Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. #1
    wataby Guest

    Question 35mm film to digital

    I have about 40 years of photos and negatives that I would like to preserve,can you copy to digital if so any ideas as to the best or easiest way?
    wataby

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
    Posts
    7,147
    Quote Originally Posted by wataby View Post
    I have about 40 years of photos and negatives that I would like to preserve,can you copy to digital if so any ideas as to the best or easiest way?
    wataby
    Cheapest and easiest way - buy a flatbed scanner and put the negatives on the scanner, scan them and let the software sort it all out. You don't need a very high resolution scanner unless you want to copy the grain in all its glory.

    Downside - the file format you choose to copy into might not survive for 40 years. There are already digital camera photo formats that are no longer supported by anybody.

    Another downside - the media you store on might not be around for another 40 years. Remember 3.5" floppy disks or 5.25" floppy disks? They were all the rage then vanished. Now a computer with a 3.5" floppy is a rarity.

    Don't even rely upon IDE hard disks being around much longer either - they're being replaced by SATA and even those are likely to be replaced within 20 years.

    The valve radio - try to get valves for one!
    Last edited by Rhys; 03-17-2008 at 10:46 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    1,129
    That's a little dramatic of you Rhys. Considering the standard CD size isn't likely to go anywhere (remember what a huge success mini discs were?) and the fact that Blu-Ray and HD-DVD are backwards compatible all the way back to the lowly CD, I think a CD or DVD would be pretty safe. And I don't see photoshop suddenly dropping jpeg support (or any of the other thousands of programs that support it simply becoming unavailable).

    But any place that develops film should be able to convert negatives to digital on a CD (they'll all have film scanners).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest (US)
    Posts
    128
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys View Post

    The valve radio - try to get valves for one!
    http://www.tubedepot.com/

    http://thetubestore.com/

    http://www.newtube.com/content/
    Digital:
    Canon PowerShot A570 IS

    Nikon D5000

    Film:
    Fujica ST605n
    Olympus XA


    Cameras from my past:
    Fujifilm S6000fd; Canon PowerShot S50; Canon PowerShot A40; Nikon N8008s; Pentax Spotmatic F; Fujica ST605; Canon Canonet GIII QL19

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    4,428
    Quote Originally Posted by wataby View Post
    I have about 40 years of photos and negatives that I would like to preserve,can you copy to digital if so any ideas as to the best or easiest way?
    wataby
    Like RHYS said. You can buy a negative scanner and scan them yourself. Good news is scanner nowadays don't cost an arm or a leg (compared to years back) but the bad news is there is no easy way if you are to do it properly. Remember to scan them at large size and not default settings of the scanner. Remember also to have lots of hard drives to back them up. Personally, I'd back them up on 2 hard drives in case of one failing later on.
    Nikon D90, D80
    Nikkor 16-85mm AF-S DX F/3.5-5.6G ED VR, Tamron SP AF 28-75mm F/2.8 XR Di LD Aspherical (IF) macro, Nikkor 50mm F/1.4D, Nikkor 50mm F/1.8D, Nikkor AF-S VR 70-300mm F/4.5-5.6G IF-ED, Sigma 105mm F/2.8 EX DG Macro ||| 2x SB800 | SB600 ||| Manfrotto 190XB

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Brookfield, MA
    Posts
    1,140
    Another good one out of the many out there.....
    http://www.tubesandmore.com/

    I've got several pieces of gear I use regularly that use tubes. Tubes aren't dead yet.

    So far as scanning negs, I've got a dedicated 35mm film scanner. If you're fussy about dust specks on a digital camera sensor, you'll really enjoy scanning negs. The software included with a scanner for dust cleanup works pretty well, but best to start with a clean neg. I've almost resolved it's easier to get good quality 4"x6" prints made from the negs and scan the prints.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    4,428
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_48 View Post
    ... I've almost resolved it's easier to get good quality 4"x6" prints made from the negs and scan the prints.
    If you scan an image from printed 6x4" you will lose image sharpness and clarity if you want to reprint at a larger size later. The same effect you get if you print a 16x20" out of a passport size photo since there is not much details on the small original image to begin with.
    Last edited by tim11; 03-18-2008 at 08:41 PM.
    Nikon D90, D80
    Nikkor 16-85mm AF-S DX F/3.5-5.6G ED VR, Tamron SP AF 28-75mm F/2.8 XR Di LD Aspherical (IF) macro, Nikkor 50mm F/1.4D, Nikkor 50mm F/1.8D, Nikkor AF-S VR 70-300mm F/4.5-5.6G IF-ED, Sigma 105mm F/2.8 EX DG Macro ||| 2x SB800 | SB600 ||| Manfrotto 190XB

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Terra Australis Incognita
    Posts
    3,877
    Quote Originally Posted by griptape View Post
    But any place that develops film should be able to convert negatives to digital on a CD (they'll all have film scanners).
    Do it yourself or look for a specialist. Standard film labs can sometimes do a pretty poor job or they subcontract it to a specialist firm.

    I scan this stuff professionally and there is a lot to learn about scanning - colour negatives are particularly difficult. You'll be able to do a great job yourself but it will take lots of time to do and effort to learn. If you're gainfully employed in a good paying job then pay a specialist. If money's tight and time is free then do it yourself treating it as a hobby.

    Oh and if you're just looking to preserve a memory rather than reproduce high art then Mark_48's right. If you have a choice between silver halide (not bubblejet) prints and negs scan the print it's heaps more intuitive. If quality is vital then use the neg.

    A high quality flatbed scanner will do a pretty reasonable job. Like everything to do with photography there's the cheap end of the market and the expensive end, what you want will likely be in the middle.

    PS If you live in Australia and want to pay someone then make sure it's me
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    2,346
    Recently a company has opened an outsourced scanning service, ScanCafe.com. They have received some decent reviews in reputable magazines and newspapers. They are cheaper than anyplace else from what I can tell.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
    Posts
    7,147
    Just something that cropped up... Somebody mentioned scanning from prints. This is not a good idea as I find most prints are very slightly out of focus.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •