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Thread: Canon 2S IS

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    5

    Canon 2S IS

    I have had this Camera for about 2 years and still am so unhappy with indoor shots. I have wonderful outdoor pictures but indoor I'm at a loss as to why my pictures are so blurry and even the slightest movement (ex. children and hand movement) makes the picture horrible. The flash just blows everything out with a shadow behind the subject. I have recently tried the P setting at 400. I'm not sure if my camera needs repair or if it's just the operator. I've never been happy with indoor shots.

    I had an old Olympus and never had these problems.

    Here are some examples if anyone could help. The first two are the grainy and the last is with the flash. Any help would be appreciated. I just want as sharp a picture as I get outdoors.

    Thanks so much.
    Sandy
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,173
    In the first shot, your shutter speed is too slow. There's not much light, you didn't use the flash, so the camera has two main options to gather enough light: boost the ISO (which leads to noisy images) or choose a longer shutter speed (which leads to subject movement and blur).

    The third shot shows the disadvantage of using the flash: harsh highlights.

    The middle shot is hard to see the noise at that small image size, but ISO 400 is going to be noisy on this camera.

    I have an S3, which has the same limitations. There's nothing wrong with your camera. It's not great at low light but you can do better. Stay out of Auto mode, that won't produce good results. You can adjust the strength of the flash, so when taking shots like that third on drop the intensity. In the first case, boost the ISO to 200 and take lots of shots in burst mode: you'll get a few that freeze the action. Or use flash. Or use ISO 400 and Noise Ninja to clean things up a bit.

    Your old Olympus was probably better at low light - it's the penalty we pay for cameras with more MP and a bigger zoom lens. This camera isn't a great low light model so you'll have to do more manual stuff on your own to make up for it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    5
    Thanks so much. I will definately try those suggestions. Maybe I'll make a practice of using my old camera for those indoor low light shots and stick to the other camera for other things.

    In your opinion is there a better camera out there that has the whole package in the same price range or less? There are times that I want to be creative which this camera has been good for and other times where I just want a simple good shot quickly.

    Thanks so much

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    814

    High ISOs = high noise?

    David's nailed it all pretty well, particularly his advice about the S2 and ISO 400 stretching the friendship. The flash shot is also OoF.

    One small detail if you post some EXIF information with each of your shots (at least aperture, ISO, shutter speed etc) we'll be able to offer you more meaningful advice. When you post downsized images here, the EXIF is stripped out.

    Cheers

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Posts
    3,650
    And you can turn down flash compensation and or stand further away from the subject to avoid blowing out the subject. I'd also pick up "Understanding Exposure" Revised Edition by Bryan Peterson a lite read that's just great.

    I switched to the D40 for some of those very same reasons and it has really been a joy I've only used my S3 a handful of times since getting the D40. the kit lens is super it's not much larger than the S2/S3... to give you a for instance as to why I rarely use the S3 these days when I fist got the D40 I took a cute picture of my daughter and grandson while sleeping. In a dimly lit room the D40 nailed it on the first try. Out of curiosity I decided to see how the S3 would do in the same situation. It took eleven attempts to get near what the D40 got. the first problem was it was so dim the viewfinder was useless so I had to chimp until I got close. Needless to say if it was one of those once in a lifetime shots which it was I would have missed the shot. add a 55-200 vr to that and your set.
    I thought about who I am... and realized I was an
    unformed, unreconciled imagery, without "GOD"


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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,173
    On the other hand, I carry my S3 when skiing and the single lens with such a big zoom range, ability to take video, and much smaller size are why I stick with the ultrazoom. It's a compromise, and low light shooting is what I've had to work around. A DSLR would be great for those situations but I only carry one camera with me.

    Well, two cameras. I also have an SD800 that is handy at all times.

    Another thing to try is a homemade flash diffuser, basically a piece of white paper to defect the flash from directly falling on your subject.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    5
    Thanks again. I will pick up that book. I'm so new to all this but it is becoming a passion with me. Thanks for the posting tip I will try that next time.

    Sandy

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Posts
    3,650
    I'm sure you'll enjoy it... if you need any more help let me know.
    I thought about who I am... and realized I was an
    unformed, unreconciled imagery, without "GOD"


    NikonD?
    and some other Nikon stuff

    0.0%

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