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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    +38 50' 29.20", -77 18' 29.44"
    Posts
    8

    Please Help Out A Noob

    Hello folks,
    New poster here & hoping to bebefit from the wealth of knowledge here.
    I have had a Canon S1 IS for a couple years now & mostly have used it to take snapshots or people, outdoor events, etc.
    Recently I decided I wanted to expand my photo taking skills and began with actually reading the instruction manual & a digital camera book I picked up at the library. I have been focusing on Outdoor photography shot while I am camping or hiking and the problem I am having is lack of sharpness in the pictures.
    For example I took some closeup pictures of wildflowers by standing over them & using the zoom to frame the shot but it turns out fuzzy on occasion the camera has trouble focusing but I just focus on my foot swing it forward to the flower & snap the photo. Recently this past trip I tried leaving the shutter open while shooting a waterfall & the "cotton candy" effect plain did not happen (shooting from a gorillapod). Attempting shots of the night sky resulted in black with a few white dots.
    I realise I am covering a gambit of situations here, my main frustration currently is the fuzzy photo.
    I'm curious if this camera just isn't enough to accomplish what I'm looking for or if I need to just work on my knowledge & skills.
    If it will be helpful I can post some of the shots I am unhappy with as I assume people can gain information from the file.

    Thanks in advance for any assistance

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,173
    Were you in macro mode when taking pictures of the flowers? The best way to take close ups is to put the camera in Macro mode (the little flower icon) then zoom all the way out. Your lens can't focus that close to the camera when zoomed in.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    811
    For macro shots you might try adding a #3 close-up filter/lens if the front of your lens is threaded. This enables you to get closer. The drawback is your depth of field is narrower. For most situations I suggest you go to manual focus.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    814

    Any IQ loss or CA?

    I'm interested in your response too Bynx....

    I'm not familiar with the close-up lenses, and found them here at Adorama.com.

    I understand the basics of how they work, but I'm not familiar with the use of the term dioptre as #1 or #2 and #4 but assume it's the amount of magnification. Could you explain this for us? Thanks.

    Also, they seem very cheap for what they do. Or are they a "toy"?

    Cheers

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    +38 50' 29.20", -77 18' 29.44"
    Posts
    8
    Unfortunately the S1 does not have a Macro mode. My lend front is not threaded but I can purchase an adapter and lens.

    So I am to understand that rather than zoom into my macro shots I should maybe squat down to get closer leaving the lens wide?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,173
    I didn't know that about the S1. Here are the specs:
    The PowerShot S1 is somewhat unique, in that it doesn't have a macro mode that you can turn on and off. Even so, you can still take closeup shots, with a minimum distance to the subject of 10 cm at wide-angle, and 93 cm at telephoto.
    So, if you want to shoot at full zoom you need to be almost a meter away from the subject. If you go to full wide angle you can be as close as 10 cm.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    811
    If there is an adapter that will allow you to add (screw on) close-up filters that would be a definite plus. The filters I have are numbered 1, 2 and 3. I bought these many many years ago (probably from Matthew Brady). I made the mistake of buying a #3 instead of a #4. The larger the number the greater the distance from the subject. When you add the filters the larger numbers go on first then in decreasing numerical order. Such as #3, #2, #1, or #2, #1, or 3, #1. A #2 and#1 is the same as #3. As you add them together the distance to the subject decreases and the depth of field gets less. With all three filters added the depth of field is virtually a flat place. Its great for shooting flat subjects such as stamps. These filters, while inexpensive are definately not toys and should be in anyones camera bag who ever wants to do macro. One big advantage with these and a Fuji S700 is that you can achieve the same closeness as Super Macro while still having use of the built in flash. If you check out the Fuji thread S700 section there is a website that was just put on there concerning all info about filters. I hope you can sift through my babbling and understand how important close up filters are.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Brisbane, CA
    Posts
    3,591
    Quote Originally Posted by Gucca View Post
    Recently this past trip I tried leaving the shutter open while shooting a waterfall & the "cotton candy" effect plain did not happen (shooting from a gorillapod). Attempting shots of the night sky resulted in black with a few white dots.
    Milky waterfall - You can't just leave the shutter open longer. You need to make sure that shutter speed is part of a correct exposure. Without filters you'd probably need an overcast day or a waterfall that is in the shade. Also, use the timer when using the Gorillapod as the camera still shakes after you hit the shutter release button.

    Night Sky - You probably can't do this with your camera because you are limited by a 15 second SS (at least the S3 is). If you want to take night pictures it would probably be best to shoot city lights or limit yourself to shooting before the sky turns completely black.

    Here are a couple of examples, both taken with the S3 and a Gorillapod. The first is take a short time after sunset. The second is taken after the sun had been down for awhile. I don't have any milky water shots from this camera but it should be possible in the right situation.
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Last edited by TheWengler; 05-07-2008 at 11:23 AM.
    Lukas

    Camera: Anonymous
    I could tell you but I wouldn't want you to get all pissy if it's the wrong brand

    Flickr

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    +38 50' 29.20", -77 18' 29.44"
    Posts
    8
    Thanks for all the input!
    To combat shake from depressing the shutter button I used the self-timer
    I guess I need to just practise a bit & see what I can do. Is there an oppropriate area of the forum to post photos for critique?
    I'd really like to learn & maybe take photos like TheWengler, wow... nice job man.
    Also I think the S1 keep the shutter open for 30 seconds if that makes a difference. I did notice on the waterfall if I left the shutter open longer than 1/50 (I think) I got really washed out.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Brisbane, CA
    Posts
    3,591
    You can put it in the Photo Gallery section.
    Lukas

    Camera: Anonymous
    I could tell you but I wouldn't want you to get all pissy if it's the wrong brand

    Flickr

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