeds and pick the best.
    D800e l V1 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l EP5 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    alright, thanks for the pointers!
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,545
    Look, you have the luxury of using a digital (no wasted film):
    1. Set to Manual Mode
    2. Fix your aperture to f/8
    3. Set ISO to either 100 or 200
    4. Initially go with no DRO compensation. (You can add it back in later, if so desired)
    5. run a complete round of images from 1/125 thru 1/500. In fact, do it several times
    6. examine each shot for what you want out of it.
    7. If your have the α300 mounted on a tripod, shut off "Super SteadyShot" ... it can generate false shake compensation, when it has no real inertia feedback to fight, making the sensor move when it simply does not need to.
    8. "Image shake" is your worst enemy, with this kind of shot. Any movement of the camera will degrade your image. If you can get a wired release (SONY part # RM-S1AM), do so ...

      Name:  RM-S1AM.jpg
Views: 107
Size:  32.7 KB

      it also limits shake to the camera from you physically touching the camera's shutter release button. (I feel these particular releases are so important, I carry one with both the α100 & the α700).
    9. If you still have keen eyes, you could to "MF" mode and manually focus for a sharper image.


    These can help provide for a sharper shot.

    If you are still dissatisfied after all of that ... time to investigate some higher end glass for the front of that camera. The one pictured below may be about the best available for the SONY, at 400mm, other than ridin' the back of a telescope. At 400mm, the moon will be about 1/6th the width of your sensor. As you can see in your own shot at 300mm, it is only about 1/9th.

    Minolta AF 400mm f/5.6 APO G
    Name:  Minolta AF 400mm f45 HS APO G.jpg
Views: 127
Size:  72.6 KB

    To really zero in on that bad boy ... you need 800mm on an APS-C sensor. That will, more than like, fill the sensor from top to bottom. The 400mm f/5.6 w/ a 2x Teleconverter might be just the ticket.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 06-14-2008 at 09:46 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    yeah I would love to have a lens like that .

    These were taken on Manual mode with most of the things you said. I don't remember if this one had DRO off. SSS should have been off too, at least for most of my shots I will try again tonight at f/8! I was also using a remote shutter release (I think I read there's no mirror lockup feature on the a300? to help reduce movement).

    What should my metering mode, autofocus mode, and AF area mode be on?

    And yeah I wish I could use MF, but the difference between infinite focus and where it needs to be is ever so slight that it's hard to set it, so auto focus it is!
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,545
    Use spot focus ... with AF Area.

    Metering is unimportant, with the manual settings chosen. With this series of shots (take a lot), you will be manually evaluating your exposures ... not too concerned with getting what the "camera thinks" is right. You are literally shooting into your apparent light source.

    By the weigh ... (little joke there) ... the AF 400mm f/5.6 is one of the heaviest lenses (4.2 lbs) Minolta ever made. Admittedly, the MF 200-500mm f/6.9 I use weighes in at 6 lbs ... but I have to agree, you need to rest this lens on something to get a steady shot. Without a tripod, you would be hurting using it. Backache galore and some very shaky images, to boot.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 06-15-2008 at 10:40 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    lol I can imagine, It'd be like holding a brick to your face trying to steady it, not to mention the outrageous zoom to pickup the shake!
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,545
    A long lens of this quality usually is in the professional's bag, rarely the hobbiest's. Last I heard, this lens listed at $2000.

    SONY is supposedly coming out with something similar and it's anyone's guess what kind of abhorrent price tag they are going to stick on it.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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