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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    6

    Taking pictures from a moving car

    What is the best way of taking pictures from a moving car.

    There are several problems...

    1) a window (at least some of the time)
    2) the speed of the vehicle
    3) moving distance between camera and object.

    I am new to photography but cant find anything about this anywhere.

    Is it ebst to set camera to auto (I have a Fuji8100 ) or should I do it manually. I guess a fast shutter speed would be necessary, but how fast?

    Any tips welcome
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    2,132
    If you are after the wheel and background blur then you don't want a super fast shutter. Try between 1/60 and 1/200.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,173
    Quote Originally Posted by Visual Reality View Post
    If you are after the wheel and background blur then you don't want a super fast shutter. Try between 1/60 and 1/200.
    He's taking a picture from a moving car, not of one. It really depends on what's in the foreground. Fast shutter speed doesn't matter too much if you are far away from your subject, although a fast shutter will help reduce vibrations from the car.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    811
    No problem shooting objects in front of the car as they approach. Taking from the side is a different matter. Center your subject while its still in front then pan with the subject until its beside you and click the shutter, while continuing to pan with the subject. You should get a sharp image with 'moving' background. It takes a bit of practice, but easy to get onto. And use the fastest shutter speed you can.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    6

    Aha

    Bynx - that is exactly what I was trying to do.
    Going on holiday soon and travelling through France where there are some great roadside shots to be had (went same place last year, in case you were wondering!).
    But only get one chance to take the pic.

    Just one thing - what is deemed to be fast? My camera takes 4 secs to 1/2000.
    Is something like 1/250 what I would need??

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    811
    The faster the shutter speed the sharper the edges of the object you are shooting. The faster shutter speed will kill your camera shake as well as your panning motion. If the light available will let you shoot at 1/2000 got for it. Otherwise shoot as fast as you are able.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Livin in a redneck paradise
    Posts
    1,872
    Bynx said what I would have said. I'll add this: clean your windows frequently, it doesn't take very many exploded bugs to ruin your pictures.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    108
    Have you try panning!
    I was born and brought up in Iran, a beautiful country full of history. I started taking photos at an early age (15 years old) of my life with a Lubitel, a Russian twin lenses camera.

    k o m b i z z

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Dubai, UAE
    Posts
    2,906
    not to hijack the thread but what about reflections on the window that shows in the image
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Just far enough from London to be in the countryside
    Posts
    123
    I use a beanbag over an open window to rest the camera on, and never take images in the foreground at slower than 1/100s. However
    ALWAYS SECURE THE CAMERA TO THE CAR- you don't want to lose it going over a bump in the road.

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