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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    Go with the kit lens, then. It should be plenty. Effectively a 28-105mm lens.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr® & Sdi

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    The lens you don't like. LOL
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    Look ... if your buying a new lens, we're talking a different story. You are the photographer and if the "kit" works for you ... use it.

    Personally, I didn't like the "kit" right out of the box. I shot a series of test shots with it ... and was severely disappointed, because, Frank, I knew what I could get with the TAMRON SP AF 17-50mm f/2.8 XR DiII LD Aspherical (IF) lens. I had used it for 12-months with the Canon EOS 20D ... and it was terrific. I wanted that kind of result out of my SONY ... so I immediately scrapped the 18-70 ... and bought the SONY-mount version of the TAMRON. I got my shot back ... case closed.

    If you opt to buy the TAMRON lens for the wedding, your results will definitely take a turn for the better. It's a great lens on the SONY and one I carry all the time.

    Others subscribe to the purchase of the SONY Carl Zeiss® Vario-Sonnar T DT 16-80mm f/3.5-4.5, but you will pay dearly for this lens. I'm about getting a good shot for a fair price. Should the economy take a turn upward ... then I might get elaborate.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 04-29-2008 at 05:22 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr® & Sdi

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Don what made you switch from Canon to Sony?? I don't have any high end lenes right now. I am just starting to get back into photography. I have alot to learn. I try not to learn by trial and error anymore. I do alot of research and ask alot of questions as you can see. I thank you and everybody else for answering my questions. Someday I hope to return the favor.
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Red face It's a long story ...

    Quote Originally Posted by sparkie1263 View Post
    Don what made you switch from Canon to Sony??
    Initially and for twenty years, I have been shooting Minolta cameras. I still have many of them ... the Maxxum 7000 (1985) and four Maxxum 9000 from the 80's, also. I had collected a significant amount of Minolta-mount lenses. When I finally decided to go digital, in 2005, Minolta got into financial trouble and sold off the camera division to SONY. This took about a full year.

    I was not going to buy a KM-7D just to support my glass habit. It no longer had any support and they had even closed up the webpage for it.

    No one was quite sure what SONY was up to, at the time, and I wasn't waiting around to find out. I had made my decision and chose Canon as the "next best thing". I looked at the Nikon D70s, initially, too, and was unimpressed. So, over the next year or so, I built up my Canon solution with several TAMRON lenses and the kick-butt Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM lens. Then, right after I bought that VERY EXPENSIVE lens ... SONY announces the α100!

    I quickly picked one up, a few days after the release, to see how it performed with the in-the-body IS and was truly pleased, but I also knew ... I was holding a prototype ... a band-aid, if you will, until the α700 got built. The camera worked with all my lenses ... but my lenses were for film cameras, not digitals. The APS-C sensor's DCF changed all the focal lengths on me.

    So, for about a year, I operated BOTH camera systems. An expensive venture, to be sure, but it gave me insight many others simply did not have. I could quickly compare the results from one system to another and offer opinion.

    Now, I should remind you that during this period, "I had found religion ..." by going back to college and getting my Photography Certificate. I was able to focus and develop my techniques and understanding of the craft, in ways that explained why I was getting some results I was unable to appreciate before. I also was able to teach some techniques to others in ways that went beyond the standard presentation. The better equipment was a far cry from the standard faire, so it was a "win-win" experience.

    Then, the α700 was announced at the PMA 07. Finally, the promise fulfilled. No prototype ... this was the true camera, the real deal, designed by Minolta and SONY.

    Canon had a chance, at that point, to upgrade the Prosumer-grade camera with the improvement of in-the-body anti-shake technology. They had the EOS 20D and 30D frames in great shape ... but the 40D NEEDED to be improved with this in-the-body stabilization feature to be viable for people using PRIME lenses and lower end, non-IS-equipped lenses. Canon and Nikon refused to do this ... thus sealing their doom, in my opinion. Instead of wiping out SONY at their own game, they are now behind the curve and have been for about a year, now. Sure, they are release cheaper IS-equipped lenses ... but if you use PRIMES (fixed focal length lenses between 14 & 200mm) or the MACROs, handheld ... you are hosed.

    As soon as the SONY A700 came out ... I sold off all my Canon equipment, short of my 35mm film body (EOS-3). I repurchased most of my Canon-mount lenses in SONY-mounts, with the sales proceeds, already knowing how well they performed, and rounded out my SONY bag. I even tried a pair of MACRO lens (90mm & 180mm) ... which I had been reluctant to commit to, until the α700 came out with dual-speed focus motoring (boy, was that a shot to the puss of many on the forum).

    My biggest disappointment, though, was the SONY 70-200mm f/2.8 G SSM ... which came to me defective from the manufacturer. It took a month to get that squared away ... and I was so mad, I returned it. $2000 lens ... defective. It cost me $50 in shpping to get that handled. It came broke and I wound up $50 poorer. Yeah, right.

    Anyway ... I had rushed things a bit ... knowing that TAMRON was also releasing the SP AF 70-200mm f/2.8 Di LD for a heck of a lot less ($700). I had wanted that range for the Christmas-season and wound up NOT getting it at all, because of the defect. Anyway, TAMRON still has yet to release the SONY-version of the lens ... I think we are looking at a June release. I believe their factory operations were waylaid by the upgrading of their other lens offerings by the introduction of the Nikon D40. That camera does not have a lens focus drive motor ... which means the lens must do all the work, so they retrofitted alot of TAMRON's newer consumer lenses to accomodate Nikon's strange decision. If TAMRON wanted to sell lenses to these low-end Nikon owners ... they'd have to do something about it. They did.

    Anyway, to answer your question ... in-the-body-IS and my initial investment in Minolta-mount glass. The α700 is just about everything you could ask for, in a camera. Somebody at SONY took the time to listen to the customers and older Minolta shooters and turned out a wonderful release.

    Yeah, it's a long story, but kind of sums up my tour of duty on the DCRP. Alot has happened since I joined the happy throng. Over 4000 postings worth ...
    Last edited by DonSchap; 04-29-2008 at 06:27 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr® & Sdi

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    A very long winded answer but very interesting. I too started out with Minolta back in 1979 and then upgraded to the 400si. I was very happy with that camera until the wife tried to load it one day and push in the screen. So that was my chance to get a new camera. The A100 had just come out and I did some research and it looked good so I bought it only to find out that the A700 was coming out. I am happy with the A100 for now but had I know I would have waited and got the A700.
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560
    Frank ... you asked for it. LOL

    Anyway, it has been more fun than I have had in many, many years. This coming summer holds a lot of promise .. and then, in the Fall ... the A900, perhaps.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr® & Sdi

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